Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Dog proof flooring

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    The dark bamboo is apparently heat treated which makes it softer.

    Thanks for the info about the Janka rating. You can order some samples very cheaply from eBay, so I'll order some laminate ones and do a scratch test. The online articles I read from people with (large) indoor dogs, seem to agree on the laminate as a cheap and easy to maintain alternative to wood. And laminate gets an AC (Abrasion Class) rating, which seems more useful than the Janka rating. I'd like to get the commercial grade AC4 stuff, but may have to settle for the AC3, which is easier to find.

    Now I just have to wait for my bonus at work before I go searching for the best deal! But I'll call around for some quotes in the mean time.

    While the foster pup amuses herself with pulling threads out of the carpet when she's bored... Haha!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    The harder the floor - the better it is at smashing things you drop on it, including your elderly granny or mum.

    So it's a trade off, the harder and strong the floor - the more it will wear you instead of the other way about. My mum has cork tiles over brushed concrete - it was supposed to be just brushed concrete but the plumbers left their tools on it while it was still wet - despite it being covered up and roped off. Then they tried an acrylic coating but it went orange peel - probably because they put it on too soon ie the concrete was still too damp for that treatment. And then mum got what I wanted all along - cork tiles - so you can drop a jar of chutney on it and it doesn't smash. And she's less likely to bust a hip if she falls on it too.

    haven't noticed any problems with dog stains from several visiting dogs. But they prefer to pee on the rugs anyway.

    I've got Baltic pine floors - most of which is pushing 100 years old. All of it has been recently polished and given epoxy varnish - which is hard and flexible. It does look worn but you gotta expect that with age. The best thing I did for it was get rid of the gravel paths.

    One of my friends is getting grass matting over concrete - which is a good compromise. You just get new stuff when that gets too menky.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I made the mistake if getting road base on both sides of the house. It now looks like a moon landscape...

  4. #24

    Default

    Your ‘moonscape’ can be rectified – but it will need a fair bit of work and sweat !

    Road base plus concrete – watered down and then compacted – can make a good driveway or pathway. I have done it at my place – but on a much larger scale than yours – talking many tons of product here !.

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=r...=ctr:countryAU

    Maybe look at putting pavers down !

    Paving 101 *- Better Homes and Gardens - Yahoo!7

    Hopefully - you have been in the house long enough to work out how water gets away from your house and land – because you need to take that into account when looking at pathway gradients and levels.
    smiley-eatdrink004.gif

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Yes, it's pavers I want. But I can't decide if I also want to grow some shade loving plants against the fence there. I'm crap at decisions like that, so nothing happens and the yard looks terrible!

    I've a drain in the back lawn because we're on a hill. I don't seem to get much water at the side of the house.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    It's good to protect the sides of your house with pavers or concrete. Putting garden up against the house walls invites mould and damp inside, salt damp and termites. Not fun.

    You can get water permeable pavers. I just used concrete pavers. I can still grow stuff next to the fence or in pots if I want to.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Yes, I was thinking against the fence.

    Anywho, I'll do the inside first. And then I'll have to save again.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •