Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 81

Thread: My dog bit me...

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bunbury
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Maggie stopped the biting when my husband growled low and deep, spooked her. Took less than a week and we had tried lots of things too. We also left her alone and went to another room, they HATE being excluded. Every time. The climbing and biting has to stop or she will become seriously obnoxious. I have heard it said that every day you live with a border collie you are teaching it whether you realise it or not. They will learn behaviour and continue with anything that gives them what they want, for instance attention.
    It sounds like your pup is a bit like mine in that she is bright but wilful. We have seen a real change as Maggie has turned 18 months she has gentled down, some. They can get quite obsessive as they are bred to do one thing, sheep. We know that two walks a day with a lot of ball play is essential and yes they are busy bums.
    I do hear you and you are doing fine, they are not the simple to train dogs we are led to believe when reading the literature..lol
    I think by nature the kelpie and the collie are one person dogs. Maggie is often walked and fed by my husband and she likes him very much but as she matures it is clear I am primary.Nature I think, in the genes
    Last edited by farrview; 09-13-2013 at 01:22 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Can I ask - Gracie still tends to get in moods when she will climb over us and bite at hands and the like
    It sounds to me like you've always been on top of this
    Get up and lock her out of the room. Straight away, dont wait for her to ramp up. You cut behaviors before they start. You're adults, if she goes to mouthe remove your hands and walk off, no more playing and no opportunity to continue.

    As for the chilli on the hands, why are your hands there? Remove them, if she jumps up turn around quickly and ignore her. When she settles give her attention, if she starts again ignore her again. She will realise that her energy is wasted and there are quicker ways to get rewarded.

    You have a high intensity working dog, not a pet quality dog so you need to treat her accordingly. She's bred to boss around an animal that weighs hundreds of kilo's so you're no challenge. Now you have to be firm and smart - you can either get into a physical confrontation with her and bloody make sure you can win it (get the iodine...) or control her environment and resources. She works for all food, all attention, all everything to a HIGH standard. Don't be afraid to get tough, as her to comply ONCE and if she doesnt respond, miss out. Every piece of food should be worked for, scattering can come back when she's ready to respect you.

    Leerburg Dog Training | 17,500 pages of dog training information, 657 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis is a good place to start for some articles and if you want videos there's Michael Ellis on youtube to show you how to do some higher level obedience with her. If the biting gets to be a bigger problem, message or email me inline_k9 @ yahoo.com.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Thank you so much for your advice Nekhbet, really appreciate it
    So often we've been given advice by people who have beagles or cavaliers etc that just does NOT work with a kelpie x border collie
    I will look further into that link when I am home tonight

    If I really think about it (or I'm 100% honest) she sometimes gets away with it
    She may bite bite bite and after sitting there saying NO NO NO we'll FINALLY get up and stop her
    Or put her outside
    The moment she's let inside though... right back where she left off!

    We are generally pretty strict but I suppose on those days when you just cannot handle it anymore and it's easier to sit there and take it take away from the week or two of hard work before it

    Again, thank you! You don't happen to be in Brisbane do you? Haha

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    I have working Border collies and kelpies that are high drive and they certainly do not bite or have ever bitten. This is not an expected trait of these breeds if they are well bred. They may nip to control sheep in certain situations but they should not have the sort of temperament you are talking about.

    So I agree with NEKHBET that she is not a pet quality dog and needs to be trained with that in mind. She may have been bred for cattle. You absolutely need to control her environment and resources and in no way tolerate the sort of behaviour she is showing. I would get into to some concentrated obedience training and crate training.

    I wouldnt be scattering her food on the ground. I wood be feeding it from a bowl and asking her to sit before she eats or get her to work for every piece as suggested. I can remove anything at all from the mouths of my working dogs and they had better not even think about biting me, which they dont because I have worked hard to build a solid relationship with them based on a lot of training. They also have been bred with rock solid temepraments.

    Unfortunately poor temperaments are often tolerated in farm bred dogs if they have good work traits. I know a few kelpies round here with shocking temperaments. Well bred dogs should work when asked and have an off switch. Believe me there is nothing worse than a busy sheepdog when working sheep. Calm, steady, minimal movement with plenty of stamina is what is needed.

    As to nature, my Border collies will work for anyone, confident and outgoing and love to work and not fussy about who works them and I know many Border collies like this. My kelpie is similar although would she would prefer I worked her. My cattle dogs would rather walk on hot coals than be worked by anyone else.

    Dont kid yourselves that it is the terrible twos and she will grow out of it, if not dealt with it could escalate. At 2 years old my dogs are competing in trials and working sheep. Sure they are high spirited youngsters, but they are also well trained and well behaved.

