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Thread: mauled by own dog

  1. #1

    Default mauled by own dog

    it's pretty rare but there are reports of people being mauled to death by their own dog. how does that happen? does it have to do with training or improper socialization or anything else like neutering/spaying or a combination of factors? is a dogs behaviour really as predictable as we like to think?

    Darla Napora: Pregnant woman dies after being mauled by pet dog in living room | Mail Online
    Rescued Pit Bull Kills Owner Joseph D. Hines
    Pit bull attack victim clings to life. Dog will be destroyed - KGUN9.com
    Dog blamed for Spotsylvania man's death | WJLA.com
    Was woman killed by her own dog? - National Animal News | Examiner.com
    Police: Man killed by family dog : News : CarolinaLive.com
    Woman Killed By Pit Bulls She Raised From Puppies

    on a lighter note my puppy hates being walked. he goes for a bit and then he plants his butt down and refuses to go any further. he walks fine but he pulls horribly on the way back home.

    here is a pic of him.IMG_20131231_194819_354.jpg

  2. #2
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    I'm not an expert in these types of things, but i'll say my extent of knowledge.

    I didn't fully read all the articles you posted i just skimmed over them, but first up, no matter how much someone loves their dog and no matter how much they think they can trust it, no one should ever put 100% trust that dog will not act in unpredictable ways. Attacks such as the ones in the articles, could have been from a lack of training and socialisation. From what i read it sounded like a few of these dogs were rescues, so who knows how these dogs were treated by their original owners. They may have been abused, and already had fear of people implanted in them. Perhaps the owner wasn't reading their dog's behaviour correctly.. the dog could have been displaying signs of aggression, nervousness or even pain... and if the owner didn't notice that then the owner could have easily done something that just set the dog off. A dog mauling its owner is very rare, however bites can and do happen. It just shows the importance of understanding a dogs body language.

    Not sure how to help you with your walking issues, you've got a cute pup on your hands though, I can see a lot of Akita in him

  3. #3
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    From the article I linked here...
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/bsl-dog-l...stillwell.html

    #1 - There is nobody strong and able enough to prevent/stop the attack. 87%
    #2 - The victim is a stranger to the dog. 85% (but the attack can be at the dog's home)
    #3 - the dog is not desexed - 84%
    #4 - the victim can't / doesn't behave appropriately around dogs
    #5 - The dog is a backyard garden ornament - and deprived of human contact.
    #6 - The owner has mismanaged the dog in the past (37.5%)

    Darla Napora: Pregnant woman dies after being mauled by pet dog in living room | Mail Online
    Fail on 1, 3, unknown on 3, 5, 6. Not enough info to say why this one happened.

    Rescued Pit Bull Kills Owner Joseph D. Hines
    No useful info - can't tell why.

    Pit bull attack victim clings to life. Dog will be destroyed - KGUN9.com
    This is described as a pitbull x labrador, so the headline is wrong for starters. Hard to tell on the rest of the points. Except that the report said the dog had recently been desexed and maybe that was why (pain killers wearing off?). Doesn't make sense to me.

    Dog blamed for Spotsylvania man's death | WJLA.com
    Definite fail on #5 - dog was a garden ornament - and the owner brought it inside. So fails on #2 and #6 possible as well. Unknown on the rest. 6 weeks old is too young to be removed from the litter which suggests a back yard breeder and possible temperament issues with the dog.


    Was woman killed by her own dog? - National Animal News | Examiner.com
    possible fail on #1 and #4 but hard to tell, and no info on the other points.

    Police: Man killed by family dog : News : CarolinaLive.com
    - no information at all - possible fail on all points.

    Woman Killed By Pit Bulls She Raised From Puppies
    - women probably had a seizure so definite fail on #1, Dogs never taken for walks - so possibly number 5 and possibly fail on 2,3,4 as well.
    ie the dogs may not have recognised her if she was having a fit. Or they may have perceived her as a weak member of the pack and needed killing.

    It is interesting that all your links are for america and for pitbull (or pitbull crosses).

    I agree that the majority of dog attacks (fatal or not) are by dogs in the family home and they often come from owners doing dumb things - like leaving children alone with dogs. Children are savage and dogs do defend themselves - one rottweiler had to be PTS because the child stabbed it in the ear with a pencil so the dog retaliated... hardly fair. The pencil was found in an autopsy of the dog probably looking for some sort of brain tumor.

