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Thread: Calming Signals

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    Calming signals are individual, and a 'snap shot' often misses what other signals go with the photographed head, like tail carriage, body stance, muscle stiffness, movement etc. Calming signals, are body language, that is offered not just when in stress, but all the time. Licking your lips in this house, means yum, food. The anxious lip lick is very rapid, fleeting, and only the tip is used. the lip lick in the pic, is rather large for my dogs distressed lip lick.

    You also need to know the context the dog is in, when giving you them. Then the whole picture can be added up to a pretty good accurate guess.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Bunbury
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    That is true Bernie I guess my hope is the post inspires people to be more observant.
    Individual dogs will have variations, but at least if people look they may become ( I include myself) more skilled at reading.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    I got switched onto calming signals with a rather reactive rottie i had. they work, really really work! Look at that in particular.
    and you can start giving them back, to guide a dog through challenges, like women with scarfs, shiny floors, and other terminal threats he perceived.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    most dog bites requiring hospital treatment are by the family dog. And the parents always seem so surprised. Like the story where the rotty got put to sleep for biting the family child but the parents were so surprised they insisted on an autopsy.

    Which found a pencil rammed in the dog's ear. Children are savage beasts and not to be trusted.

    And the number of dogs I see get punished for showing anxiety or even friendliness. The behaviour is not managed or prevented, there is no alternate (incompatible) behaviour trained - the dog gets punished.

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