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Thread: Pug owner questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default Pug owner questions

    I have a lovely neighbour of kids gallore and a pug. Now this pug, plus 2 others i know are rather football shaped. Is this the norm for adult pugs? are they incredibly prone to obesity or something? Like labs for instance. You see a lot of dogs that once used to be a labrador and have morphed into square barrels.

    My daughter wants to purchase a pug. she'd walk my dogs twice a year, whether they needed it or not touch, so wondering, if her's too will end up a football? How much exercise can you give a pug? what are they for? as in, what drives do they have. Clearly from my neighbours dogs, she loves the children, and company of my dogs, and pops over early evening to join in the dog play fights. But generally whilst excited to visit for 10 seconds, then sits in a safe place to watch them. Happy with the old dame position of wall flower.

    Ive heard that black ones have the devil in them compared to fawn, is this rumour or real?
    What health issues do pugs have, besides breathing difficulties. Can they deliver pups without C section, as the heads seem as big or bigger than the torso?

    I know nowt about small breeds, but each pug ive met seems larger than healthy, and asthmatic sounding. Ive not seen a slim one yet.
    would a pug be able to join us on a 2k walk for instance?
    Homer, my friend's pug, was walked daily, but my friend would have to take a golf club, and drive him along with it, or he'd just sit down. So plently of sedate exercise, but fat as a wombat looks.

    I said id ask folks on here, for info pug related for her. I would appreaciate any info, and any suggested breeders in melbourne. Also what would be a reasonable price for a pet pug. She'll not be showing. She'll rarely walk her dog if how she behaves here is anything to go by.

  2. #2

    Default

    This is probably another reason for you to get in touch with ‘Nekhbet’ – she will be able to answer all of your questions !

    From what I know of pugs:

    They are expensive to buy and if the breeder hasn’t done the necessary health tests – they are very expensive to own. Even looking at getting one from a rescue – you are looking at ~ $850 and above because of all their health issues.

    Yes - the black ones seem to have more character than the fawns !

    They can be kept lean and fit – but most people who own these dogs aren't aware of this fact.

    If you daughter is not up to exercising a dog – does that also go for training the dog ?

    Why are you asking about the breeding of pugs ? I thought you were just looking at buying a pug – not breeding with one !

    Health problems with pugs:

    Disorders by Breed - Pug - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    Best do your homework – not only here !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Haven't noticed much difference between pugs by colour.

    They do love food and it's up to the owner not to cave in to those big brown eyes or do something dumb like get pebble paving - cos a hungry pug will eat that. Not sure where puggerup/huggapup is - she hasn't got pugs at the moment but she did have them. I think there is a pug rescue org somewhere.

    And they shed lots. Like JRTs... pat a pug, give it a butt rub (loves a good rub on that knobbly bit above the tail) and I usually get enough hair to stuff a couple of small pillows.

    They've got lots of personality.

    They're prone to eye problems (cherry eye and ingrown eye lids/lashes) and breathing problems. And sometimes joint problems - especially if allowed to get fat. Most pugs you see out and about are fat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    My black is a right nutter. And no, they should not be that difficult a breed. They are prone to obesity because people keep feeding them and treating them like a toy, not a dog. Mine was only on a quarter of a cup of Advance a day and weighed over 8 kg, which ruined her front feet (she has scars from knuckle dragging) and made breathing difficult. It's just like any fat creature, weight contributes to so many problems and they are still a normal dog under there. She trimmed down a couple of kgs, raw diet and LOTS of raw bones to help her retain what teeth didn't rot out of her mouth from the previous diet. She's 12 years old and her problems are arthritis in the front legs (from 7 years outside only and obesity) partial blindness due to pigment growing over the eye (pug thing, she gets about fine) some deafness (age related) and her food has to be prepared a certain way or she may choke (this is from lack of teeth and greed to put most big corporations to shame) so really she's quite easy to look after. She also had one litter when she was young and free whelped.

    Like any breed, a good puppy from a good breeder is worth it's weight in gold.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    3,082

    Default

    Thankyou for this info.
    Im gathering: dog is fat due to human negligence re diet amount/quality
    Dog is a shedder: must say, i groom next doors due to this. Laughed at 'pat them, and enough fur to stuff a pillow'. That is so right for my neighbours!
    And expensive. To purchase, and in vet fees. < this maybe prohibitive, as new home, skint early adult stuff going on for my daughter.

    Riley, we've been on this forum for years together, and you think i would breed a dog? I know nothing about breeding, genes, and from what ive seen of my friend who is a breeder, way too much like hard work. I struggled with my own babies, who were stationery, id never cope with puppies! lol or letting them go more precisely. Id end up keeping them all :0

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    My pug actually doesnt shed that much. If you think about it, the fact most of them are fat probably contributes to shedding - the dog has to loose coat to negate the fact it's finding it hard to lose normal body heat. Twice I year I get a good amount but a couple of good brushes and it's out. I pull at her fur gently to check, she rarely needs any coat maintenance otherwise.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

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