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Thread: Pups and kids developement of social skills

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Pups and kids developement of social skills

    They are out in force around here, folks who got pups for xmas.
    and ive met the cutest of all of em, a 14wk GSD shark! He's ballsy, mouthy, fears nowt, affectionate and playful as all hell. He was out with his teenage lad this morning. Man pups are so cute! so bitey, so full on!

    Brian was totally confused as to why his face was the target of them teeth, and why his jowls make a great swinging rope for a pup! lol
    Twas Pohm that would remove the pup and then took him under her wing aka stole him and was herding him back into our garden for later lol

    Teenage lad just kept looking at Bernie, and saying, i never realised they get so big! Looking at the size of the pups feet, i dont think this will be a small GSD, it'll be so nice to be able to catch up with this pup from time to time and watch him develop.
    Turning from biting machine (now) to devoted obedient GSD adult. Hopefully.

    Teenager handled pup very well. Its their 3rd dog in his life, with 2 dogs labs passing away when he was 9. I was noticing how the teenager was:
    totally comfortable around my dogs, knew how to interact and sending good signals constantly
    firm with his pup, and making it sit and calm, before releasing him to latch onto brians face again lol
    really socially skilled, as talking away to a middle aged woman with 3 brutes who were well up for a game of pup chase.
    He was polite, knowledgeable pet owner, he was 14yrs and a credit to his parents.

    Dogs are amazing teachers arent they. How confident was this lad was around people and dogs. Such a asset in raising kids, animals are.

  2. #2

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    They are aren't they?

    And it's so nice to hear such a positive new dog for Christmas story.

    I was joking not long ago that my dogs recently saved me a very awkward conversation. When breeding two of mine, my 7 year old daughter was super excited about the prospect of pups, and we had planned this breeding for years. So she had to be in on it from the beginning and be there when the dogs were mated...

    Birds and bees discussion - tick!

    When I was a kid I had guinea pigs and was always breeding them - never batted an eyelid at the facts of life either!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Birds and bees discussion - tick!

    When I was a kid I had guinea pigs and was always breeding them - never batted an eyelid at the facts of life either!
    My mum grew up on a farm and then did nursing so she was very familiar with "mating".

    But one of my friends grew up surrounded by pets that were let to breed as they pleased, and she studied some sort of biology stuff that was a lead in subject for vet school and ... when they explained that humans mate the same way as other mammals - she stood up in class and declared

    "My parents never did that".

    And cracked her entire class up because she was one of 9 children.

  4. #4
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    Letting your kids help with training is an excellent way to teach them to consider their actions and how they affect others too. I am still constantly telling my 9yo to give the dogs clear instructions though. She will often just yell their name and that is something that I won't let her get away with. "What is it you want them to do? What is the cue for that? You can't expect the dog to read your mind." And of course, if she wants the foster pup to do anything for her, she will need to train that behaviour. Properly. I don't do it for her and am totally fine with the dog ignoring her if she hasn't put any effort into conditioning the dog to her squeaky voice cues. So it's very much a 'you reap what you sow' situation and a good lesson.

  5. #5
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    Victoria Stillwell's list for Christmas puppies
    http://positively.com/2014/01/03/top...dos-and-donts/

    2. Do take your time. It’s a lifetime commitment. Rescue dogs come with either more or less behavioral issues than when abandoned, largely dependent on the rescue’s choice of training methods.

    Examine the shelter or rescue organization grounds and policies closely.

    3. Do socialize as early as possible. Socialize slowly and carefully to people, stranger-dogs and moving objects with frequent and regular exposure. If your dog is fearful or aggressive, the dog park is NOT the place to practice. It can make your dog worse...and it's not fair to the other dogs.

    4. Don’t wait until your dog has received all the vaccinations to begin safe socialization activities. Check the PetProfessionalsGuild.org for a socialization checklist, to find out how Socialization and Vaccinations Go Together, as well as OperationSocialization.com for more safety guidelines.

    5. Do use “do no harm’ training methods. Positive does not mean permissive. Establish clear boundaries and be consistent.

    6. Don’t use old-fashioned dominance methods or collar equipment that may hurt your dog both psychologically and physically.

    7. Do “listen” to your dog’s body language and vocalizations. Your dog talks to you and to dogs through behavior, body language and vocalizations. Speak your dog’s language by using hand signals.

    8. Don’t mistake fear for respect. Dogs don’t and never will “respect” anyone. Their brains are not sufficiently complex to process a concept such as respect.

    9. Do use the power of food to train and change emotions in your dog. Later, transition slowly to affection, toys and real life reinforcements.

    10. Don’t forget your furry new bundle of joy depends on your care, kindness, patience and diligence to make his new home a warm and wonderful place to be all year long.
    Not sure about the respect thing - for me it's when your dog does what you ask when you ask it. And it's a direct reflection of my skills as a trainer - ie if she doesn't do that, we need to do more training.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-08-2014 at 11:29 AM.

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