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Thread: Dog proof flooring

  1. #11
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    Was going to say who cares? My house now the kids have gone are for us and the dogs, I spot care as they happen but yep, there are stains. It is a different thing though wanting it to look good for selling.

    Why not continue as you are then cheap carpet it before you sell? Odds on people will change it whatever you do.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    We have engineered hardwood flooring and I do not recommend for inside dogs. It scratches soooo easily which is why our guys aren't allowed inside anymore. My best and safest bet would be tiles personally. Easy to clean and hard wearing. Not sure on costs though.
    And - here I was thinking that your dogs were outside because of the 'new baby' - but all it was - was because of the flooring that was put in your place - that was soooo wanted !

    More than a tad disappointed with this !

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    We have engineered hardwood flooring and I do not recommend for inside dogs. It scratches soooo easily which is why our guys aren't allowed inside anymore..
    I think that is sad.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #14
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  5. #15
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    Thanks Margoo, that's a great source. I'm going to have to call around to get some quotes and do some calculations. I've no idea what laying floor boards would cost in labour for example. Labour costs for tiles seem to be quite expensive, but the tiles themselves can be much cheaper than wood. I'll also have to check which one world be better at temperature regulation. I thought wood would be, but it looks like tiles may actually be better.

    My mum claims the more expensive laminate may be a good option too, if it also gets treated after laying.

    Sigh! But the main reason why I'm doing this is that I finally want to not have to worry about the dogs damaging the floor. That for me is one of the biggest advantages of owning my own home. That and finally, finally being able to install a pet door! And having 5 pets in a small house. Lol

  6. #16
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    That is why I feel so lucky not to have to worry too much about mine. I had a kid spill ice cream, an adult spill beer and later a dog chuck up after I stupidly forgot and allowed them to lick tiny adhering bits from the sides of a tiramasou dish and I mean tiny as the bowl was pretty well scraped and one does not do fat well. (Di the idiot) Spot clean and disinfect and a NO second rule for dropped food or cutlery here works well. As I am out of the age range thank goodness, no crawling babies allowed on it either just in case. If they are here, once in a blue moon I spread down a large sheet, lol.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    And - here I was thinking that your dogs were outside because of the 'new baby' - but all it was - was because of the flooring that was put in your place - that was soooo wanted !

    More than a tad disappointed with this !
    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    I think that is sad.
    Really? Makes me sad too but hey, when you have just spent 8k+ on nice flooring plus all of the effort I put into it before the floors went down I want to keep them looking as good as I can. Plus with having the baby I don't really want him covered in dog hair, the dogs all over his stuff or on the furniture.... the cat does a good enough job of that.

    We worked very hard to get the house looking like it is now and I am sure when we sell one day the new owners will appreciate not having the floors scratched up.

    I have no regrets, they have adjusted well and it is hard enough to get them into the rumpus room on super hot days as they would prefer to stay outside.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  8. #18
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    The foster pup has been bringing fresh bones in and Banjo started copying her, which is really, really not good for the carpet! And to top it off, the foster chewed the plug off the carpet shampooer the other day.

    Jadie, babies and kids that have close contact with pets have a decreased risk of getting allergies and asthma! My daughter grew up on dog food... I just vacuumed and mopped more when she was crawling. But I believe there is a good reason why babies are attracted to dirt. It's good for them! And some dog slobber never hurt anyone either.

    I read some more articles online and found out that light bamboo is harder than dark, but still not as hard as the better hardwood. Stranded bamboo is very hard, but then it loses the whole natural product attraction. So I'm back at laminate now. You can pick it up so cheaply, even second hand. Or just leftovers. And the AC3 rated stuff is apparently great with dogs. Hard to scratch and easy to clean.

  9. #19
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    Ooh trust me Zac gets his fair share of dog slobber. He loves the dogs, watches them where ever they go! They aren't too interested in him yet. Harley would be if he could throw the ball though. He puts it down in front of him and then stares waiting for him to do something. Bella just goes crazy with the licking and then goes back to doing her thing.... Lol sorry to go off topic. Back onto it.

    We laid our own floors. If you have any mates that are handy that way it would save you a bundle. It did take us (by us I mean Ray) quite a while as the cutting and measuring awkward spaces was a bit of a pain. But we saved heaps doing it.

  10. #20
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    I wouldn't be too worried about how 'hard' flooring is. It really has nothing to do with whether it scratches easily. We bought stranded bamboo making the same mistake. But if you have a closer look at product guarantee you'll see that they never cover scratching of the surface. They all cover only structural damage. So the 'hardness factor' or Janka Test is only about how many kg you can apply before the flooring gets a dent. And sure enough... after four years there is not a single dent in our floor - but countless scratches.

    Dark Bamboo is just stained bright bamboo as far as I know. And it scratches just as easily - but scratches on a stained dark surface (bamboo or wood) are always more visible than scratches on a light surface.

    In our old rental place we had pine flooring. Not very hard according to the ratings and it also had scratches. But because it was a natural product and not stained it didn't matter. It just blended in with a little time.

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