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Thread: dog punishment

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    So when is force (smack, hit, kick) appropriate ?

    Depends on how bad the deed is i reckon but there are times where a force full punishment is justified .

    I've had a dog on a lead that tried to have a go at a kid and he got a smack up the chops. A stern yelling, check or finger pointing in this situation seems pointless.

    Dont get me wrong... i dont hit my dogs for any old reason nor am i acting tough (heck that the last thing i'd expect you guys would think anyway LOL).

    Surely i'm not the only one who has layed a hand on their dogs in anger.
    With the kid example I can understand that if it was the first time it happened and caught you by surprise, it would need to be swift so the timing was right and the dog knew the behaviour that it was being reprimanded for. However I would then seriously consider what I needed to do to prevent it happening again.

    I have smacked 2 of my dogs for chasing kangaroos. They have good recalls, but when I first moved on the farm the only thing that made them think twice was a smack. I think it had shock value because it is not something I usually do. Now with kangaroos I just have to used a strong recall voice and they know by the tone of my voice that I will smack them if they dont obey.

    They also know that this probably the only situation I will smack them for. I didnt call them to me before I smacked so they didnt associate coming with a smack, I caught the 2 offenders when they bought the roo down and I was so angry as I was dodging kicks from the roo. Everyone including the roo escaped without injury, but it could have killed with a kick. I just wont have it. The other dogs knew I was angry and kept well clear of the whole debacle, like butter wouldnt melt.

  2. #32
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    Thanks for the link Hyacinth... very interesting.
    Last edited by margoo; 01-06-2014 at 11:27 AM.

  3. #33
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    Man, Gracie doesn't fear me at all but then again nothing seems to scare her
    Loves thunder and storms, chases fireworks...

    I'm obviously too soft.

  4. #34
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    I'm obviously too soft.
    Why would you want your dog to "fear" you? Respect you and defer to you - yes, at least on important things.

    I don't want my dog to be frightened of me. It's a bit like - do you prefer to live in a country where everyone is scared of being "disappeared" by the government, or one where you don't fear the government, you get to choose your government and complain if they do something you don't agree with?

    Living in fear and opression - incites rebellion. And you don't want that from your dog.

  5. #35
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    Sorry, I should have worded it better...
    My loud angry voice doesn't seem to affect Gracie at all when she is doing or has done something wrong

    Bloody hell you've gotta be careful around here.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    Man, Gracie doesn't fear me at all but then again nothing seems to scare her
    Loves thunder and storms, chases fireworks...

    I'm obviously too soft.
    ha ha all good mate i know what ya meant. Gotta watch these Ladies mate !

    I once watched a blue heeler chase down a firework and attack it !! Couldnt believe what i was seeing.....compared to my scaredy cats


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    With the kid example I can understand that if it was the first time it happened and caught you by surprise, it would need to be swift so the timing was right and the dog knew the behaviour that it was being reprimanded for.
    Yep, got him in a blink of a eye. I think we where all in a bit of shock with what when down in about 4 or 5 seconds. He hasnt done it since but i dont give him a chance. He had one and blew it.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  8. #38
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    Yelling simply doesn't work on some dogs. And it won't work on most dogs if they are over-excited.

    Things like the spray bottle (even most water loving dogs don't like the sensation and sound of having water sprayed in their face), a collar grab, time-out or putting them on lead are usually more effective. Yelling is more beneficial for the owner to lower stressful than it is effective to achieve much. Though yelling "Oi" can just become another cue like "leave" if used often enough and followed up with consequences and or praise.

  9. #39
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    If my childhood dog, Skippa, was getting up to something she shouldn't a swift OI! would be enough to stop her in her tracks
    Not the case for G. She also thinks the spray bottle is an awesome game!

  10. #40
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    But Skippa probably had one or more experiences when not responding to 'Oi' got him into more trouble. It is a cue like any other. And for some dogs it takes longer to respond to a cue consistently than for others. My Banjo is a dog that some would call 'eager to please'. She is easy to train with mainly rewards, even though I still make sure we do lots of repetitions for the important ones before I phase out rewards.

    Our last foster pup didn't seem to care much at all about my emotional state in comparison. If I stopped being fun or got angry, she'd just go off to find something or someone more fun. So I had to make more of an effort to find out what she did care about and use that to bribe her. Either by taking it away from her, like taking away her freedom by putting her on the lead, or by making her do something I asked to get it. I found I had to use more of the first method with her to persuade her to make the right choices.

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