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Thread: Our foster pup went to his forever home

  1. #1
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    Default Our foster pup went to his forever home

    Last night. Both I and my daughter got a bit emotional after he'd gone. Our first foster, who nearly died a week after we got him and who was utterly adorable.

    But I watched them drive off with him in the back of the station wagon, ferociously wagging his tail. His new owners will love him to bits and give him everything he needs (and some), I reckon. But of course I worry. How will he go without another dog to keep him company? With being locked outside during the day? Will they know how to train him?

    I could have done more training with him than I did. But I toilet trained him, which I think was a nice gift to the new owners. And I started laying the foundations for training by tossing him the occasional treat for lying down calmly when I was busy, or in the back of the car and for walking on a loose lead, for checking on me when off leash, etc. He could sit and lie down for treats too, but I didn't make much of an effort to proof that because I could only do it if I locked Banjo out because she'd just get cranky when I gave him treats for such easy stuff!

    We only cared for him for a month. Enough to get quite attached to him though. I did enjoy the peace and quiet at home last night. Our cat seemed ecstatic about him being gone. Banjo seemed a bit more settled too, though she will probably miss him when I'm out. And it was nice to just take Banjo out last night and this morning. "Just me and my dog". I do like having an only dog. We're going camping at the coast this weekend. And even though we're a bit disappointed that we couldn't take pup on his first ever beach trip, it will be so much more relaxing when I don't have to chase after him all the time.

    But in 2 weeks time there's a pet expo at the RSPCA and if they don't get adopted, the rescue org will give us one of our first foster pup's sisters to take home. In hindsight it was a good experience and I look forward to a long list of dogs that we will help to find a good home. And kittens again too when the season starts.

  2. #2

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    Great job Beloz! Fostering is very rewarding, yes a little bittersweet. But a really positive thing for kids to be a part of too.

    Foster kitties are great fun! No doubt you'll have some more tiny furries running about very soon.

  3. #3
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    It is great for kids. We actually started fostering kittens to give me an excuse to get rid of our frigging pet mice that my daughter never looked after. I remember at about 6, she looked after our first foster kittens almost independently. And she has continued to do her bit since. But one of the best effects is the message that our own feelings aren't always what matters most. I have found her huddled on the floor bawling her eyes out after a foster cat left. Yet, she wants to do it again and again because she realises why we do it. When I explained to her recently what a blow the vet costs for the parvo pups were to the rescue org, she came up with the idea to do some busking with her keyboard to raise money. She raised $21.10. Lol But I was very proud of her for caring enough and for putting her money where her mouth is so to speak.

    And I am in my 40s and have never done any volunteer work. I think it's time I started giving something back to society, apart from paying taxes, if you know what I mean. And this is something I find fairly easy to do.

    And if anyone reading this thinks that they wish they could help rescues but can't foster (or donate money), we had a local volunteer take care of all the paperwork, the yard check, organising payment to the vet, etc and I found that made things so much easier for me. They also often need people just to organise transport, manage applications, update the website and other administrative tasks. So there are fairly easy ways to get involved that don't involve taking in pets yourself but make a real difference. Everything works so much smoother if there's a team to rely on for support.

  4. #4
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    What wonderful lessons for a budding adult to experience. Nice parenting Beloz! of fur/non furries.

    But that would be me bawling my eyes out on the floor on depature. I tend to keep my fosters, oops! But havent fostered for about 6yrs now, as i ran out of kennel space.

  5. #5
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    That's why I don't get too tempted, Bernie. I have a strict limit to how many animals I can cope with in my house. At the moment it is 2 dogs and 2 cats or 1 adult cat and 2 kittens. Once that quota has been filled, we can't do any more fostering. I know ex-foster carers who end up with 5 adopted dogs and 5 cats eventually. Which is fine, but I have sworn that won't be me. Yet anyway! Our cat was a foster failure but she filled a hole that needed filling and I always intended to adopt one. One dog, one cat, and a few temporary visitors, that's it.

  6. #6
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    Most of the pups that were at the local RSPCA pet expo got adopted on the weekend, so I went home without foster dog. Now I just heard that a rescue organisation in the region is handing over all their dogs to ours. They're mostly small dogs and some are just utterly adorable. And I know they'll be adopted within weeks if not days in Canberra. So now I'm tempted to tell them to send 2 over at a time! The beginning of the end?

  7. #7
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    LMAO @ 'send 2 over at a time'
    whilst 'you always swore no 5 dog spinster act.....' you werent on your OWN land then, and had others set boundaries for ya. Careful love, careful....

    sad @ 'all their dogs'

  8. #8
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    There's about 10 dogs. There is one woman running the rescue and she needs a break.

    I am still not keeping any, Bernie! I'll have to talk to my daughter and decide if we could cope with 2 extra dogs for a little while. And of course, I'm not sure how Banjo would react. Or the cat...

  9. #9
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    Well, the woman found a helper and is now not handing over the dogs. Which I suppose is good news. Only, these dogs were already vaccinated. Now I have to read all the requests to save dogs from death row at local pounds and we can't take in any of them because our yard is contaminated with parvo and the vaccination status of these pound dogs is unknown. Which means it would take 6 weeks after their first vaccination before it is safe for them to come here.

    So I'm totally useless as a foster carer now, for the next 6 or so months. It's really frustrating.. .

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