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Thread: Fostering a puppy mill dog

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Default Fostering a puppy mill dog

    Our rescue is getting 6 female KCCs from a "breeder" in about 3 weeks. I don't know the exact details, but it sounds like they come from a real puppy farm. They're all about 5-6, so I'm assuming these are just their discarded breeding bitches.

    I agreed to foster one. In fact, I said "I might take 2" before it really dawned on me where they come from and did a google on rehabilitating puppy mill dogs and freaked out a bit.

    So another 3 weeks and I suppose I won't know 100% sure if I'll get one until shortly before. But anyone any experience in rehabilitation of puppy farm or other neglected/abused dogs? I did a google and found some useful resources, but it's always so much more helpful to "talk" to someone. I feel quite out of my comfort zone with this one, but want to help and am committed to put in the effort that's needed. Only time is a bit of an issue as I work 5 days...

    I have a crate that should be OK for her. I also have some baby gates. Might see if I can score a cheap play pen somewhere. I'll cook some liver cubes for rewards, get some rawhide chews. Anything else I might need to get?

  2. #2
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    The best thing you can do is give them space and time to adjust. This is gong to sounds stupid to some but you should make the new bed/sleeping area similar to how she lived in her puppy farm. I don't mean the mess and dirt etc but I mean keep it similar. Dogs that are kept in cages or runs from critical period can freak out if their "normal" is drastically changed to wide open spaces and lots of sounds, smells, etc.

    If you have a quiet room that you can place the crate, that would be best. Allow her access to come out if/when she wants but it's totally up to her. Don't let Banjo crowd her, but chances are she is fine with other dogs given her previous living conditions.

    Perhaps look into the book "living with and training a fearful dog" as it has some great info about rehabilitating dogs with not so good pasts.
    A Guide to Living with & Training a Fearful Dog: Debbie Jacobs: 9780615387512: Amazon.com: Books

    I'm sure others will offer you advise.
    Good Luck with it. It's so rewarding but will definitely take time. The puppy farm dogs are usually the messed up ones. Poor things.

  3. #3
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    Australia
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    I absolutely applaud you for what you are doing for this poor dog, good on you, it may not always be easy, but then again it may turn out well and be easier than you think, either way, good on you for doing this. : )

    I too am looking after an older dog that we suspect was used for years by a backyard breeder/puppy mill and she is just fine, didn't have too much settling in problems either, her name is Missy and she is an 8 year old Chihuahua/terrier cross, the only thing I've found really hard is walking her on the lead, she has no clue and pulls, pulls, pulls but Im working on it every day : )

  4. #4
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    The rescue organisation should provide you with a plan, backup and training for taking in dogs like this. It's not all that hard it just takes time, and not feeling sorry for them. Routine, firm guidance they come out of their shell.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  5. #5
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    Good to hear that, Bella. There's just no knowing how badly mistreated she has been until she arrives. I'm expecting the worst and hoping for the best.

    Unfortunately the rescue I work for is severely underresourced and would not have the money to hire trainers. It's not ideal but there are a few good reasons for that and some of those are also the reason why I choose to foster for them and not for the local, very well funded and supported organisation. But it is a tad daunting to not have that support to fall back on. I do have a friend who knows some RSPCA trainers, one of whom has fostered puppy farm dogs. I might check if I could call them for advice before the dog arrives.

    Mind you, still haven't heard when she will arrive. It should be in 2 weeks.

    In the meantime, we got our 7th and 8th foster kitten for the season last weekend. But the house feels a bit empty now with only one dog!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Perth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Our rescue is getting 6 female KCCs from a "breeder" in about 3 weeks. I don't know the exact details, but it sounds like they come from a real puppy farm. They're all about 5-6, so I'm assuming these are just their discarded breeding bitches.

    I agreed to foster one. In fact, I said "I might take 2" before it really dawned on me where they come from and did a google on rehabilitating puppy mill dogs and freaked out a bit.

    So another 3 weeks and I suppose I won't know 100% sure if I'll get one until shortly before. But anyone any experience in rehabilitation of puppy farm or other neglected/abused dogs? I did a google and found some useful resources, but it's always so much more helpful to "talk" to someone. I feel quite out of my comfort zone with this one, but want to help and am committed to put in the effort that's needed. Only time is a bit of an issue as I work 5 days...

    I have a crate that should be OK for her. I also have some baby gates. Might see if I can score a cheap play pen somewhere. I'll cook some liver cubes for rewards, get some rawhide chews. Anything else I might need to get?
    Hi Beloz,
    I also have a ex-breeder girl Staffy named Serena. i have a long post below where you might get some ideas from the many fantastic people that are helping me with my girl. Everday is different and i think for me, getting Serena out with other dogs at the beach has been the best thing for her.

    good luck

    Adrian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,596

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    Loose lead walking, every step you take when the dog is pulling - encourages more pulling. So being insanely tedious about standing still while the dog is pulling, and praising the second it lets some slack into the lead... is the only way forward... kikopup is your friend.

    This is Ados thread for reference

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/general-d...long-post.html

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