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Thread: My dog bit me...

  1. #61
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    Talking

    Frisbees are great, we have one that is made of material that isn't hard on he mouth has a firm rather than hard edge, quite flexible. I think I got it through the K9 online shop. We also have a $5 ball from KMart that she will endlessly play soccer with ( best with us involved of course) Maggie at Gracies age loved killing plastic buckets and brooms, hours of fun. As she has got strong jaws and teeth now the buckets last less than a day so we stopped them, she still throws her brushes around the back yard though.
    It has been raining alot here lately so soccer and frisbee out the back have been the only way we could esxercise her between showers. The unpredictability of the frisbee taxes her brain more than the ball I think.
    Also it is often stated here that any form of obedience/fun training will tire her by taxing their brain.
    As she made it over 12 months she is starting to settle. We did manymany sessions waiting for her to settle/come/ damn well do what she was told...lol
    Keeping a smile and sounding pleased when she finally arrived was very taxing. The beach experience was similar to your dog park, ended up getting there at sunrise to limit the problems.
    Last edited by farrview; 09-25-2013 at 09:35 AM.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    This is the method I try and use but at the entry to the park, with all the action, smells and other dogs sniffing or barking through the fence my strike rate would be less than 5%
    She gets so worked up that I completely lose her. I know giving in perpetuates the problems but It creates such a scene that I'm too embarrassed to stand there for 5 to 10 minutes at the gate waiting for her to calm down

    Speaking of, I won't miss the dog park politics or the DPE (Dog Park Elite), that's for sure!

    Anyway, if that's her worst behaviour then I can deal with that for now!
    A better way of dealing with the over-excited behaviour would probably be to increase the distance between dog and gate to keep her under threshold. Just turn her around and walk away. As soon as she stops acting like a pork chop, you can start walking towards the gate again while you reward her liberally for being calm and sensible. Go slow, if she gets into the zone, go back a bit again. Rinse and repeat. It's not about punishing the dog for getting over-excited. It's about teaching them that choosing to stay calm offers them way more benefits than getting themselves into a state. If she gets worked up about something specific, like the sight of another dog or a ball, adding a cue like Look at That (LAT) can have lots of benefits too. My dog was a tad over-excitable when I got her (that was the kelpie part, I think) and I found LAT an absolute life saver sometimes. She still likes me using it even thought I don't have that many opportunities anymore. For her it just seems like lots of rewards for FA effort but it now always calms her down and visibly reduces her stress levels.

  3. #63
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    Don't you guys just LOVE the Kelpie gene!
    Buckets and brooms sound like a good idea! I think she'll eat the bucket though... she still tries to swallow the most ridiculous things haha

    If I start going to the dog park again I'll definitely try the above Beloz, might stay away for a little while
    I think I'll try that method for when we have visitors, she acts very similar, because everyone is Gracie's best friend and everyone loves Gracie the best (just ask Gracie)

  4. #64
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    Just on the subject of buckets guys, Abe loves his black plastic plant pots. They come in all sizes and you can buy them in bulk pretty cheap. I love watching him walk around the yard blind cos he's picked it up by the bottom rim and found himself with his head in a bucket .

  5. #65
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    Unfortunately LAT never worked for me with visitors! I've seen advice on how to train for calm greetings with a pen or baby gate and the visitors' cooperation. But I eventually resorted to time-out. Which did work, but I found it too hard to be consistent when I had to deal with the visitors at the same time. We don't get that many visitors. Recently I resorted to using a spray bottle if Banjo gets out of control when visitors enter. Probably the most direct positive punishment method I've used for anything with her, but I tried lots of other stuff and this just worked best for me in the end.

  6. #66
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    The way I used LAT was that my reactive dog had a quick look and acknowledged her stressor and then immediately focussed back on me. So as soon as her eyes met mine she got a treat. So it is about the dog acknowledging that there is a strange dog or person at a distance where dog is under threshold and then the dog is able to refocus on you. You practice this always under threshold. It got to the point where I was able to decrease the distance so eventually at the dog park she was able to acknowldege there were other dogs and then focus back on me. I slowly increased the level of stress she was able to deal with.

    I would never have taken her to a busy dog park and let her get totally over the top otherwise you are just reinforcing the behaviour making it more difficult to deal with. I only took her there once she was able to deal with it. It probably took me a year of hard work to get her to that point. For off leash exercise I was living in a situation where I able to take her to a fairly remote area where I could see anything coming for miles. Or I would swim her at the beach throwing her frisbee in the water for her to retrieve. Swimming really tires them out and in the water they cant easily react to things.

  7. #67
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    We were taught the pen/crate method at puppy school (ergh), seems to make the most sense
    I leave a leash on her when people come over and stand on it so she can't jump up but still need to get the cooperation of those visiting and that's not always the easy part

    I'm really looking forward to taking Gracie to the beach this weekend Kalacreek
    We've been twice before, once when she was about 9 weeks and a few weeks ago we had her off leash and she had an absolute party, it was the best!
    I tried to make her swim - she would come out to about knee deep but as soon as she couldn't feel the bottom any more she would get out of there real quick haha
    She seems happy enough biting at the waves

    I've convinced my old man to let me 'teach' her to swim in their pool on Saturday. Obviously swimming is something that comes naturally to them but she's not done it yet
    I assume it's more about teaching her to be comfortable and unafraid of the water (or not being able to touch the ground)?

    I can't believe I'm asking people how to teach a dog to swim

  8. #68
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    Maggie learned to swim chasing the ball into the sea. Found herself suddenly out of her depth and began. She will lie down in the shallows to cool herself when she gets hot (keeps a careful eye out for breaking waves)but I think will not choose to go over her depth for a non ball reason. She did follow me in but then insisted on trying to herd me in which was not very pleasant for me with her sharp claws.
    I think as breeds kelpies and border collies will not choose to swim but can do so perfectly well when they have to.

  9. #69
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    My old dog used to surf a bit if you threw a stick into the waves. Took years of occasional camping trips at the beach to get her to that stage though. And she chose to keep her feet on the sand too, but just stopped freaking out if she was lifted up by a wave.

    Both my dogs learnt to swim by following other dogs into the water, I think. Though it was probably the ducks in the pond that got Banjo over her fear of deep water more than anything. She will still occasionally swim round and round for ages after those ducks. But at least she will come out when I call her now and before I start worrying that she'll drown from pure exhaustion.

  10. #70
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    When Frosty was small - I would go out with her with my arms under her belly and she'd just paddle, supported by me. And I'd do some padding in knee deep water and she'd do a bit too. I'd choose days when the water was really flat, but she's quite confident in waves now, will stand up on her back legs to get over them. But I'm scared she will jump into NSW coastal water and get caught in a rip and I won't be able to help her. There aren't rips on the main Adelaide beaches - though tourists still manage to drown themselves.

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