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Thread: mauled by own dog

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    I give up.
    I've owned plenty of Dobies - both show line and working line. I've trained plenty of GSD's and Rotties.

    I agree, the Dobies brain does not grow to large for its skull causing the dog to have a psychotic break and kill everything in sight. Nor is the old "they only kill their masters" saying true.

    BUT, I think you are mad if you think these breeds are any less likely to behave inappropriately in the wrong hands. In the right hands, they are terrific breeds, like all other breeds. In the wrong hands, they can be as damaging as anything else.

    I trust my Dobies, and one of them has actually bitten me quite badly. The fact I still have arms tells me he probably pulled his punches in a situation where he was terrified and redirected. That's a dog I trust because he has shown me his level of control. Far from perfect, sure, but there you have it, I trust him because I know him.

    Leave him alone with kids or other people I don't know? No, never. Make assumptions that things will always be precisely as they are now? No, never. Assume my dog will never bite me? No, never.

    But I do trust him to behave in predictable ways.
    Last edited by Villain & Flirtt; 01-07-2014 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Spelling

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    I've owned plenty of Dobies - both show line and working line. I've trained plenty of GSD's and Rottnes.

    I agree, the Dobies brain does not grow to large for its skull causing the dog to have a psychotic break and kill everything in sight. Nor is the old "they only kill their masters" saying true.

    BUT, I think you are mad if you think these breeds are any less likely to behave inappropriately in the wrong hands. In the right hands, they are terrific breeds, like all other breeds. In the wrong hands, they can be as damaging as anything else.

    I trust my Dobies, and one of them has actually bitten me quite badly. The fact I still have arms tells me he probably pulled his punches in a situation where he was terrified and redirected. That's a dog I trust because he has shown me his level of control. Far from perfect, sure, but there you have it, I trust him because I know him.

    Leave him alone with kids or other people I don't know? No, never. Make assumptions that things will always be precisely as they are now? No, never. Assume my dog will never bite me? No, never.

    But I do trust him to behave in predictable ways.
    You have the exact same opinion on this matter as I do, just you worded it a lot better than I did Thanks V&F

  3. #33
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    You lurker you V&F - miss you round here.

    Well said. One thing to speak for your own dogs, but another to make sweeping generalizations about breeds, breeders and puppies - good or bad.

    I know an extremely well bred Golden Retriever who is dog aggressive - mostly because his owner never sets any limits on his behaviour from when he was a small puppy. She thought he would be a nice friendly dog just because he was a GR and she didn't have to do anything. She was given the opportunity to train with a fantastic dog trainer here, but declined. I would have taken up the offer if it had been made to me.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    I've owned plenty of Dobies - both show line and working line. I've trained plenty of GSD's and Rottnes.

    I agree, the Dobies brain does not grow to large for its skull causing the dog to have a psychotic break and kill everything in sight. Nor is the old "they only kill their masters" saying true.

    BUT, I think you are mad if you think these breeds are any less likely to behave inappropriately in the wrong hands. In the right hands, they are terrific breeds, like all other breeds. In the wrong hands, they can be as damaging as anything else.

    I trust my Dobies, and one of them has actually bitten me quite badly. The fact I still have arms tells me he probably pulled his punches in a situation where he was terrified and redirected. That's a dog I trust because he has shown me his level of control. Far from perfect, sure, but there you have it, I trust him because I know him.

    Leave him alone with kids or other people I don't know? No, never. Make assumptions that things will always be precisely as they are now? No, never. Assume my dog will never bite me? No, never.

    But I do trust him to behave in predictable ways.
    I agree with you on many aspects but I would have to say that I would 100% trust my current dogs not to bite me. Even my fear aggressive dog when she was shrieking from fear and emptying her anal glands on a number of very stressful occassions when I had to be really hands on with her, did not bite me ever.

    I did have a situation where a dog was about to redirect under stress but she recognised my skin in an instant and avoided.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-07-2014 at 01:23 PM.

  5. #35
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    No one can ever give a blanket guarantee about any breed of dogs. Just as silly an argument as all pit bulls are bad. NO I don't want that revisited in this thread, lol but it is just as silly a statement.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    No one can ever give a blanket guarantee about any breed of dogs. Just as silly an argument as all pit bulls are bad. NO I don't want that revisited in this thread, lol but it is just as silly a statement.
    No you cant possibly do that because you cant control the genetics and the training or who owns the dog.

    One can however know ones own dogs pretty well if you are an experienced owner. Well enough to know how they are likely to react towards you in certain situations.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    No you cant possibly do that because you cant control the genetics and the training or who owns the dog.

    One can however know ones own dogs pretty well if you are an experienced owner. Well enough to know how they are likely to react towards you in certain situations.
    Totally agree.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #38

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    Well whilst I agree that you can never be 100% sure that a living creature won't hurt you (part of the fun right?) I do feel some dogs are much, much safer than others and this has nothing to do with their breed. Yes there's training and socialisation and ensuring your dog is balanced and respects you etc. But taking all this aside, in my opinion the nerves of the dog have a lot to do with how dangerous the dog can be. These days, particularly in one of my favourite breeds, the Doberman, you see a lot of dogs bred with thin nerves. This is done intentionally but unknowingly, what I mean is that there are breeders who think a dog that appears to be reactive and puts on a good show to speak is a more protective, true to temperament example of the breed. I disagree 100%. Having thin nerves means the dog reacts to tiny stimulus in a big way and gets so caught up in the whole thing that you can't reason with it until it calms down (which typically requires the removal of the stimulus). You see breeders who are so impressed by their dogs and yet I see these as best case useless, worst case dangerous contributions to the breed.

    Many of the dobermans I see today either completely lack any drive altogether but can make good family pets, or alternatively, are very thin nerved and become completely unpredictable under stress. And it's not just Dobermans. You see lots of dogs that under any stress just lash out at the closest thing they can reach.

    And it's not something you can train out of the dog either which as far as I'm concerned, makes it one of the worst issues a dog can have.

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