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Thread: Foster pup got parvo

  1. #1
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    Default Foster pup got parvo

    About 3 days after we got him, our 10 week old foster pup started vomiting. Then diarrhea. Then lethargy and no appetite. Which is when I had to rush him to the vet.

    I stupidly said no to a parvo test and IV drip at the first vet, because it wasn't the one that would give a discount to the rescue org. But he went downhill that night, I thought I was going to lose him through the night, so I rushed him to the "approved" vet the next morning. Which unfortunately is almost as far South as you can go in Canberra and we live on the far Northern edge of town. I nearly crashed the car when pup went all floppy on me (he was on the passenger seat) and I thought he'd stopped breathing, while I was going 100kph.

    But I realised he still had some fight in him when he yelped and jumped around for a whole minute when the vet gave him an injection.

    Three days at the vet on a drip and yesterday he was eating and drinking and his smyptoms were all but gone. So we'll bring him home this afternoon. I feel bad for the rescue organisation about the bill. They've had 4 pups with parvo in a week. I wish there was some way to force people to vaccinate their dogs, especially when they let them breed. But it's pretty rampant out in the country...

    It's a bit of a dilemma for me, because I now don't trust the rescue org's quarantine methods (you were right, Nekhbet!). I am not angry with them, they do the best they can with the very limited means they have.

    Banjo is ok as of course she is vaccinated so not affected at all. But now I won't be able to have any unvaccinated (or partially vaccinated) pups at my place for a very long time.

    I'm just happy the pup's ok. Can't wait to see him.

  2. #2
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    Sorry you had to deal with that. I had to go through it a long time ago and the image of my little pup on deaths door still haunts me. Its a dreadfull thing for such a little animal to go through. Glad he's pulled through.

    If hes still not keen on eating try some sardines or pilchards. Thats what my vet recommended anyway and he gulped them down but turned his nose up at everything else.


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  3. #3
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    I managed to stay strong and rational until I had to leave him at the vet - a few minutes after he got so very upset about being pricked with that last needle. Then I felt the tears welling up and it ended up being awkward because I didn't really say goodbye out loud as I didn't want to show the vet and the vet nurse that I was about to start sobbing. It's very hard not to feel sorry for such a young pup in that situation. It will be even harder not to spoil him rotten once he is home!

  4. #4
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    Three days at the vet on a drip and yesterday he was eating and drinking and his smyptoms were all but gone. So we'll bring him home this afternoon. I feel bad for the rescue organisation about the bill. They've had 4 pups with parvo in a week. I wish there was some way to force people to vaccinate their dogs, especially when they let them breed. But it's pretty rampant out in the country...

    It's a bit of a dilemma for me, because I now don't trust the rescue org's quarantine methods (you were right, Nekhbet!). I am not angry with them, they do the best they can with the very limited means they have.
    If you can't afford to look after the animals you have you do NOT rescue. It's not about pity, it's about proper care for the animal which is the point of opening a rescue ... well I thought anyway.

    This is why I bang on about quarantine. There are incubation periods and times of stress like going to a foster home can suppress the immune system. Bingo bango you have a now very sick pup with god knows what. I run a private rescue for ferrets and we have a minimum 30 day quarantine for all new ferrets no matter where they come from considering I have 18 of my own. Distemper and human flu is carried by ferrets, both are lethal especially distemper which has no cure.

    You're lucky the pup was only there for 3 days, my rescue rottie spent over 2 weeks on a drip and tested positive for Parvo and Corona.

  5. #5

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    My friend just went through the same thing. Rescue pup had parvo. Rescue group had to foot the bill.. 3 nights at the vet on drips etc. Pup is fine and happy but her other dog (whom she had for 7 years) got kennel cough?!
    I am disappointed with the rescue group and learned never to trust an adopted animal until *I* make sure they are clear but I do appreciate their effort and the fact they try to do their best to save those precious lives.

