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Thread: The Dog Park.

  1. #11

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    I totally agree, I'm gonna get something going but I'm not sure what just yet.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    I just think he really wants to play with the other dogs. He does go absolutely nuts
    The intention - makes no difference really. It needs to be managed the same way as you do an aggressive dog. If you take your dog into the park and you have control - others won't. Labradors will routinely get in every other dog's face and knock over Granny as well. This is bad but your dog needs to be able to handle it without hurting the other dog intentionally or not - or accidentally being hurt when he lunges after another dog "to play" and gets pulled up by his neck.

    One guy I used to train with at dog club - has a Rottweiler - and not a pedigree one either. Worst temperament ever. He said it just wanted to play, but it played way too rough for most other dogs and he would not manage or intervene. So my dog did her usual greeting thing - rolls over on her back with her paws in the air. His dog chomps my dog's paw "in play" so hard that my dog can't put weight on it for 10 minutes. So that was it for me and mine. And he - the owner - is saying "it's only play" as if that makes it ok.

    No it doesn't. Yes the rottie could have ripped my dog to pieces and it didn't but it was still way to rough and he did nothing about it. And that rottie got worse and worse because he didn't set any limits or supervise / reward good play. So now when it comes to dog club it has to be in a metal crate when he's not with it (he used to leave it tied to a pole and it would break away and attack dogs) and it's not allowed off lead at all ever.

    He was trying agility with it, and it decided to leave the start line and attack my dog and another dog. There was no play in that at all. And he said that agility people weren't very welcoming. Excuse my rant - but please don't be like that person.

    Rough play might as well be picking fights. Desensitise your dog where you have control and all the other dogs are under control and can't get in your dog's face and overwhelm it emotionally. You need to have your dog calm and not over the top or it's just learning to fend for itself any way it can like the Rottie.

    That's why obedience clubs are better than being in an off lead park - even if your dog is on lead.

  3. #13

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    My dog is not like that dog and I'm not like that guy. Like what maddogdodge said, my dog wouldn't hurt a fly. But it could get worse and I said so in my op. Obedience class is only once a week, where I live anyway, and that won't be enough. The handlers are all voluntary people so I don't really think they know what they are doing (not that I do) but I'm gonna contact them and ask what they can do for me because doing normal dog lessons is an impossibility.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,291

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    If you do go to the dog park, stay outside the fence until you start seeing an improvement in your dog's ability to control himself when he sees other dogs. Dog parks can be very confronting places, especially when you have a dog that doesn't immediately "fit in". Him not paying attention to other dogs' body language can result in fights, even with him on lead.

    If you walk around the outside when there's dogs on the other side, you can just focus on teaching him that he needs to calm down before you allow him to go near another dog. You can also do this by simply walking parallel to the fence and blocking him (standing between him and the dog behind the fence) until his body relaxes when he gets over excited. Then gradually walk closer and closer to the fence. That's a good start I think. You'll have to assess how you can best progress from there, but my advice is to take it slowly.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    If you do go to the dog park, stay outside the fence until you start seeing an improvement in your dog's ability to control himself
    This. Don't go in until your dog is showing some self control. They can't learn when they're emotionally overwhelmed (too excited).

    Your dog can hurt other dogs just by jumping on them or frightening them.

    Glad you're not like that other guy.

  6. #16

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    York, Western Australia
    Posts
    36

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    Tara was 8 months old, and horribly abused when I got her. Extremely reactive to other dogs, and with fear based aggression. She was 3 by the time I got to obedience classes, and she wanted to fight every new dog she met. After many months of training she could sit 4 feet from a strange dog, with me a distance away and not want to attack......but this was only in a training situation......she is an old lady now, and she still wants to fight all new dogs.

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