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Thread: New Dog Owner

  1. #1

    Default New Dog Owner

    Hi All,
    I am new at this so please bare with me and my questions.
    My partner and i are getting a Bull Mastiff cross Dogue De Bordeaux puppy he will be 8 weeks old when we get him and there are a few things i want to know.
    Firstly i keep getting told various things on the feeding thing. I would have thought a dog that can grow to be his expected size should eat 3 times a day? i also would think that atleast one of those meals should include wet food / meat?
    Secondly when do you recommend getting these breeds desexed? i hear they can get aggressive if you leave it too long?
    Any help would be great.

    Thanks
    Jess

  2. #2
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    My goodness that is going to be a big dog. You need to do some searches on this forum apart from chatting with a good vet. I know dogs who are going to grow large have special needs for food and exercise, take care and do your homework.
    Whether you feed cooked or raw, dry or wet you willneed to find out the best for your preferences and the dogs health. Many dog foods are full of cheap carbohydrate fillers when they need a high protein diet.
    There are mastiff and dogue owners here so best wishes for your new pup, we like photos when you can.
    I am sure others on the forum will give you some advice.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by moorey16 View Post
    Hi All,
    I am new at this so please bare with me and my questions.
    My partner and i are getting a Bull Mastiff cross Dogue De Bordeaux puppy he will be 8 weeks old when we get him and there are a few things i want to know.
    Firstly i keep getting told various things on the feeding thing. I would have thought a dog that can grow to be his expected size should eat 3 times a day? i also would think that atleast one of those meals should include wet food / meat?
    Secondly when do you recommend getting these breeds desexed? i hear they can get aggressive if you leave it too long?
    Any help would be great.

    Thanks
    Jess
    Congratulations on your new puppy. Firstly how much research have you done on these two breeds of dogs?
    i hear they can get aggressive if you leave it too long?
    I find this comment quite alarming??

    The first thing I would be doing is booking into a vet. The puppy should already come with the first vaccination done and a microchip but he will need boosters. You can also discuss food requirements with the vet as well. A good quality biscuit is important if you chose to go down that path, you could also feed RAW. I would avoid tinned foods as they are pretty shitty quality and generally go straight through the dog anyway. I fed both of my dogs 3 times a day while they were still young and now they generally get fed twice daily. You will also be able to go through worming, heartworm and flea/tick treatments.

    I would also look at puppy school. Training is going to be very very important as when this puppy grows up he will be a very strong and big dog. Positive reinforcement is the best way and just be sure to never ever hit your dog (one way to ensure your dog doesn't end up aggressive). You will also need to start socialisation ASAP, with as many different dogs (healthy vaccinated dogs though) and people as possible. It is important to start at this age to ensure the dog doesn't become aggressive.

    For desexing it is really up to you, some people say to leave it until the dog has finished growing as it can affect growth. I waited until both of my dogs were 1 year old before they were, but they aren't large breeds.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #4
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    Also there are a number of threads that will have heaps of information about puppy care around the forum! A couple of members might post them up for you too

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  5. #5
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    Moorey16

    Note the following is my unprofessional opinion - take what you want from it and ignore the rest. It's a bit more "imperative know it all" than I'd like but I don't have time to modify it.

    DDB x Mastiff - have you got the slobber towels ready?

    So is the breeder helping you at all with care of your puppy or are you on your own? Ideally the breeder provides you with a puppy care pack specific to the breed.

    You could try contacting an ANKC DDB breeder or Mastiff breeder and asking them if they have a puppy care pack you could buy - but they're likely to be a little bit peeved that you got a mixed breed puppy. Hmm maybe that's a bad idea.

    Dogs that are going to be huge - do have lots of special requirements that not every vet is going to be familiar with. The most likely to know are the big dog breeders. I know one great dane breeder - not face to face but I've had a few email conversations. She has a puppy supplies website here, you could email her for advice too. She might not like your choice of puppy either, but she will have the best interests of the puppy at heart.
    Whelping Supplies contact us page

    As for general dog training and attitude - you have a mix of two guard dog breeds. Mostly these prefer to be at home with their people, and they don't like strangers or strange dogs. Taking them for a walk can be very exciting if they decide they're guarding you while you're out too. They are also very powerful - so I've seen quite a few people being towed around by their DDB - so you want to get a nice loose lead walk no matter what (practice with exciting distractions like running cats), happening before the dog is bigger than you are.

    These ones are also prone to joint problems - just because they are so big. So you have to take extra care while they are puppies not to allow the dog to do anything that could cause later joint problems. Rule of thumb: 5 minutes walking/play per month of age (and then some sleeping would be good), you can do more than one session of exercise in a day but it needs to be well separated in time. If your dog is still keen to interact - do some trick training.

    First level trick training for a guard dog - for me - would be give and geddit - asking them to trade their stuff for better stuff you have. hopefully the game of trade stuff will be exciting enough they will do it for fun, because most of the time when you take something away from them, you give it straight back and play with them or you give them something even better. My fav guru started out trading chicken necks that her dog had for chicken necks dipped in salmon oil (there's probably some yummy Australian equivalent). Ie food trades with a puppy you have some control over - is much better than trying to get the poison bait out of an adult DDB's mouth when they don't know the game.

    Start young.

    Next thing - no jumping on to things or off things or people. that means lifting puppy in and out of the car - for as long as you're able. And keeping them off the bed and couch, until they are about 18 months old.

    Dogue de Bordeaux - Taureauxroug Dogue de Bordeaux

    has some good info. You especially want to read the stuff about bloat. You want to be really careful not to mix food and exercise as this is a contributing factor. And any time your dog seems like he has a tummy ache - you need to pay close attention. Bloat and gastric torsion (twisted gut) are painful ways to die.

    There are lots of websites for puppy training
    I like kikopup on youtube
    and dog star daily's digital dog text book
    Ch 2: Raising A Puppy | Dog Star Daily

    (you might want to read some of chapter 1 - choosing a puppy - because you do have some catching up to do - based on your question here).

    PS on age to desex
    best to ask a vet or big dog breeder. But I've read 18 months or older is best. And you will have to manage the dog's behaviour with good consistent regular training until then. Never punish your dog for looking at another dog or trying to greet another dog - because your puppy can blame the other dog for that, and decide "I'll get you before you get me" and that will make things worse. Your dog should only greet another dog with your permission - eg always get a sit first, and then give permission (eg "go say hello"), and always have a loose lead - because a tight lead gets interpreted by a dog as no option for "flight" so they might opt for "fight" instead.

    Lots of good experiences for your puppy (called socialisation) helps your puppy learn that most dogs are friendly. Make sure you protect your puppy from rude dogs who barge straight up to your puppy and try to bully. A polite greeting is a slow indirect approach with lots of looking away and sniffing the ground - then sniffing each other (butts and faces). My dog also opts for barge up to within 5m then crawl and roll over at 2m. Crawl and roll over is the ultimate "I'm no threat" greeting. A drop is a good start but some dogs find that hard to do.

    Pay attention to how your puppy is responding to the approach of other dogs and do not force a greeting. If your puppy is showing a lot of stress - looking away, licking lips, trying to get behind you, protect your puppy by standing between the other dog and your puppy. With my dog, I face her so I can watch what she's doing and she lets me know where the other dog is.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 12-20-2013 at 03:14 PM.

  6. #6
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    Some good info in the above posts....

    Just wanted to stress the slobber towels, no jumping and not to much exercise while young, and the dreaded 'Bloat'.

    I feed my Mastiffs at night time only now so they sleep with full bellys. The bowel can twist if they have a full belly and then play hard. It's a real concern.... please google it and read up.

    Other than that your going to have a pretty cool dog so please share some pictures with us. Good luck with your new slobber monster !!


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
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  7. #7
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    Listen and learn about bloat. Only last week an acquaintance lost their dog to it. They found out what it was when they got the vet with a dying dog, too late.

  8. #8
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    Welcome to the forum, and CONGRATULATIONS on your new pup!
    You've found a lovely mix lady. Your gonna be so impressed with this pup.
    They are not aggressive! neither mastiff's or bordeauxs. so ignore that bit of fact you've been given.

    They are BOTH slobber heads. so yeah, slobber towels, think you'll need 12 to keep up with it. the slobbering tends to start a little later around the 4 - 6 month mark, and as the amount of mouth leakage depends on the lips, you wont know if you have a good one, or not so good one, till its too late and you are in love!

    They are plodders. they sleep masses. they are energetic, briefly, then fall into a coma, with their head on your foot afterward.
    my bordeaux is my shadow. I rescued him at 1yr, and we've just had him desexed at 18 months. Never been aggressive. Nor have other mastiff's i know.

    However, we have friends that breed mastiff's, and the male would rip any other dog apart. Like families, with lots of kids. One is likely to be more aggro than others.
    send photos please!

  9. #9
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    Another Mastiff cross owner here and nothing to add to the great advice you've already been given. Other than with training be patient patient patient. They can be challenging to train, and my boy, although I've now decided he's smart, can play dumb, and have the attention span of a gnat when it suits him. And from what I've seen/heard about other Mastiffs, like mine, they don't particularly like to drop. I've made sure he knows it, and will do it, but he carries on like a pork chop when he does it. Makes a game of it, but that's ok, his sit is impeccable .

    I will be getting him desexed around 18 months. I feed prescription kibble due to food allergies.

    And yes, photos please. I have a low-slobber model, but still have a towel handy as when it happens it usually ends up wrapped around my leg. Yay.

    Congrats, hope you love him as much as all of us mastiff-lovers adore ours.

  10. #10
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