Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 73

Thread: If I were to get a Great Dane...

  1. #51
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    We used to rent in a very dodgy area, we wanted a dog really badly but there are hardly any rentals up here that allow pets so we knew it wasn't a good idea, we eventually bought our own house and then adopted our dogs. Now we're in the process of buying an investment property and were trying to decide what house to live in and what house to rent.. we decided we will rent the one we're currently in, because it is already 'dog proof' (no nice gardens, no irrigation pipes left etc) so we can allow pets and any dogs living here won't cause too much damage, plus we can charge more rent than what our repayments are as rentals allowing dogs are as rare as hens teeth..

    I understand wanting a puppy, but I got both my dogs as adults who had never been around cats before and they get on fantastic with our cat. MollyTonks.jpg.
    You could always look at rescue puppies rather than supporting a BYB? A lot of the time the mum gets surrendered with the litter so you can meet her too. I love rescuing dogs, its a wonderful feeling watching them come out of their shells and turning into wonderful dogs. When we got Molly, we couldn't even approach or touch her for 2 weeks, she was THAT terrified, now she's happy and settled. We've definitely had our issues.. 1 destroyed bed, 2 destroyed couches, destroyed garden, destroyed outdoor furniture etc but I think any dog will do that sort of stuff. Our dogs aren't particularly large (lab cross 22kg, spaniel cross 13kg) but they scared off an intruder a few months ago.. I think a lot of it is about the noise they can make, as long as they are able to alert the humans, most people will stay away...
    Last edited by Kristy.Maree; 09-24-2013 at 09:11 AM.

  2. #52

    Default

    An update for you all:
    So I think the saying 'good things come to those who wait' might finally be in my favour... some Bull Arab x Bull Mastiff pups will be 6 weeks on the 2nd November This is perfect for me. That's about a month after I move into my new place. There's 5 fawn pups (3 already taken ) a few grey, a few black, and one brindle.. Yet again, I'm leaning towards the brindle... not normally the colour I go for in a pup... But my gut instinct is telling me it's the way to go. Otherwise, my other picks (all males) are an all black one, and a dark fawn.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wkristen View Post
    some Bull Arab x Bull Mastiff pups will be 6 weeks on the 2nd November
    So you will be picking your pup up on the 16th November? Puppies really shouldn't leave the litter until they are at least 8 weeks old

  4. #54

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy.Maree View Post
    So you will be picking your pup up on the 16th November? Puppies really shouldn't leave the litter until they are at least 8 weeks old
    I hope too! It depends if the breeder will be fine with holding him two more weeks. They've advertised them as ready at 6 weeks. Fingers crossed!

  5. #55
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    I would avoid buying a puppy from anybody who is willing to give them away at 6 weeks.. there is no real point them holding onto him until 8 weeks if all his litter mates are gone at 6 weeks. During 6-8 weeks of age puppies learn a lot of valuable socialisation skills from their siblings, and considering you are looking at a large breed dog, it is very important (basically essential) for it to learn these 'manners' off its siblings so you don't have any behavioural problems down the track. It is also illegal to sell puppies unless they are microchipped.

    I know you are really excited about getting a puppy, and I know the "I want one ASAP" feeling and how hard it is to wait, but it is really important that you take your time finding the perfect dog, from an ethical breeder. I doubt these puppies parents have been hip or elbow scored? With such a large dog, if the parents haven't been cleared, you are more than likely looking at dysplasia as the dog gets older, which costs thousands of dollars and possibly even the animal PTS... is that really worth getting a puppy a few weeks/months earlier? You must remember that you will have this dog for 10-18 years, so you must also plan ahead, not just look at the 'cute puppy' stage.
    Ultimately it's your decision, but I really wouldn't be supporting a BYB. If you want to, have a read of this What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    Last edited by Kristy.Maree; 09-26-2013 at 11:09 AM.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    Also, I sort of missed the thread when you were deciding on a breed, but what are your thoughts of cattle dogs? They are excellent dogs, not as many 'problems' as all those larger breeds, but they are so loyal, tough and 'hardy' and definitely scare people away.. most people I speak to would much rather enter a yard with a Rottweiler in it than a cattle dog My old housemate had one and she was so loving and friendly to people she knew and to people who we showed her were 'okay', but if a stranger came over, she became the devil!

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    If you're getting these from a breeder, I really would at the very least choose one that somewhat cares about the pups' wellbeing. If they want to get rid of them at 6 weeks, they probably won't pay much attention to early socialisation, etc.

    I really don't have a good feeling about any of this.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    tasmania
    Posts
    266

    Default

    I agree with what the others have said about getting a pup from any one who's willing to let them go at 6 weeks.
    Also beware that you may end up with a really big dog.
    My 15 month old puppy is a bullmastiff cross bull arab and when he was weighed 3 months ago he was 70 kilos so he's probably bigger now. Can you really afford the costs associated with a puppy that may grow this big?
    If you think dogs can't count, try putting three dog biscuits in your pocket and then giving Fido only two of them. ~Phil Pastoret

  9. #59

    Default

    After all that, the father of the pups has changed my mind... I was going to view the parents and pups today, but after seeing pictures from one Facebook page to another in regards to these dogs, turns out the father is partly or mostly Bandogge. I showed the photo of him to my partner's father who's been around a lot of dogs in his time and he thinks there's definitely Pitbull in there somewhere... I don't normally like to judge a dog by its breed - it's the owner that raises it, not the dog - but a dog whose history is dog aggressive - nah ah, no thank you. Been there, done that. Don't want to risk it again. The timing has just been shot too.. I just checked my roster for the next few weeks and my shifts have been cut back Wouldn't be able to afford the $300 price tag they wanted anyway...
    - PLEASE let the right dog be there when I'm ready to pick one!!

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Oh FFS. I'm really getting annoyed about this. How on earth do you expect to be able to care for a giant breed dog when you can't even pay for the adoption fee?

    None of the advice that has been given to you here by experienced dog owners seems to have gotten through at all.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •