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Thread: New staffy - ex breeding bitch - settling- in issues with family - long post

  1. #41
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    I doubt she could have hurt herself as she has been in the home for the past couple of days.
    Nice thought but actually dogs can do quite a bit to hurt themselves in the home.

    Mostly by jumping on or off furniture or beds. My brother's SBT managed to break her leg jumping off a bed and crash landing. They can eat something they shouldn't like a whole croc rubber shoe or sock or undies or strapping tape, or nappy out the bin. Nappies are really poisonous but taste delicious according to my dog. The dirtier the better. Yuck.

    Some anxious dogs will run around bashing into things or if they're in a crate - bust all their teeth on the steel mesh of the crate. I know of a border collie who busted her teeth on her crate. The owner ended up getting her a very special kind of crate that she was unable to get her teeth into the shade cloth mesh of it.

    The thundershirt is good but I don't think it's meant to be left on all the time. Plus you want to start her getting used to your environment without it. So a bit of time on and a bit of time off - like an ice pack almost - hopefully it came with relevant instructions?

    If she's been living in a concrete floored cage - kennel, she's probably not exactly house trained - so you will need to supervise toileting same as for a puppy. Make sure you take her out for a pee and poop every two hours while you're home and make sure she gets no food for four hours before bed time. Leaving food out all the time (free feeding) and toilet training tend to be mutually exclusive. So if bed time is 10:30, food gets put away after 6:30pm. Once you're confident about toilet training - you can be less rigid about this but for now, be as strict as you can manage. If she's going to be shut in the house all day - feed her in the evening when you're home to let her out.

    So she goes out for pee-poop after eating, after waking up, after play and before bed time. And every two hours if the gap between is longer. An older dog can usually hang on for longer but it does take some training to let the dog know where the appropriate place is to pee/poop.

    First few times out - keep her on lead, take her to where you want her to go, say your magic pee poop command. For example "potty time" or mine is "shitnapiss", a friend's was "mr keating" - pick something you're not too embarrassed to say in ear shot of your neighbours.

    Praise (and treat if she will take it) for going where you want. Eg outside. on the lawn.

    This is the hard part... don't let her back in until you've seen her go. If you're expecting a poop, don't cave in because it's taking too long. Just be boring - stand around and wait - with her on lead so she can't go anywhere. Maybe walk in small circles and encourage sniffing. Pay attention to when she normally needs to crap (how long after dinner is that?) and make sure she's out at those times.

    Never assume she doesn't need to go or she's been if you didn't see it happen. Some dogs would rather poop inside for various reasons, like feeling safer or keeping their feet dry and warm, and they will go inside if you cave in early.

    And I second - get her checked at the vet for injuries from running, jumping or crashing into things, and for possibly eating something bad. Was she desexed before she was sent to you? there could be a bunch of issues related to her being a breeding bitch (desexed or not) that might cause her to feel in pain and sooky as a result.

    What you describe
    She is lying down in a corner of my study just sleeping. She won't come to me, even if i am holding a treat for her.
    seems a bit like a dog in pain.

    she might also have bloat. Really scary (life threatening) problem related to eating too soon before or after exercise, but sometimes just happens for no apparent reason.
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/dog-healt...oat-chart.html

    Or just be knackered from being exercised so much more than she's used to. Imagine an office worker who lives and works in a small cage all day with no exercise, a couple of days into a hiking holiday.

    Hope the vet helps with some useful info.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Do you know anyone with a dog(preferably Stafford or other breed which likes to play a bit rough) who you could invite over to play? Remember, she's just left an environment with many dogs to live in a one dog household. Maybe bringing another dog around for some play time might help her? Playing down the beach or park is good, but maybe some good play time in her new backyard would help her start to enjoy her new life.

    You'll get there, don't despair, just keep trying different things and keep asking the experts on this forum(definately not me but I'll chuck in my two bobs anyway)
    Thank, that's a really great idea. She loves the dog beach but I am afraid our recall is not good. If i let her off the leash she is tearing it up to go to the nearest dog - which is doggie heaven for her. The thing is, I find it impossible to call her back and have to actively chase her and grab her. This is why I have not let her off the lead at the beach lately. I have a long line leash coming so I am hoping that this will help in recall training.

    thanks again

    Cheers

    Adrian

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Nice thought but actually dogs can do quite a bit to hurt themselves in the home.

    Mostly by jumping on or off furniture or beds. My brother's SBT managed to break her leg jumping off a bed and crash landing. They can eat something they shouldn't like a whole croc rubber shoe or sock or undies or strapping tape, or nappy out the bin. Nappies are really poisonous but taste delicious according to my dog. The dirtier the better. Yuck.

    Some anxious dogs will run around bashing into things or if they're in a crate - bust all their teeth on the steel mesh of the crate. I know of a border collie who busted her teeth on her crate. The owner ended up getting her a very special kind of crate that she was unable to get her teeth into the shade cloth mesh of it.

    The thundershirt is good but I don't think it's meant to be left on all the time. Plus you want to start her getting used to your environment without it. So a bit of time on and a bit of time off - like an ice pack almost - hopefully it came with relevant instructions?

    If she's been living in a concrete floored cage - kennel, she's probably not exactly house trained - so you will need to supervise toileting same as for a puppy. Make sure you take her out for a pee and poop every two hours while you're home and make sure she gets no food for four hours before bed time. Leaving food out all the time (free feeding) and toilet training tend to be mutually exclusive. So if bed time is 10:30, food gets put away after 6:30pm. Once you're confident about toilet training - you can be less rigid about this but for now, be as strict as you can manage. If she's going to be shut in the house all day - feed her in the evening when you're home to let her out.

    So she goes out for pee-poop after eating, after waking up, after play and before bed time. And every two hours if the gap between is longer. An older dog can usually hang on for longer but it does take some training to let the dog know where the appropriate place is to pee/poop.

    First few times out - keep her on lead, take her to where you want her to go, say your magic pee poop command. For example "potty time" or mine is "shitnapiss", a friend's was "mr keating" - pick something you're not too embarrassed to say in ear shot of your neighbours.

    Praise (and treat if she will take it) for going where you want. Eg outside. on the lawn.

    This is the hard part... don't let her back in until you've seen her go. If you're expecting a poop, don't cave in because it's taking too long. Just be boring - stand around and wait - with her on lead so she can't go anywhere. Maybe walk in small circles and encourage sniffing. Pay attention to when she normally needs to crap (how long after dinner is that?) and make sure she's out at those times.

    Never assume she doesn't need to go or she's been if you didn't see it happen. Some dogs would rather poop inside for various reasons, like feeling safer or keeping their feet dry and warm, and they will go inside if you cave in early.

    And I second - get her checked at the vet for injuries from running, jumping or crashing into things, and for possibly eating something bad. Was she desexed before she was sent to you? there could be a bunch of issues related to her being a breeding bitch (desexed or not) that might cause her to feel in pain and sooky as a result.

    What you describe

    seems a bit like a dog in pain.

    she might also have bloat. Really scary (life threatening) problem related to eating too soon before or after exercise, but sometimes just happens for no apparent reason.
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/dog-healt...oat-chart.html

    Or just be knackered from being exercised so much more than she's used to. Imagine an office worker who lives and works in a small cage all day with no exercise, a couple of days into a hiking holiday.

    Hope the vet helps with some useful info.
    Hi Hyacinth,

    Thanks again for all your advice. I hope she is ok but I am glad to get to the vet to check her out.

    Cheers

    Adrian

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ados View Post
    Thank, that's a really great idea. She loves the dog beach but I am afraid our recall is not good. If i let her off the leash she is tearing it up to go to the nearest dog - which is doggie heaven for her. The thing is, I find it impossible to call her back and have to actively chase her and grab her. This is why I have not let her off the lead at the beach lately. I have a long line leash coming so I am hoping that this will help in recall training.

    thanks again

    Cheers

    Adrian
    I'm sure plenty of people will shoot me down for this but, at this stage, recall doesn't matter. The only thing that matters when are able to get her back eventually without any harm coming to her and being sure that she won't harm any other dogs ... she needs good fun positive experiences, recall can wait(like I said though make sure it's in a place where she can't get harmed and be sure she won't harm others ... don't underestimate a Staffords ability to harm if they decide to do so)

    When I got my young Brockle, he hated the car. For the first few weeks he'd shake and drool and often spew in the car because he hated it so much, but by taking him places where he had great fun he now jumps into the car without even being asked.a

    Like I said, others will disagree but IMO recall can wait, your job is to keep her safe and make everything as fun as possible so she associates living with her new family as great fun.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I'm sure plenty of people will shoot me down for this but, at this stage, recall doesn't matter. The only thing that matters when are able to get her back eventually without any harm coming to her and being sure that she won't harm any other dogs ... she needs good fun positive experiences, recall can wait(like I said though make sure it's in a place where she can't get harmed and be sure she won't harm others ... don't underestimate a Staffords ability to harm if they decide to do so)

    When I got my young Brockle, he hated the car. For the first few weeks he'd shake and drool and often spew in the car because he hated it so much, but by taking him places where he had great fun he now jumps into the car without even being asked.a

    Like I said, others will disagree but IMO recall can wait, your job is to keep her safe and make everything as fun as possible so she associates living with her new family as great fun.
    'mymatejack' - Why would anyone shoot you down in flames for anything that you post ?

    Common sense is a valuable asset to have - and you have that in spades ! I really enjoy reading your posts - so keep on posting - please !

    smiley-eatdrink004.gif

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Like I said, others will disagree but IMO recall can wait, your job is to keep her safe and make everything as fun as possible so she associates living with her new family as great fun.
    The recall is important mainly because a staffy is a stong little dog and can do damage to elderely people and kids. My mothers elderley friend broke her leg badly when an out of control dog actually a staffy trying to play with her little dog knocked her flying leaving her permanently crippled. My elderley mother is terrified of out of control dogs when walking her dog and has been known to sit down on the ground to avoid being bowled over. Better to perhaps arrange a play date or to explain to people first before unleashing her, making sure you keep elderely people safe. I am very aware of this having had to step in fornt of my eighty year old mother to protect her on quite a few occasions.

    To me it sounds like the dog is simply much more socialised with other dogs than people which is proabably consistant with the environment she has come from. The long line sounds like a good idea. You can certainly make recall training lots of fun.

    My mothers ex breeding bitch would run a mile everytime my mother coughed. The TV etc startled her. He eyes would grow very wide and she would run. She took quite a long time to settle in but it did gradually happen. You just have to be patient and give her time and space to adjust. My mothers dog improved a lot over time. She always carried the residual effects of being bought up in kennel life but on the whole she did adapt.

    Having fun with other dogs in a safe manner is a good idea but definitely work on making human interations a fun activity without forcing the issue.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 02-25-2014 at 12:02 PM.

  7. #47
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    If i let her off the leash she is tearing it up to go to the nearest dog - which is doggie heaven for her
    with a new dog in the home - for the first month, it's best not to let them off lead anywhere that recall matters - ie you can't corner them to catch if necessary. A new dog takes a while to see you as "home" and their "safe place" and may happily nick off with anyone or any dog who seems nice in the moment. This was a mistake I made with my dog when she was a puppy. I'd take her to a cricket oval and let her run with everyone. She was safe enough - but she didn't see me as "home" or where she should be tracking back to at all and our recall now is still suffering. Too much fun from anywhere but me.

    The good thing about what you have been doing tho - is going and getting her when she doesn't come back. One of the best ways to teach your dog it's ok to ignore you is to call and call and call when there is zero chance the dog is coming back to you. You will find there is a sort of zone of responsiveness - where if the dog is 2m (for example) from you and you call - they will always come back... extend that out to 10m and they might come back if there is nothing distracting out there and 25m and they do what they want and ignore you... And you can extend the radius of your dog's zone but gradually - little by little with lots of practice recalls - touch collar and release around the edge of the zone.

    If you do decide to let her have a run at the beach - say her name, touch her collar and give her a small treat (example 1/4 mini goodo or thumbnail piece of roast chicken) when she comes and "checks in" with you. don't use the treats as a lure to get her back. And never give her a treat unless you can get hold of her collar first.

  8. #48
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    It sounds to me as if she is just awfully lonely So I think I'd arrange for her as many playdates as possible to show her that she can still have fun being an only dog. You said you'd consider adding a second dog to the household eventually. Have you thought about doing that sooner rather than later? Maybe it would help her settling and bonding if she wasn't alone?

  9. #49
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    Its hard to say about adding another dog. My mother had another friendly dog but her bitch was too traumatised really and not sure it made a lot of difference. I think it is really important to try and work on the human dog bond which this dog obvuously lacks. I personally would be inclined to have one session with someone like Kathy mentioned in a previous posts if you are finding it hard. Might give you a professional slant on how to best work on this. Otherwise I would just be patient and try and find things that she likes other than other dogs to try and strengthen human interaction.

    You know living in WA you have the choice of some wonderful dog clubs. The instructors most of whom I know are really good dog handlers and may be able to really help you out. PM me if you want more info and I could perhaps point you in the right direction depending on where you live. Joining a club you have access to the training classes such as obedience, rallyO, agility etc. A lot of people just do it to build a relationship with their dog and have fun rather than to compete. Could be a thought.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 02-25-2014 at 12:16 PM.

  10. #50
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    she is just awfully lonely
    I dunno. Most of her life would have been a small cage surrounded by other barking dogs - like at the pound. I reckon she'd be used to being on her own. But she might be more used to noise not quiet. I think - apart from the possibility of some kind of injury - she's just a tad freaked out by everything and if she has had a lot more exercise than she's used to she'd be muscle sore as well. If some of that running around involved prangs with other dogs - again sore.

    It is still early days for this dog. Maybe we expect too much too soon?

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