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Thread: dog punishment

  1. #21
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    Force is very rarely the answer. There are better ways. You just have to be patient with puppies and smack yourself for leaving things out they can tear up, or failing to get them outside in time to toilet.

  2. #22
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    Verbally telling a dog off is a form of punishment too.

    I usually just ignore the dogs when they done something bad when I wasn't there. Though of course in some cases they can sense my frustration if they wrecked something I was particularly attached to. Especially Banjo. She has that working dog sensitivity too and will walk away from me when she senses I'm angry, even if it's not directed at her. It's very sweet really. And so different from our foster pup who usually couldn't give a stuff about how anyone around her feels. Which is funny too.

  3. #23
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    So when is force (smack, hit, kick) appropriate ?

    Depends on how bad the deed is i reckon but there are times where a force full punishment is justified .

    I've had a dog on a lead that tried to have a go at a kid and he got a smack up the chops. A stern yelling, check or finger pointing in this situation seems pointless.

    Dont get me wrong... i dont hit my dogs for any old reason nor am i acting tough (heck that the last thing i'd expect you guys would think anyway LOL).

    Surely i'm not the only one who has layed a hand on their dogs in anger.


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  4. #24
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    I've had a dog on a lead that tried to have a go at a kid and he got a smack up the chops. A stern yelling, check or finger pointing in this situation seems pointless.
    This one is tricky... you have to be careful when a dog is trying to have a go at another dog/child/person (the enemy) that if you yell or clobber your dog - that your dog does not blame "the enemy" for that. How do you explain that your dog is being hurt because it's behaviour is unacceptable.

    If I yell at my dog in this situation she is absolutely certain I'm yelling at the enemy - and she yells and gnashes her teeth at them too.

    So today - we had the "I hate rude Labradors and poodle cross puppies" routine from my dog. I saw the rude Labrador coming - knew what my dog was going to do and I blocked her. I got between her and "the enemy". And I prevented her from having a go. Not real proud of it because she was pulling so hard on the (flat) collar she couldn't bark properly. But I just waited for her to calm down - took 2 seconds and then let the pressure off the collar. It works better when she's in the front attach harness - because if she lunges at anything she ends up facing me and not the enemy, and it doesn't reef on her neck.

    I'm pretty sure if I'd hit her - she would have blamed the other dog.

    Later - we had problems with a poodle cross and the owner - who did not stop his puppy from jumping all over every person and their dog - tho to me - clearly some of the dogs and people were not strong enough to be jumped all over. I was trying to pick up dog crap - saw his dog coming and just let mine off lead. And as it came charging up flat out, she skittled it. Slowed it down for about two seconds - ie her punishment of the enemy dog was not very effective and the dog didn't remember for very long. After I'd cleaned up the crap... the puppy enemy came at me and jumped on me - so I caught it by the collar and held it until it calmed down and did a nice sit for me (instead of squirming on its back and trying to chew everything - gotta love puppies not). And then I told it "good dog" and let it go. That - it remembered for longer. I did it twice more and it stopped jumping on me altogether - went and jumped on someone else.

    I told the owner that some of the people and dogs weren't comfortable with being jumped on and that he needed to prevent it. Eventually he decided he'd rather be on the other side of the oval than put his naughty puppy on lead. Which suited us.

    I agree that yelling or finger pointing at a naughty dog is pretty much a waste of time. I have been known to chuck a shoe or tennis ball or similar at a dog doing something bad (like eating roast chicken bones), mainly to get it off the contraband by way of distraction so I can clean up before it has another go. Plus I have found that surprise missiles - like a well aimed shoe - aren't blamed on me for some reason. The dog will usually avoid that particular spot. Works well to take the fun out of sleeping on ironing boards for cats - a handful of well aimed pegs.

  5. #25
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    I dont smack, shout or kick my dogs. But i do get annoyed, and stand still, temporarily beaten by owning 3 dogs, 1 of which has done something they shouldnt in my absence. Standing silently IS punishment for the older 2. They know immediately im not happy, and down go the tails and ears and they slope off. Shame, is at their age, is most likely was not them. The vilain here doesnt give a rats arse about my feelings, heck ive just come home, i must be dying to be slobbered as i have a suit on to ruin!

    With ignorant folks i live with...... who train like ceasar milan given half the chance in my absence. I and the dogs ignore it, them, and their training lol
    they cannot tell the difference after 7 yrs of living with the same dog, between his 'collapse' and a 'drop', to them, the dog is obedient, its gone to a drop position. *sighs*

    The dogs bounce back fast enough. mine are not little flowers, they are bold as brass. Brian is a little flower however, and his soul is easily crushed by confusion, and as a 18 month pup bordeaux, confusion is extreemly easily triggered. I guess he's surviving though.

    Must say, the water pistol idea cracks me up. Add water to my dogs, and its like instant zoomies, they'd love that sort of punishment. Whereas silent treatment / put away from my side for 5 minutes is unbearable. Funny how different dogs perceive same behaviours of humans.
    Newspaper roll across the butt - thats an invite to play tug of war here also.

  6. #26
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    I have actually "charged" at our foster pup. I ran at her making a deep loud noise and looking threatening. Once when she chased our cat who is already in a fragile mental state. The pup is much better with leaving the cat be now, when I'm around. Once when she pulled the container of dog mince off the bench when I had stepped 5 steps away from it to grab something. I can now turn my back to food on the bench without her immediately trying to grab it. I am sure someone with more knowledge, patience and time could have achieved the same results without having to resort to a display of primitive dominance. But it worked for me and I think it helped in teaching her respect for me and making her more willing to please. And of course I followed it up with lots of praise for sitting down patiently when I prepare her food and for not reacting when the cat walks past. Without that step it probably would have had only a very temporary effect. Punishment can be useful to make the dog stop what they are doing in order to create a situation to set them up for success. And every dog is probably different as to what works and what doesn't.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    Surely i'm not the only one who has layed a hand on their dogs in anger.
    No, I have done it. When I first got Harley I thought smacking was okay (was what I grew up with) so I use to smack him. He is a good dog now though so all he needs is a verbal correction. Bella will still get a tap on the ass when I catch her doing something super naughty. Normally I just need to growl at them though. They know when they have done something wrong...whether that is destroying clothing or something they aren't suppose to, I just pick up the item and in a cranky voice say "what did you do" lol Bella doesn't care cause she is a bitch like that but Harley sucks up to you aaaannnnnndddddd then we play.

    We have learnt to not leave things out and I have changed the way I hang washing or take it off the same day so that I don't lose any more bra's (the dogs favorite toy apparently) so we rarely have issues that need correcting anymore. I would tell your parents (if you can) that is it your dog and you want to train it your way.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  8. #28
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    OI, EXCUSE ME! works for us here as an admonishment and a reprimand and it changes their focus.. I have thrown the odd shoe too when Pretty and Bandit were full on duking it out for their position. No fights since they sorted it. When Jess and Jodi spat I just do the OI thing as I found using a rolled up newspaper was an escalation but hitting it against my own leg, the noise of it stopped them. These are just spats as Jodi can be a fair little cow and totally deserves them.
    Oh FFS works too, lol.

    I just made sure they had no access to stuff that mattered when they were in their destructive young phose which has totally been gone a couple of years..touch wood. There is no point in punishing well after a fact as they have no idea why.

    The odd accident inside I call them over, point to it, ask them who did this then, Hmmmm? I then give the toilet word and they go outside.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  9. #29
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    The only time i have hit Koda is when he has tried to hump my leg. He went through a phase of it when he was younger, he now only does it it he hasn't seen me for more than a week. Verbal punishment didn't snap him out of it, and no matter how hard i try i can not get my leg out from his grip!
    A quick slap with a loud 'NO' snaps him out of it, then i go inside and don't come out again until he is calm. And then of course, when he is calm and being polite around me he gets LOTS of praise so he knows that this is how he should behave around me

  10. #30
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    I am enjoying these stories of doggy naughtiness.

    I listened to an "All In the Mind" podcast about how animals think and feel today. It was a repeat of one I'd heard earlier, but I picked up a bunch of new things.

    Animal minds - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    It was mostly an interview with Virginia Morell who had recently published "Animal Wise, the thoughts and emotions of our fellow creatures" published by Black Inc.

    The new stuff I noticed this morning was how old scientific ideas hold up new ones. For instance - animal behaviour scientists were so caught up in not "anthropromorphising" animals ie giving dogs reasons for doing things that belong to humans that they ignored where our emotions and motivations came from.

    So at one time scientists thought that animals entirely responded to a stimulus in a way that helped them "evolve". They didn't consider the idea that some animals (eg talking grey parrots, and dogs) can make quite complicated interpretations of a "stimulus" or series of stimuli and consider the consequence of a number of possible actions and then do whatever seems the most profitable at the time.

    There was an example of a low status chimp - not giving the food alert that benefits the entire group, but sneaking a banana all for herself and being really quiet about it.

    And I thought of my own dog's examples of fibbing... eg play bow at another dog to get let off lead, so she can go sniff...

    And the one where a dog will go bark at the door to get everybody off the couch so they can get the best spot...

    I really should document some of these. My dog fibs a lot about many things. How many dogs do you see tell you that their owner NEVER feeds them? And that it's ok to cadge treats off strangers.

    So, I've heard often that dogs don't feel embarrassment, shame (guilt?) or jealousy but I'm not so sure. They certainly do notice when you're angry and they either join in against "the enemy" with some righteous anger of their own, or they try to make you feel better with their sad cute face. And grovel. The grovel is something my dog does with other dogs to calm them down too.

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