Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 81

Thread: My dog bit me...

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    She is a working dog breed and so really really wants to please you.

    "what would you like me to do?" is what she is saying to you.

    See my avatar pic, that is my Chubb he was the same as your little girl.

    You have mentioned "not breaking her spirit" - I reckon the way to break
    a dogs spirit is leave it alone in the back yard and ignore it.

    Enjoy your pup she is a sweetie.!

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    I've made her sound like a monster I'm sure
    It all looks much worse and sounds so dramatic written down

    It has been really good to hear people go through the same problems and tell me it gets better rather than just reading whatever I can on Google
    She really is a sweetheart!

    Thank you

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    100% positive reinforcement just seemed to give her an inch so she would take a yard, as they say

    Thanks guys!
    (I'm now addicted to this forum)
    100% Positive reinforcement actually takes a great deal of skill and a clear understanding of the techniques. You have to remember that positive reinforcement techniques in no way means allowing them to get away with things. I have one dog that I am almost 100% positive but I had to work hard to lay the foundations first so that he understood. Many people have absolutely no idea what this method entails and hence end up with badly behaved dogs. I like to use a mix depending on the dog, but when I train agility I use 100% positive reinforcement techniques because I find its what brings out their best performance. However if a dog gets nippy or resource guards I have no compunction on using a sharp voice or rarely a smart tap. I cut them off before they even get a chance to reinforce bad behaviour.

    I will however adjust how I react depending on the dog and what the dogs disposition and background is. A dogs spirit needs to be guided and boundaries set. My dogs seem happy with this arangement and are all high drive and eager to work. Some are more sensitive than others and again I adjust to suit the dog. My training is mainly using positive reinforcement, but my dogs understand the deal.

    At the dog park when your dog was warning off the old dog, personally I dont tolerate that from any of my dogs. If you know your dog will do that and doesnt like being crowded or sharing, which some dogs dont, I would ask the other owner to back the dog off before your dog had a chance to react. It depends on the dog. But I would do whatever resulted in the dog not getting the chance to reinforce that type of behaviour and getting the idea that it can chase and run at other dogs.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-17-2013 at 08:21 PM.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    There's no such thing as 100% positive reinforcement. You are usually having to do negative punishment which is to remove the reward item for non compliance.

    Now that only works if the dog gives a rats about the reward item to the level that negative punishment will work.

    Saying that this is a dog that has laid teeth on people. A little positive punishment as a consequence to action can work fine to show the dog there are two sides of the coin in life.

    The only thing I would say is don't smack the dog. Smacking is physical altercation, and the dog is already happy to engage in it. Teach by example, punish/ignore the bad behavior and straight away show the dog the required alternative behavior and reward it. Life has to be balanced, too much punishment can shut a dog down or increase the dogs angst. You don't want to be nagged, dragged around and punished all the time when you're at work, neither does your dog!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    I think I've finally found the right balance
    Using positive methods for day to day manners, obedience and tricks and something more forceful or dominating to control the nipping/mouthing/biting
    The latter is not how I wanted to do things but after 8 months it is the only thing that has produced actual results

    I will try cutting out the nose tap Nekhbet and step up my angry voice a little
    It's not a *smack* I promise! But I understand she can perceive any physical contact that way
    She's not really being given the chance anymore anyway, if she puts her mouth on me or my partner that way at all she's outside, no chances

    Thank you for the dog park advice Kalacreek

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    It's always about balance and what works for that particular dog If there was one clear cookie cutter method that worked for all dogs we'd all be doing it :P The point of dog training is do what works and produces little to no byproduct behaviors that can bite you in the bum down the track. Few things are permanent, if you make a mistake, try and try again.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    There's no such thing as 100% positive reinforcement. You are usually having to do negative punishment which is to remove the reward item for non compliance.

    Now that only works if the dog gives a rats about the reward item to the level that negative punishment will work.

    Saying that this is a dog that has laid teeth on people. A little positive punishment as a consequence to action can work fine to show the dog there are two sides of the coin in life.

    The only thing I would say is don't smack the dog. Smacking is physical altercation, and the dog is already happy to engage in it. Teach by example, punish/ignore the bad behavior and straight away show the dog the required alternative behavior and reward it. Life has to be balanced, too much punishment can shut a dog down or increase the dogs angst. You don't want to be nagged, dragged around and punished all the time when you're at work, neither does your dog!
    I have one agility dog that I think I am about 100% positive reinforcement with at the moment. He never seems to do the wrong thing, that is he always earns his reward. LOL. Seems to be a long time since I withheld reward from him. Mind you he is fully trained. He was so quick on the uptake and so eager to work for reward, witholding reward was a very rare occurrence. He totally got it and we raced through the levels into Masters. I think setting the dog up for success and breaking things down into small chunks is the key here.

    I terms of a smack. I have found it can be extremely effective. I have a young cattle dog puppy given to me because she was inclined to resource guard and be extremly bossy, although very sweet, one day she proceeded to snap at one of my other dogs when he came near me. The first time she did it I gave her a quick, soft smack on the muzzle and she never did it again. She realised instantly it was unacceptable behaviour and is now as good as gold. Never smacked her since.

    The only thing that stopped another cattle dog from the dangerous habit of chasing kangaroos was a good smack, I was so angry because on several occassions she could have got herself killed, and this is a dog that will recall from nearly anything, except I discovered kangaroos when I first moved to the farm. She got such a shock when I smacked her that the next time she saw a roo she came straight to me and has never chased one again. Rather a smacked bum than a dead dog was my mantra. There wasnt a reward strong enough to pull her off a kangaroo.

    I virtually never smack my dogs, dont need to, but I will use it have I absolutely have to.

    However I agree that if the dog is ready to engage, then probably not the best option, nor is it something you want to have to use all the time.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-19-2013 at 08:35 AM.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    I say not to do it because we don't know the dog and the owner. I've seen plenty of dogs who get smacked and many have snapped back - most owners can't deal with that reaction and of course since it stops the smack the dog is then ready to go round 2. THere's always last resorts, heck I've had to kick a dog repeatedly once... I wasn't proud of it but I had no choice, it was a badly trained attack dog that was trying to put me in hospital, off lead and I even sent my fiance inside to get a gun (we lived on a farm at that point and any help would have taken at least half an hour to get there) I had no choice but to put a boot into the dog a few times to get it off me, luckily I also managed to ninja my way out of the road of a good bite.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Hi all!

    A little update for those interested

    I've been hand feeding Gracie since I started this thread and I'm very pleased to say any signs of guarding or aggression are gone
    She's happy again for me to sit with her, pat her, hold her bowl and take the bowl from her. I actually quite enjoy sitting down with her at meal times!

    As for the nipping/biting she is MUCH better. Of course there will still be the occasional puppy slip-up but she is basically bite free. In general she is much better behaved as well, she listens to me now when she hears 'NO', no jumping on the couch, no attacking shoes and clothes... Hanging out with her is a lot more peaceful and I'm extremely grateful for all of your advice. We definitely enjoy each others company even more than before!

    So again, thank you all

    Of course with the good comes the bad - Gracie now guards me from other dogs at the dog park
    When we arrive at the park, being such a brat, she barks her snout off to let everyone know she is there, something I'm hoping she will grow out of or will die down when the new dog park isn't as exciting
    But if another dog comes near me or even tries to nuzzle in for a pat or a sniff... Gracie comes running a million mile an hour to get between us or if she is already there she will bark and bark and bark until one of us walks away
    I've heard a lot of people say Kelpies/Border Collies can become 'one man dogs' I just didn't realise it could be so full on!

    We're off to the beach again this weekend to learn how to swim


  10. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    So very happy for you and Gracie..Bravo!

    Please baby steps..

    LEAVE the DOG PARK out of it for now
    Until you have a high level of obedience = very strong bond.
    Some dogs just do NOT ENJOY the dog park environment.

    You have come a long way with her, keep up the good work.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •