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Thread: Snake Prevention

  1. #1

    Default Snake Prevention

    For starters

    Some general tips for snake prevention:

    Keep all grasses low.

    Keep gardens simple and avoid close root, ground hugging plants like agapanthus and ivy (these make great protection for snakes from natural predators as they can camouflage very well in the tight leaf and root structure, they also provide hiding places for snake's food items such as frogs and skinks)

    Keep wood piles away from the house and elevate off the ground where possible, wood piles kept in secured sheds are most ideal, i.e.; garden sheds without any holes and a concrete floor.

    Reduce rubbish in the back yard, if it is necessary to have sheets of corrugated iron and colourbond in your yard, separate with bricks and elevate off the ground, alternatively don't lay flat on the ground.

    When building rock walls, stop up any gaps with mortar, any hole could be a potential snake hide.

    Stop up any gaps in fence lines with snake and mouse mesh (5mm gauge mesh available from leading hardware stores), dug in at least 5cm. Alternatively build a colourbond fence and have it dug in at least 5cm, with no gaps along the edge.

    Keep composts in bins, without any gaps for rodents to get into.
    Last edited by Snake Catcher; 09-26-2013 at 06:25 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
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    5,967

    Default

    Snake netting and a shot gun are also good as well as the above advice.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3

    Default

    Probably not a good idea to promote illegal activity on a forum where moderators could come under fire.
    A stupid thing to say Dee,
    I was waiting for these comments though as it is a fairly typical attitude of the scared and ignorant

    Di_dee1 said

    Snake netting and a shot gun are also good as well as the above advice.
    Last edited by Snake Catcher; 09-27-2013 at 06:41 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
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    388

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    Some good tips there snake-catcher, thanks. It's that time of year again and the snakes are on the move - unfortunately we seem to have an awful lot more dead on the road than usual. We've always had a live and let live attitude in my family, and although we see heaps of snakes each year we've never had a problem as we keep our property pretty clear of rubbish, and as you said, they really would rather get away from us (except the occasional diamond python that seems hell-bent on coming inside).

    It's the death-adders freak me out. They are just so bloody hard to see until you're nearly on top of them. Any extra little pearls of wisdom on staying safe from them?

  5. #5

    Default

    Death adders are ambush hunters, striking from under the cover of leaves and can usually be found under trees in the leaf litter.

    If you want, you can carry a plastic rake or even a branch from a tree you can check under the suspect leaf litter by gently raking it away and if you find a snake, you can observe it, call a snake catcher, or just leave it alone

    They wont bite unless they are actually stepped on so you are able to walk very close to one and not be bitten.

    They don't want to attract the attention of a potential predator by striking out and will remain under cover until the danger (you) pass.

    Knowing the habits of each particular species, death adders, brown snakes, blacks, tigers and copperheads will go a long to helping you to avoid a bite

    Ignorance, fear and attempts to kill snakes have led to many deaths over the years

    If you do get bitten by death adder and promptly apply a compression bandage and ring an ambulance,
    you will survive.
    Last edited by Snake Catcher; 09-27-2013 at 06:10 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
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    Thanks, I didn't know that a death adder wouldn't bite unless actually stepped on, so that's good to know.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
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    I always wondered what do you do with the snakes when you got them? If I ever had to call a snake catcher in the past I would have probably been reluctant, thinking Snake catchers probably kill them. From your posts I gather this may not be the case. Correct? Or is this just you?

    Do you have any tips on Brown Snakes. We get a lot of them here and people often freak me out with stories of massive Brown Snakes actually chasing them because they're so territorial. And I've heard that they are responsible for the most deadly snakebites. Any truth in this?

  8. #8

    Default

    My home is actually a wildlife shelter and I care for other animals as well as snakes.

    Id never kill a snake unless it needed to be euthanized and I am the only one here who is legally allowed to kill them to.

    Like all Australian native animals they are protected by law and you need a special permit and licence to kill them.

    Not all snake catchers are environmentalists and some may not care about the welfare of the animals, but personally, I do.

    The Eastern brown snake is the most dangerous snake in Australia.

    The reason is their food source. they are very partial to rodents and will follow their scent trails for miles.

    Humans and rodents go hand in hand as they thrive on what we leave lying around, seeds, grains and other pet foods bring in the rats and mice and Mr Brown follows his nose and unfortunately finds himself confronted by a large animal with a huge fear.

    They sometimes lunge when confronted to make you go away and the brown is known for his double s strike stance which is very intimidating. they like to make themselves look huge to bluff.

    If given an avenue of escape, they will always take and every day I hear of someone being chased by a snake but in all my years I've never heard of anyone being actually caught by one.

    Here is a few pic of Eastern browns I have caught and relocated






  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Rural Western Australia
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    I have a lot of brown snakes -gwadars sp? mainly. I live on a farm and although I really try and keep mice down it is not always that easy as there is always grain around. I have put snake mesh up around my yard but becasue of the sheet rock nature of some of the terrain it is not possible often to dig the mesh in so I have left it flush with the ground is this a problem?.

    I try and keep around the house area clear but obviously I have lots of long grass and rocky outcrops in tha paddocks so sakes are inevitable.
    I have noticed that the sakes generally try and get out of my way and will only threaten when confronted. I remeber one of my dogs confronting one and this snakle reared up high over his head fortunately I called him off beofre any biting. I have had one run between the legs of a dog and me in its efforts to get away.

    My question is when do they become active. At the moments the nights are very cold but the sun is up and starting to warm things during the day. I walk the dogs early when it is still cold and in the evening when it starting to cool down. Not sure if it is safe during these times. I take it that on warm summer nights they would be nocturnal.

    Do they seek out water? just wondering about water bowls.

    I definitely avoid killing them but I live a very long way from any snake catcher so if it is an immediate threat in yard or house I would take the neccesary action.

    My neighbour was bitten when she stepped on one in the yard and she had to be airlifted out by RFDS and very nearly died.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-27-2013 at 10:26 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
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    Shade cloth is also good but expensive to use. Snakes don't get caught in it.
    The bulk of my dog yard has shade cloth up to about 4ft high. It and the mesh when used was anchored by a few tractor buckets of dirt and shoveled onto the lower L part of the placement of the cloth or netting.
    Our area is flat though, thank goodness.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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