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Thread: Do you watch it?

  1. #1
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    Default Do you watch it?

    I hate to bring this up around Christmas, but its been on my mind a lot lately and i'm just wondering what you guys would do.

    When it comes time for you to have a dog (or any pet for that matter) put to sleep... do you stay in the room and watch or do you leave?
    When we had our old Border Collie X put down many years ago no one from my family watched, i was too young to make a decision for myself but i know that no one else watched. Its been on my mind a lot because i am going to have to make that decision with my ferret soon and i don't know whether to watch it or not... I feel like it would be an incredibly difficult thing to have to watch but i have this weird idea that it would be nicer for the animal if i was there with them. I've seen animals put down while i was on work experience so that isn't new to me, but it is a whole different thing when the animal is your own pet...

  2. #2

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    I was there with Jack holding him till he had gone. Would have had it no other way, I would have felt very guilty if I'd not stayed with him for those last moments and made sure he was comfortable, happy and hopefully unaware what was going on. I have no doubt that if I was dying he would have been there by my side. Also good closure I guess. No doubt others think differently but that's my view.

    Another little extra nicety is to have the vet come to your home so your pet is happy in his/her own environment and not stressed out in a sterile vet clinic.
    Last edited by mymatejack; 12-23-2013 at 07:33 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I was there with Jack holding him till he had gone. Would have had it no other way, I would have felt very guilty if I'd not stayed with him for those last moments and made sure he was comfortable, happy and hopefully unaware what was going on. I have no doubt that if I was dying he would have been there by my side. Also good closure I guess. No doubt others think differently but that's my view.

    Another little extra nicety is to have the vet come to your home so your pet is happy in his/her own environment and not stressed out in a sterile vet clinic.
    That's beautiful MMJ! I sure hope i have the courage to do what you did when the time comes.

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    I think it depends on how you can handle it. If you're likely to have a breakdown in the vets room it's probably better to say goodbye outside. You're of no help to your dog if you can't stay calm because you're such a mental wreck. But if you think you can pull yourself together for your mate then I think it's better to be there.

    So far I was never in the position. When my old mare died I was 14.000 km away - but I know that one of my best friends who cared for her the last years - was with her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    I think it depends on how you can handle it. If you're likely to have a breakdown in the vets room it's probably better to say goodbye outside. You're of no help to your dog if you can't stay calm because you're such a mental wreck. But if you think you can pull yourself together for your mate then I think it's better to be there.

    So far I was never in the position. When my old mare died I was 14.000 km away - but I know that one of my best friends who cared for her the last years - was with her.
    You make a good point Margoo... I would imagine that if the owner was having a meltdown it wouldn't be doing much to help keep the dog calm. I do tend to be a bit of an emotional person... if it were either of my dogs i like to think that i could be there with them but realistically i doubt i'd be mentally stable enough. I feel like i'll be a bit better with Minky... but i guess i'll see how i feel when the time comes.

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    I would stay for the reasons MMJ mentions. I am good at suppressing my emotions when it's crunch time. Most parents can do that when it concerns their young kids too if they end up in hospital for example, so it's not an exceptional skill. And pets are probably even more tuned into our emotions than kids.

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    the way i see it, my best mate has always been their for me, every step of the way, so much loyalty and my best mate. I was their in the beginning, and i'll be their in the end. No matter how hard it is, i owe her that!
    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion" Author Unknown

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    Yep I think you guys have helped me make up my mind. You're all right, my pets deserve to have me with them to the end. Especially my dogs no matter how hard i know that would be if i'm ever faced with that decision. Both Dodge and Koda have helped me through some of the roughest times in my life, they deserve nothing less than me trying to repay that loyalty.

    As for Minky, when the time comes in the next few weeks, I will be with her to the end.

  9. #9

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    'maddogdodge' - something I came across quite a while ago about pets and death which I hope will help you as it has helped me on many occasions.


    Respect For The Passage – written by - Donna M. Raditic, DVM, CVA, Integrative Medicine Service, Resident in Nutrition Veterinary Teaching Hospital, The University of Tennessee

    I would like to take this opportunity to reflect on a very difficult topic - death. Each one of us pet owners will be faced with the loss of our companion. It is not unusual for our personal views regarding our own mortality to become involved in the decisions we make for our pets.

    Some owners are unable to let go of their animal companions and cling to every last shred of hope. These people need confident direction and understanding to allow their pets to die with peace and dignity.

    I have long ago realized, it is my place to let these owners know it is time to stop hoping and allow their friend to pass on peacefully. We need to take care of them in their dying. Because of the shorter life span of animals, I will outlive most of my patients. I see them born and I see them through their death. This is very different from human medical practitioners who still insist on treating death as a disease, rarely seeing a patient’s life cycle in its entirety.

    Owners often ask me how I can be sure it is time for their friend to die. In Chinese medicine it is believed dying is associated with the loss of shen, the vital life force that is seen in a patient’s eyes. Having stared into many dying eyes, I have come to believe this is true.

    I also understand the physiological changes a patient experiences from life threatening diseases – pain, weakness, nausea, respiratory distress, numbness, and unrest. I also spend time talking to my owners who will give me a clear picture of their friend’s quality of life and his priorities in life.

    This is different for each patient – some dogs need to take that daily excursion to the mailbox while others are content to curl up on the couch with a view of Mom and Dad getting the mail. Your cat may find it very important to make the upstairs trek to the litterbox, while others will accept you moving it to the kitchen, underfoot and all.

    Each one with special needs and individual personalities, your pet will try to make these decisions very clear. And if you can’t understand or see clearly through your tears, we are here to guide you through this process.

    There are some premises which all of us must respect. Animals do not fear death and that is not because of ignorant bliss, but rather an appreciation of the power of nature and her continuous cycles: the planets revolving around the sun, the moon revolving around the earth, the change of the seasons, night turning to day, water to vapor then back again as rain, and on and on and on. They are still connected to the laws of nature and know no fear; they just accept what they cannot change.

    Sometimes my patients are anxious, whining and restless, but I have come to realize they are worried about their people! Their Mom and Dad are crying, afraid, and unsure.

    Is it not the pet’s job to lick their tears away and wag their tail so hard that their parents will start to smile? But they can’t, they are dying and it seems like their parents need them more than ever. It is important for owners to know they need to let their friend move on; his duty of bringing unconditional love and joy has been fulfilled.

    A second premise must be mentioned. Our friends do not wish to live forever. They are not looking for quantity, only a quality of life. They have a purpose here; they are temporary gifts which must be returned.

    Our pets take away our pain, suffering, loneliness, selfishness, anger and misfortune. With a warm purr or happy woof, they try to teach each of us how to live as better human beings.

    If we listen to their quiet yet profound message, then a pet’s life will be eternal and meaningful. We need to live our lives as well, sharing the simple unconditional love and acceptance we have enjoyed from our furry companions.
    It is never easy and it is always sad for us - so be kind to yourself !

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    'maddogdodge' - something I came across quite a while ago about pets and death which I hope will help you as it has helped me on many occasions.


    Respect For The Passage – written by - Donna M. Raditic, DVM, CVA, Integrative Medicine Service, Resident in Nutrition Veterinary Teaching Hospital, The University of Tennessee



    It is never easy and it is always sad for us - so be kind to yourself !
    That is beautiful Riley! Brought tears to my eyes! Thanks for sharing it!

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