  6. #6
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    That's all very admirable but you tell me what other reasons anyone would have for rescuing the endless stream of discarded and neglected dogs from the rural pounds other than pity. Offering proper care should obviously be best practice but this isn't an attempt at winning the 'rescue of the year' trophy. Every week these few volunteers on the front line have to let dogs die in the pound because they don't have space. They also have some duty of care arrangements with local pounds to take in young pups. Not sure how that works exactly... Parvo is rare in towns like Canberra where most people regard pets as part of the family but far from uncommon in rural areas.

    And a young pup in quarantine for 30 days creates other risks because of the lack of socialisation at this crucial age.

    I don't think it was the length of the quarantine that was the issue here either. I think it was cross contamination, probably due to the difficulty in disinfecting a make shift quarantine area in a suburban house.

    And for some unknown reason black and tan dogs are more at risk from parvo. Weird, but commonly accepted by the veterinary community it seems.

    Anywho, pup is home, happy and very hungry. The vet bill was slightly less than expected too, just over $1000.

  7. #7
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    I run a 30 day quarantine for my ferrets but they are a totally different species. Like I said I run a high risk of distemper cropping up, and it does exist down in my area. There's no treatment or chance for Distemper, there's fitting, madness and death. It's why I stick to such a strict quarantine.

    That's all very admirable but you tell me what other reasons anyone would have for rescuing the endless stream of discarded and neglected dogs from the rural pounds other than pity. Offering proper care should obviously be best practice but this isn't an attempt at winning the 'rescue of the year' trophy. Every week these few volunteers on the front line have to let dogs die in the pound because they don't have space. They also have some duty of care arrangements with local pounds to take in young pups. Not sure how that works exactly... Parvo is rare in towns like Canberra where most people regard pets as part of the family but far from uncommon in rural areas.
    There is an old saying, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

    Yes we feel pity. But pity needs to give way to reality. Makeshift quarantine areas for the most high risk group of all in the canine world is not good enough. This is not a human issue, this is an animal care issue. Now too with parvovirus did the vets tell you your backyard may be a no go zone for other minimally/unvaccinated puppies for up to a year? Parvovirus has an up to 7 day incubation period before the symptoms show, the other option is Coronavirus which is actually worst. The pup caught it within the last week, so traceability is entirely possible if they keep decent records. It's why there should be a one week minimum quarantine period for pound puppies and enough Virkon to disinfect 3 suburbs on hand with foster carers trained in basic disease control procedures.

    Dogs die from parvo, some that make it through a permanently marred by the disease's symptoms. Better to save a few properly then put a hundred at risk.

    Some black and tan dogs are worst at making the vaccines stick, rotties in particular are notorious for being recommended extra vaccines. That part is true. But any pound puppy due to stress and patchy nutrition should be considered a high disease carrying risk. It's why I don't understand pounds/shelters that run boarding kennels right across from the pound dogs, way to go spreading disease.
    Last edited by Nekhbet; 09-09-2013 at 07:51 PM.

  8. #8
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    Wow Nekhbet, if you cant afford proper vet care, shouldnt rescue. That's a strong statement indeed.
    I am not sure i agree with it however.

    And dressed only in good intentions, we'll be rescueing waifs n strays, till our dying day, its what makes us who we are. What we are. All the way to hell, AND BACK.

    Sorry beloz about the pup! sounds really scary there at times.
    and ascertaining a dogs conscious level, one of the tests is a response to pain. And yep, there it was, a great sign to see in something that's floppy! and non responsive.

    As to you not saying goodbye verbally.
    Actions speak very loudly in touch n go medical situations. Ive seen grown men sob, pathetic women act real hard, coppers cry, vicars appear heartless. What we show of ourselves to others, is a nano particle of what happens on the inside.
    AND
    its what's inside that counts.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing. But ****ing useless live.

  9. #9
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    Yes, I am well aware about my yard now being contaminated and off limits to unvaccinated pups and it sucks. Not that I know anyone who has or intends to get a pup fortunately. And it's a blessing that immunisation rates in Canberra are very high. But it at least means that we won't be able to now foster little pups for the next year.

    Which this morning I'm actually not too sad about. 10 week old pup locked in a kennel for 3 days and with a seemingly unstillable hunger = one restless night. (I only just got a crate and no time to train him yet) Hopefully running around with Banjo today will make him a bit more sleepy tonight.

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