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Thread: Snake Prevention

  1. #21

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    Well the quickest and most humane way to kill any animal is massive brain trauma.

    A lot easier said than done unfortunately as it requires the animal to be still while

    you confidently and quickly cave its head in with a blunt instrument.

    Reptiles are different to mammals and birds in their structure and do not die when decapitated.

    If you find a road victim, it is best to take it to a vet or animal carer for assessment.

    As wildlife rescue volunteers, a lot of us are trained how to euthanize with a rifle,

    and the rifle is actually part of our kit as unfortunately, wildlife rescue, more often than not, means euthanizing the
    animal

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Catcher View Post
    Well the quickest and most humane way to kill any animal is massive brain trauma.

    A lot easier said than done unfortunately as it requires the animal to be still while

    you confidently and quickly cave its head in with a blunt instrument.

    Reptiles are different to mammals and birds in their structure and do not die when decapitated.

    If you find a road victim, it is best to take it to a vet or animal carer for assessment.

    As wildlife rescue volunteers, a lot of us are trained how to euthanize with a rifle,

    and the rifle is actually part of our kit as unfortunately, wildlife rescue, more often than not, means euthanizing the
    animal
    I had to cut a large male roo out of a fence on a fence run and the only safe way to deal with it as its leg was clearly beyond help was to shoot it, it was afraid and very aggressive and was out to inflict damage on anyone that came too close despite being crippled, so you need to make sure you dont put yourself in danger when dealing with large injured wildlife. I have picked up an echidna though from in front of a large road train bearing down on it. That was prickly customer and again you need to be mindful of your own safety.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-28-2013 at 03:50 PM.

  3. #23
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    Is it true that snakes are the most aggressive in spring? And then somewhat mellow down during summer? I also was told it's safe to go out with the dogs once temperatures hit the 30sbecause then snakes aren't out anymore either. No intentions of taking the dogs for a walk in the midday heat. But I like taking them for a swim to a dam in the forest.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    Is it true that snakes are the most aggressive in spring? And then somewhat mellow down during summer? I also was told it's safe to go out with the dogs once temperatures hit the 30sbecause then snakes aren't out anymore either. No intentions of taking the dogs for a walk in the midday heat. But I like taking them for a swim to a dam in the forest.
    I have seen large western browns out and about in the mid day heat. Actually I think this one was probably lying in the cool of a shed when my footsteps disturbed it. It looked at me and we were both still, it finally moved off at a lick into the midday sun. I have also had a large snake snatched from right in front of me by an eagle when I was out in the heat. In the late afternoon it is often still around 40 degrees in summer and I see them then in the wheat stubble.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-28-2013 at 03:59 PM.

  5. #25
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    So do I.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #26
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    Really? See, there you go. I was told that they can't be out when it's above 30ish because they can't handle the heat and would 'boil' in their own skin.

  7. #27
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    I doubt they would be deliberately basking in the sun but hey out here sometimes it doesnt fall below 30 for days and weeks even at night and I see them or see their trails.

  8. #28
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    I read a news story a while back where someone got prosecuted for "cruelty to animals" for trying to kill a roo(?) that had been hit by a car - by pounding on its head with a rock.

    I really don't know what to do with things that get hit on the road and don't die and can't hop away. I would not be able to wield a rock or anything else successfully to pound the critter's head in.

    I know that snakes that get run over - end up dying but they can be hard to avoid too.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I read a news story a while back where someone got prosecuted for "cruelty to animals" for trying to kill a roo(?) that had been hit by a car - by pounding on its head with a rock.

    I really don't know what to do with things that get hit on the road and don't die and can't hop away. I would not be able to wield a rock or anything else successfully to pound the critter's head in.

    I know that snakes that get run over - end up dying but they can be hard to avoid too.
    I've come across a few of these situations and my decision was to line their heads up with my car tyre and run my car over their head. Sounds nasty but at the end of the day they were either going to die a slow painfull death or someone was going to find a way to put them out of their misery. I did also make sure I had done the job properly by both running over their heads a few times before getting out to check that they were in fact dead.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I've come across a few of these situations and my decision was to line their heads up with my car tyre and run my car over their head. Sounds nasty but at the end of the day they were either going to die a slow painfull death or someone was going to find a way to put them out of their misery. I did also make sure I had done the job properly by both running over their heads a few times before getting out to check that they were in fact dead.
    Most recent situation, I happened to have my little brother with me when taking Jack for a run, we got back to the car to find a seagull that couldn't move, certainly couldn't fly. I got my brother to help make sure my tyre ran directly over the birds head. After going forward, reversing and going forward again we were both satisfied that the bird was dispatched. The alternative of course was to leave it there to die from whatever other means nature dished out

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