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Thread: If I were to get a Great Dane...

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    'wkristen' - no - not sad news ! Leaves you time to make sure your accommodation is what you really want - and still leaves you time to find a pup !

    The breeder was obviously - pushing your buttons !

    Don't ummm and arrrr - look at an agreement with your prospective landlords - that is the only way that you can be sure that you will protected.
    Yeah I guess... I was just so hopeful I could make it work, but the time frame was a lot shorter than what the breeder originally made out.

    I don't really have anywhere else to go for that sort of rent/week that'll take animals, so I'm hoping for dear life that it'll all turn out so much better than the last year has here in this unit. It's treated me well, but I'm not giving up on getting a puppy! Or otherwise, hope for dear life that I get a super awesome paying job that I can get me a loan for a house

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
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    I agree with Riley - try to look at this as a sign it wasn't meant to happen just yet. Nothing could be worse than bringing him home only to find yourself in a similar situation to before and having to rehome the pup only weeks or months after you get him. Patience will reward you with the perfect pup for you and your situation, when the time is right. Disappointing I know, but try to see it as a positive if you can.

  3. #33

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    It would be hypocritical for me to tell you not to buy a large breed puppy whilst renting and more importantly, whilst not having a stable rental setup because I did exactly the same thing. Now almost 4 years later, my large breed puppy has grown into a large dog and despite him never having caused any issues, and the fact that I've always gotten 100% of my bond back, renting is still a nightmare for me. There's just a few things I would say, because I wish someone had explained them to me.

    Firstly, renting with any pets is hard, especially in cities but as the owner of a large breed of dog, you will be preferenced below every other pet owner. When you do find a rental that accepts pets, typically, they mean they'd look at a cat, or a small dog at a stretch. A lot of people assume that a large dog will need a large backyard and although I now know it's not true (even if your dog is an active breed), you will never convince anyone of this. So your options are slim. I live in the worst house by far of any of my peers and colleagues, but I don't pay less and that brings me to point number 2.

    People will charge you more for being the owner of a large breed. There is an unofficial tax on large breed dog ownership. When people own a property that isn't really all that nice but they still want to charge a motza for it, they will make it pet friendly. Of course it's illegal to charge people a pet bond or anything like that, but that doesn't mean they can't set their rental price $100's higher than any other house in the neighbourhood and rest assured that some desperate pet owner will have to pay it. If you're worried about the food and vet bills, you should be, all of that will cost you $1000's but it's nothing compared to how much extra you will be forking out for rent and travel (because you will likely need to commute further than you would without a dog). Owning a large breed of dog in this day and age is a very expensive luxury.

    The third point, and this is most important point, big dogs are hard to re-home. Despite my circumstances and unstable living situation, I only took on Sammy because if I absolutely had to, I could buy a house. It would not be a financially astute move, and so I haven't, but if push came to shove, I would to keep Sammy. Not everyone has that option, and until you do one thing you need to be aware of is that, if you don't have an agreement in writing, your landlord can give you as little as 2 weeks notice to lose the dog or move, especially if there's already a no pets clause in place. Even if you do have an agreement, the tenant could decide he doesn't like your dog, doesn't like the way the house smells of dog. I mean letting someone move in with their house-trained older dog with references is one thing, a new puppy is another altogether. There's a lot of pets ending up in shelters at the moment because people don't have a choice. If you own a small fluffy dog, there's at least a chance it will find a new home if you did have to give it up. But a bull arab? Or anything that looks like a bull arab? Have you seen how many there are in rescue already? The chances are much lower. So you need to understand that if you take this dog on and once it's an adult your circumstances change and you have to surrender the animal, there's a good chance it will be put to sleep. Statistically there's a higher return rate on bull arabs, staffies and large dogs overall. So even if your dog finds a new home initially, they didn't love it from a puppy and they might not be as forgiving of his little idiosyncrasies as you were and if it ends up back at the pound with a bad report, it's pretty much game over.

    Anyway, like I said, it would be hypocritical for me to say don't do it. I did it and I don't regret it. But I do know what it's cost me. I think it's been worth it and more importantly, I have been able to meet the costs, but I know of plenty of people who couldn't and I see what happens to the dogs. I wanted a big dog more than anything and I think that's why it's worked, I don't begrudge the dog for a second for any sacrifices I've had to make, for any damage he does and I feel like my life is better because him. But you have already lost a couple of dogs, you know how circumstances can change and I just think you need to make sure you have really considered everything before you jump
    into this. It's so hard when you're looking at puppies to keep a clear head, most people just can't. It is a deceptively huge commitment and one you could be held to for the next 10-15 years.

    If you do decide that it's the right move for you, I wish you lots of happiness with your new dog. If you don't, well I don't ever say never, I just say not today because it will be better tomorrow.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    wkristen

    I like 99bottle's post.

    Now you have an opportunity to make a dedicated savings effort with the money you would have spent on your puppy to put towards the deposit on a house where you can have one. If you do decide your first house is going to be an apartment or town house - they have things called "body corporates" which are like local councils for your apartment block - so they can have rules (or make rules) that prevent you from keeping a dog. What you'd want is a "torrens title" house with no body corporate.

    Personally I think children and really fat people do more damage to rentals than dogs.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Personally I think children and really fat people do more damage to rentals than dogs.
    <<

    I'm pretty far off getting a deposit for a unit/house... Hence why I'm pretty determined to get a dog now (and train it while I have so much time to put aside to do so)... Probably to the point of obsessed The reason I want a large breed is for guarding purposes. I don't think there'll be a lot of people that'll be fearful of a small dog out here... Apart from Cattle Dogs... There's a few in this area that guard their owner's property with their life. Or maybe a Bull Terrier? (But I'll probably struggle with that breed) ...Any other ideas for guard dogs? I'm also looking for nature in the breed too. I love the nature of Dane's and Mastiff's, but wouldn't get a purebred. The owners are also willing to help with raising the pup. The wife works from home and has suggested that they might need to give it cuddles and/or meals while I'm working, and also to get my pup to spend time with their Staffy so they can hopefully become friends. I do plan on doing an agreement with them, a "Rooming accommodation agreement", so that'll hopefully rule out any inconsistencies

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by wkristen View Post
    << I do plan on doing an agreement with them, a "Rooming accommodation agreement", so that'll hopefully rule out any inconsistencies
    Really pleased to be reading the above !

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkristen View Post
    <<

    I'm pretty far off getting a deposit for a unit/house... Hence why I'm pretty determined to get a dog now (and train it while I have so much time to put aside to do so)... Probably to the point of obsessed The reason I want a large breed is for guarding purposes. I don't think there'll be a lot of people that'll be fearful of a small dog out here... Apart from Cattle Dogs... There's a few in this area that guard their owner's property with their life. Or maybe a Bull Terrier? (But I'll probably struggle with that breed) ...Any other ideas for guard dogs? I'm also looking for nature in the breed too. I love the nature of Dane's and Mastiff's, but wouldn't get a purebred. The owners are also willing to help with raising the pup. The wife works from home and has suggested that they might need to give it cuddles and/or meals while I'm working, and also to get my pup to spend time with their Staffy so they can hopefully become friends. I do plan on doing an agreement with them, a "Rooming accommodation agreement", so that'll hopefully rule out any inconsistencies
    Don't get a dog to guard your place. Get a burglar alarm instead. Or some geese.

    You might end up with a large dog that just wags his tail at the sight of any human and couldn't care less if someone empties your whole house while you're gone anyway.

    Unless you live on a working farm, you should not get a dog to "work" for you. They are companion dogs and the less aggression they show - whether it's for show and "justified" or not - the less likely they and you will get into trouble with neighbours, other dog owners or the council.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Don't get a dog to guard your place. Get a burglar alarm instead. Or some geese.

    You might end up with a large dog that just wags his tail at the sight of any human and couldn't care less if someone empties your whole house while you're gone anyway.

    Unless you live on a working farm, you should not get a dog to "work" for you. They are companion dogs and the less aggression they show - whether it's for show and "justified" or not - the less likely they and you will get into trouble with neighbours, other dog owners or the council.
    I should've clarified better... When I say 'guard dog' I mean a big dog that'll scare off intruders just by his size - oh and a warning bark would be cool! For example, when I was walking my used-to-be Staffy one day, a lady was also walking her Rottweiler... He was MASSIVE! I kept my distance that's for sure! He was scary huge and I didn't want anything nasty happening to my Staffy - WHICH it could be likely that nothing COULD of happened, but the pure sight of him brought that thought into my head.
    Last edited by wkristen; 09-23-2013 at 06:58 PM.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
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    Big dogs do not scare off determined intruders. If that's your need then I'd recommend you do a self defence course and install intruder alarms.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bundaberg QLD
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    LOL...big friendly dogs do scare people....I walked into the vets with Mojo today and a little old lady totally shat herself to the point i felt really bad about it.

    All he wanted was to have a sniff and maybe score a pat...but he didnt even get near her before she retreated and started carrying on. The intimidation factor works as treat when needed but also backfires alot on my friendly goof.


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