    Good luck and glad you are taking this seriously.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-13-2013 at 01:52 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    So basically I'm far from the best owner out there
    Please tell me it's not too late to change her?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    If I really think about it (or I'm 100% honest) she sometimes gets away with it
    She may bite bite bite and after sitting there saying NO NO NO we'll FINALLY get up and stop her
    Or put her outside
    The moment she's let inside though... right back where she left off!

    We are generally pretty strict but I suppose on those days when you just cannot handle it anymore and it's easier to sit there and take it take away from the week or two of hard work before it
    Aaah! Big mistake - bite bite bite No No No, no wonder the dog is behaving like she is. You are allowing her to reinforce her actions and giving her no clear direction. Man, one bite and that would be the end of it. You got to act immediately. In fact you should be stopping her before she bites, end of story.

    This applies to all dogs, being a BC kelpie cross is no excuse. I know small companion dogs exactly like this. My collies and kelpies are easier than many other breeds to train. In fact they have been a dream to train. Their breeding was carefully selected for working traitis and temperament and I have put the training in.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-13-2013 at 02:04 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    So basically I'm far from the best owner out there
    Please tell me it's not too late to change her?
    You just going to have to put the hard yards in and perhaps get some professional direction. Some of it will also depend on her genetic temperament. Sometimes, no matter how good a trainer you are this can be a problem and may require ongoing management. I have had a dog with a weak temperament that was well trained but in certain situations I had to be very aware and manage her.

    I would start by really putting in some hard work and see how you go. You can try and turn this around and you will learn a lot.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    She's done Puppy Training and Puppy Training Advance - finished top of her class! haha
    We've even had the Paw Professor (a gent who has 20 years experience as a police K9 officer and trainer) visit to help us through this
    I believe one of his first comments after 15 minutes with her was "Wow... she's a tough one"

    I remember when we chose her, she was the one pup out of a littler of 11 that didn't come running to us
    She was the one who walked off on her own and started chewing a stick behind a tree
    I found that endearing...

    Things are changing today, from the moment I get home
    I guess I have to separate heart from head. I just want her to be a part of our lives, whether we be sitting around hanging out or driving to the beach
    I feel like if I'm 100% strict all of the time, with the way she is, she will spend 99% of her time outside or in trouble and that's no fun!
    I see the other side of it though... put in the work now and we will enjoy each others company much more in the long run
    It's been a stressful 9 months to say the least, no one's fault buy my own of course

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rubberlegs View Post
    I remember when we chose her, she was the one pup out of a littler of 11 that didn't come running to us
    She was the one who walked off on her own and started chewing a stick behind a tree
    I found that endearing...

    Things are changing today, from the moment I get home
    I guess I have to separate heart from head. I just want her to be a part of our lives, whether we be sitting around hanging out or driving to the beach
    I feel like if I'm 100% strict all of the time, with the way she is, she will spend 99% of her time outside or in trouble and that's no fun!
    I see the other side of it though... put in the work now and we will enjoy each others company much more in the long run
    It's been a stressful 9 months to say the least, no one's fault buy my own of course
    Unfortunately what you found endearing as a puppy was something I would have steered well clear of. I like a pup that will make eye contact with me and that is friendly and confident and shows interest in interacting with humans, makes it much easier. You can make training fun though. I like to do shaping exercises with my lot and let them experiment with trying to work out what I want.

    Once they understand this concept I can teach them all sorts of things. Same with making eye contact with me. I encourage this. So you can have fun as well as teach good behaviour. Perhaps you could do some agility foundation work. I do a lot of fun stuff with my dogs and at the same time I build a relationship and they learn. They know what I expect and what I will and wont tolerate and although they are a bunch of high drive working dogs they really are good dogs. I have a 9 month old working bred high drive cattle dog at the moment and she loves the agility foundation work. She is really learning to focus and become tuned in to me.
    However she is highly confident and has a great temperament although very much a bossy little resource guarder with other dogs when she first came to me, which I soon sorted. She has never shown the same inclination with humans

    Time will tell with your little one about what role her temperament is playing and how difficult it may prove, but I reckon you need to give it a good shot.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-13-2013 at 03:42 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Yes well one of the first things we were told was to choose the pup that comes to and responds to you, so I'm aware we've chosen a tough one!

    This thread has made it sound like Gracie is the worst thing ever. She isn't. She's a generally well natured, happy and loving little ratbag!
    I have no intention of ever giving up on her that's for sure.
    She is easy to train (biting/nipping aside, obviously) and does very well with sports, games and tricks - so hopefully if I stick to my side of the deal she will respond quickly and fairly well

    Please tell me more of agility foundation work?
    We're on a list to get her into herding classes which will be a lot of fun for her and us of course!
    I looked into agility courses when we first got her, most places told me we have to wait until she's 12 months old?

    I appreciate everybody's input
    This has been an extremely therapeutic day!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •