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Thread: If I were to get a Great Dane...

  1. #41
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    Aug 2011
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    LOL..Grevillea...that evil little old lady might have wanted my phone for her drug runs or to pawn my ipod....Mojo put a stop to that !!


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  2. #42

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    Really like this Great Dane in our park
    Gentle giants

    Hope you get it from a breeder
    m<(o.o)>m

  3. #43

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    Haha that is true grevillea47, but I do love my big dogs.
    Sean, it does prove a point about the size of dogs, but some people who mean no harm can take the size of a dog the complete wrong way and decide for themselves that it's dangerous... grevillea47 makes a good point though, the people that are determined to intrude will do so anyway, regardless of whether there's a big dog there or not... I guess for me it's a security blanket, to have my big softy by my side...


    On the other hand! (Sorry to confuse you all once again) My gut feels like a Staffy would be the best option for me? Maybe because the owners of my new home have a Staffy, maybe because I did enjoy having a Staffy, maybe because they're manageable to pick up... I don't know.. But when I think of a Staffy as an option, it feels right... They can be diggers, they can be picky with their doggy friends and they do LOVE people... I really don't know what to do anymore!

  4. #44
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    I think you should maybe wait 6 months and see where you stand and then re-evaluate the decision to get a puppy. To me you don't sound ready, you don't even know what you want.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    I think you should maybe wait 6 months and see where you stand and then re-evaluate the decision to get a puppy. To me you don't sound ready, you don't even know what you want.
    Yeah this is true... I'm still looking at rescue dogs too though.. Although I wouldn't go down that path again unless the person/rescue I got the dog from TRULY knew what that dog was like and had spent a decent amount of time with it. There are just so many different breeds out there.. I guess I shouldn't generalise though.. A mixed breed can have so many different traits on top of having it's own unique personality... I guess like others have said, the right dog/puppy will turn up when I'm ready.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkristen View Post
    Yeah this is true... I'm still looking at rescue dogs too though.. Although I wouldn't go down that path again unless the person/rescue I got the dog from TRULY knew what that dog was like and had spent a decent amount of time with it. There are just so many different breeds out there.. I guess I shouldn't generalise though.. A mixed breed can have so many different traits on top of having it's own unique personality... I guess like others have said, the right dog/puppy will turn up when I'm ready.
    I think you probably have a better chance of finding a suitable adult rescue dog than a puppy from a 'breeder'.. at least you have a rough idea of what the adult dog's personality will be like.. saying "Although I wouldn't go down that path again unless the person/rescue I got the dog from TRULY knew what that dog was like and had spent a decent amount of time with it" just doesn't make much sense to me.. I would think that a puppy would be way more risky..

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy.Maree View Post
    I think you probably have a better chance of finding a suitable adult rescue dog than a puppy from a 'breeder'.. at least you have a rough idea of what the adult dog's personality will be like.. saying "Although I wouldn't go down that path again unless the person/rescue I got the dog from TRULY knew what that dog was like and had spent a decent amount of time with it" just doesn't make much sense to me.. I would think that a puppy would be way more risky..
    I haven't had much luck with older dogs, and one was a rescue dog. They told me what he'd be like, but he wasn't like that at all. He was a mess. The poor soul was a little misunderstood... I want to train, socialise and raise a pup around my cat. I feel there's more uncertanties with getting a dog from a rescue centre. I believed the same, that a rescue dog was a better option because all the raising and training had already been done and the rescue shelter would know what the dog was like and whether it was suitable for you... That's what they also said to me, but he wasn't; not for the circumstances, not for the temperament, not at all. I want to start from scratch - See and meet the parents, spend time with them and understand their temperaments, view each and every puppy in the litter etc. I've also learnt temperament tests, like rolling a puppy on it's back and seeing how it reacts, holding it under its belly off the ground and monitor for the same reactions... I love all that stuff, and am really looking forward to training

  8. #48
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    On the subject of deterring intruders - I live in a high crime area and would not be without my dogs. My bully cross is getting old, and this is the reason I chose a larger breed to help her and be taught by her. Neither of my dogs is guard trained, both extremely friendly, although the big fella is a little wary of strangers at first. They both have natural instincts to protect their property, and there is absolutely no doubt in my mind that the big dogs in the area are the biggest deterrents to intruders - merely by their presence.

    Just a side note - A few years ago the local police here attended an incident and happened to actually interrupt the intruder. He got away by jumping from yard to yard over back and side fences but dropped something as he went. The police picked up the piece of paper he had dropped to find a mud-map of our area, houses sketched in, each one that had a dog clearly marked out on the map and avoided in the getaway. (the cop showed me the map, btw)

    And that was any dog, not just large dogs. Can't tell me dogs don't deter intruders, I have years of observing the exact opposite. A determined intruder may well get in, but as a rule I believe they'll go to an easier mark (a house without a big scary dog or a little yappy alarm) if they can.

    Just my 2 cents worth. And I do not believe it's necessary to have a guard trained dog. I believe that most dogs will protect what's theirs by instinct if they feel threatened.

  9. #49
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    I know what you meant by guard dog and I still don't think that is a good reason to pick the type of dog you want to get. Getting a dog that intimidates other people and dogs adds a whole layer of complexity, especially for an inexperienced owner.

    Do you feel capable of preventing a dog like that from feeding off being met with fear or intimidation and exploiting it? Prevent him from chasing dogs that try to run away from him? Teach him to stay away from people who panic when he walks up to say hello and dogs that cower? To not jump up at anyone, ever? Believe me, that last one is much, much harder than it sounds.

    These are all things that can be trained for, but if you make some mistakes initially while you learn how to tackle them, you may find yourself way more unpopular in your neighbourhood or at the dog walking spot with a big dog than you would with something smaller.

    It was the reason why I got a rescue dog that was smaller than my first dog.

    Also, no one ever claimed that rescue dogs come already trained. They usually end up in rescue because their previous owners did not train them and then decided that they were too hard to live with. But an adult dog can be trained in the same way you train a pup. The only thing that is harder is if they haven't been socialised as pup. That is something that you want to find out about them. And it is easier to get a good picture of their temperament when they live with a carer in their home.

  10. #50

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    Yes, that last point you made Beloz pretty much described my rescue dog. He came to the rescue place as a small pup and grew up there, I don't think anyone had ever taken him home and seen what he would've been like. Everything they told me was an assumption. They did say that everything would be new to him and I accepted that and was prepared to take him to different places, but I don't think they realised that he was very under socialised, particularly with men. They'd never seen what he'd have been like in someone's yard apart from the one he ran around in with the rescue's other dogs. He lived most of his life in a cage with his sister and any other dog they put in there, was let out for a walk by one of their walkers, and then let into their yard, and then back in the cage again. I don't think many people had spent some genuine time with him... I have met other rescue dogs that are with foster families and they definitely have a better judgement of character than the ones at the centre.

    I have my eye on a few from North Qld Animal Rescue. But I won't be making any decisions for at least another 4 weeks.

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