    This is from an RSPCA paper on BSL (breed specific legistiaton)
    Nationally, there have been at least 33 dog attack deaths in Australia since 1979, but apart from the dog that killed Ayen Chol, only one other dog has been described as a pit bull cross.
    And this is from the AVA artilce on BSL
    http://www.ava.com.au/sites/default/...on%20FINAL.pdf

    The breed of dog most often involved in dog attack - varies with time. Ie it's a fashion thing. Dogs that bite - most often live in poor neighbourhoods. The breed of dog that bites - is hard to reliably identify especially with a breed that has no pedigree register like pitbulls and back yard bred staffies and rotties...

    Pitbulls and Pitbull crosses are one of the most popular breeds in the USA. The more popular the breed - the more likely it is involved in dog attacks. And the bigger the dog - the more severe the damage.

    There have been 33 fatal dog attacks in Australia since 1997, and pitbull like dogs have only been involved in two of those. Mastiff crosses, Husky, rotties, GSDs and other breeds have also been involved. It's hard to find anything specific because there isn't any reliable record keeping. Part of this problem is - there isn't reliable info on the breeds much of the time. Who knows what breed the pet shop or back yard special is really?

    Husky kills a baby in Perth:
    No Cookies | Perth Now

    By comparison cars kill more than 1000 people a year in Australia and so do swimming pools and beaches. 291 people drowned in Australia between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2013. And about 18 people were killed by their quad bikes in 2012 alone.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-01-2014 at 11:37 PM.

  4. #4
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    There is always more to these stories than we're told and we know how good the media is for making up dog attack stories. I have owned several breeds over the years...Dobermann...Rottweiler and of cause the GSD and others. I can tell you without a doubt these breeds do not turn on their owners...when raised as part of the family...but even the cruelly treated ones are still great dogs in the right hands.
    At all breeds training a few years ago I saw this guy hit his GSD cross over the face with the lead because the dog wouldn't sit...you can imagine what that poor dogs life was like.

    Our Rottie (God rest her soul) came from a shelter...she'd been bashed...starved and kept on a chain on concrete for the first 14 mths of her life. She was very scared of me...did she try to bite me...no. It took 6 mths before she lost her fear and for the rest of her life she was a very loving...gentle girl who is sadly missed.
    Chloe was kept in the backyard for the first 6 mths of her life with no contact with people or other dogs... then dumped in the pound...did she try to bite me...no. I treat my dogs and raise them like children...yes I know what the "Experts" say but their wrong.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

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    We once had a dog that bit us. My mum loved animals but didn't know anything about them nor did we as kids. I remember a situation where my sister and I used him in our childish arguments. She'd tell him to get off the couch, I'd immediately invite him back up. No wonder the poor thing was so confused he lashed out. My mum brought him to the pound when he bit one of my sister's friends. I remember it like it was yesterday. The girl (she was 12) came into our kitchen and sternly ordered the dog to go to his bed, for fun. The dog was only ever sent to his bed as punishment. So we convinced her she had treated the dog unfairly and she finally agreed to 'say sorry'. She went over to his bed, tried to pat him and he bit her. To this day I think she deserved it. She fainted at the sight of blood though and created a huge drama. The next day the dog was gone and I never spoke to her again.

    So yeah, I'm sure there are still lots of families out there who should not own dogs and subject them to similar abuse until they crack.
    Last edited by Beloz; 01-02-2014 at 09:12 AM.

  6. #6
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    She'd tell him to get off the couch, I'd immediately invite him back up. No wonder the poor thing was so confused he lashed out
    That's an excuse. A dog is never to lay teeth on a human being unless trained to do say, end of story. Create a grey area with a dog and they will take advantage of it.

    People are probably going to hate me for what I'm going to say, but so be it.

    - Massive lack of socialisation and proper training for the breed that has been purchased. Real training, as in don't you dare lay a tooth on anyone type training. None of this wishy washy squeal, toy redirection etc etc

    - People forgetting a dog is a predatory animal with drive and a massive set of teeth. The romantic notion your dog loves you and will never harm you is just that - a notion.

    - People not properly researching breeds, and breed traits being 'watered down' for modern marketing purposes. You know what, sometimes you shouldnt own a mastiff, or a pitbull, or a rottweiler, or a terrier etc. Because you can't handle it and it will turn to poop. Again we're coming back to a rescue argument on this one. Large powerful breeds untrained, unsuitably mixed dogs of unknown heritage handed out as 'perfect family pets'.

    - The constant perpetuation of dogs with bad temperaments. Both through rescue organisations and through this massive boom of backyard breeding of just plain bad temperament dogs. I see a lot of rescue dogs that frankly are not right, and will never be right. But then we want to save everything because to say a dog deserves to be put to sleep makes you a horrible person, particularly puppies. I've seen some scary, scary dogs bred or rescued. We need to back to the old days of culling bad health and temperament, and culling off unknown and bad mixes if they show signs of poor temperament or low suitability to be rehomed.

    - Modern Training - dogs are furchildren, don't stress them out, don't hurt their feelings, don't make them do anything they don't want to do, no correction, no punishment!

    - As for spey and neutering, we're pushing for it now more then ever. If hormones were the cause of this would we not see less of this happening, not more? We need to stop pushing early desexing, not drive it further.

    Dogs don't just snap for no reason. I have known dogs that have just changed but a brain scan revealed, particularly in one dog, tumours that were causing the dog to act without control. Most of the time people don't notice the warning signs of them opening the door to this happening down the track. Then their own blindness and denial prevents them realising it was a long time coming.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not advocating by any stretch of the imagination abuse, over force etc. I'm advocating a wake up and realism in what we're creating with our modern fluffy notions. We're forgetting the core make up of the canine and we're all paying for it. No one should go to hospital for a few stitiches from a 'family pet' let alone be mauled to death.

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    Default Sad but it happens for many reasons

    I had a dog pts because he was a temperamental problem and couldn't be trusted with children. i had 2 primary aged children. In my view a dog I think is likely to react with a bite has no business being in a family home. He was a chronic escaper and I had no idea what else to do 20 years ago no rehoming no trainers. I picked badly and failed to train and exercise him enough looking back. I waited 20 years and was very very careful this time around. I now know everything i did wrong and it was my fault and he would have been fine if I had time and knowledge to train him properly.
    I can imagine a train of circumstances when things could have been very pear shaped which is why we made the decision we did. Hindsight is wondrous but I worked with what I has at the time and I would still remove a dangerous dog from the gene pool. Now however I wouldn't have chosen that one and would now know how to train it if I had.
    My ignorance at the time depresses me.
    Last edited by farrview; 01-02-2014 at 10:08 AM.

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    I don't believe in 'my dog would never...' either. Every being has a breaking point where they will lash out and dogs are no different. I guess the trick is to keep the threshold nice and high, yet, I realise on the question how to achieve this opinions differ. I don't think there are easy answers to this issue, it's far too complex and what's good and right for one dog will fail with another.

    Socialisation, yes of course! That's the basic. But I think there is a point when you just have to accept that you can't 'perfect' every dog. Breed, temperament, health status, etc. do have an impact as well. I love Nero to bits but I don't trust him alone with children because I know that his threshold when it comes to strangers-trying-to-pet him is pretty low. Like every dog he will bite when he feels threatened and in certain situations he feels threatened too quickly.

    I therefore think the best every owner can do is to truly know their dog. Understand how they tick and what makes them loose it. Know their frustration tolerance and act accordingly. That involves to spend time with your dog. A lot of time - and not only in your safe backyard but also out and about in new and unfamiliar situations. On holidays, on car trips in crowds in different buildings and ... whatever! I still think that the best way to avoid attacks is to make your dog a part of your life as much as you can. Not only for socialisation purposes but also to get to know him.

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    Nekhbet, that was just an example of how clueless we were. This dog was a Cocker Spaniel and we even managed to stuff that up. We should not have been allowed to own a dog without being forced to attend training about dog behaviour and training. We also had no idea how to select a suitable dog. After that we had a Pekinese that had belonged to an old lady and came with the warning that he bit anyone trying to touch him when he was under a chair or table. We got a Labrador from the pound that destroyed our kitchen in a day. It turned out we were the 6th to bring him back to the pound. That situation still happens at pounds.

    Most local rescues I know are pretty good at weeding out the bad seeds. They don't have the resources to waste time and money on aggressive dogs. Ours won't even take on dog aggressive dogs or escape artist. But the pounds do not vet dogs or new owners at all and won't even warn new owners about potential risk.

    ETA: I was only a young child when all this happened. My mother was to blame, but she was in no way an exception in those days.
    Last edited by Beloz; 01-02-2014 at 04:03 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    There is always more to these stories than we're told and we know how good the media is for making up dog attack stories. I have owned several breeds over the years...Dobermann...Rottweiler and of cause the GSD and others. I can tell you without a doubt these breeds do not turn on their owners...when raised as part of the family...but even the cruelly treated ones are still great dogs in the right hands.
    Dog almighty. I can't believe the naivety of this statement. So dangerous too.

    Any dog of any breed or x breed can turn in the wrong combination of circumstances. There are always rogues too.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-02-2014 at 02:22 PM. Reason: fix the quote boundaries

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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