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Thread: shove yr hand in the food bowl while dog eating???

  1. #11

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    It's basic training IMO. I give and take food as I please, I generally praise the dog for releasing the bone without argument(i.e tug of war) and I feel fairly confident if one of my nieces or nephews tries to do the same that they won't get bitten(obviously the aim is for them to never try but sometimes "it" happens). I reckon it's dogs that aren't trained like this from a young age that become so called "resource guarders". I believe that resource guarding from humans is a basic lack of training

  2. #12
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    I can easily take food from both my dogs, they don't care at all. I don't think its a matter of showing dominance over the dog, its more a matter of showing the dog that they can trust you with food. When Koda was young, i always made him sit and wait for his food and i would often sit with him and pat him all over while he ate, just to get him used to the concept of being touched while he's eating. This has all paid off for me
    Although Dodge is good with people around food, she's never been good with dogs around food, and sadly she passed that onto Koda... i have to feed them separately.

  3. #13
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    I have encouraged and praised my Maxi to sit, down, look at me and wait for a hand and verbal cue to eat his dinner and breakfast. He does a very patient wait if his water needs changing (I think it's the triangle of temptation or variation of). And he always gets praise for doing what he is told. I can even put my hand in and take away or add without drama.


    Sometimes he tries to anticipate what he needs to do to get his okay to eat. But I try to change it up a bit with an extra sit or down or extend the wait. I guess I don't want him to play 20 questions but be sure that he is listening...


    My boy has been known to share his dinner with his cousin the cat. To the stage where he and the cat have both their heads in his food bowl. I'm fine with this but wouldn't let my sisters older dog do this with Maxi as my sisters dog is a food-guarder to the stage where he will snap with teeth if animal or human get tries to take or share his food.


    i just wish I could train my boy to drop/ignore any possible sharp,cooked bones he tends to find at my sisters as I've copped a split finger nail near the Quick (believe me extremely painful for days) when attempting to get this yummy morsel out of his mouth before damage was done. My boy can't do bones apart from crushed/ground in his dinner as any other way usually results in a vet visit. The crunch on my finger wasn't done on purpose he just was really enjoying himself chewing something that would have more than likely cost me x amount of dollars and caused him some pain or un-unwell ness for a few days or more.
    “All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed. For after all, he was only human. He wasn't a dog.”
    ― Charles M. Schulz

  4. #14
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    Much like everyone else here, I can do whatever I want with my dog's food or bones, and wouldn't have it any other way. That doesn't mean I do it at every meal or torment them with it, but I believe I have to be able to do anything with my dogs if the need ever arises. I know a girl who's dog growls at her when she touches his feet - bit of a problem if he ever hurts himself - and a problem for the vet too, nobody can touch his feet. I think it's a similar thing. What if your dog actually did pick up rat poison, wild dog bait, a block of chocolate from somewhere? Me, I want to be able to take it off them without dramas....

  5. #15
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    I dont train my dogs, till they can eat without keeping an eye on me. to me this indicates some trust from dog toward me. Up till that point, its all bonding.

    from that point, we do TOT, with all family members taking the lead

    we hand feed meals, even the kids, to teach gentle taking of food

    we teach food refusal to prevent kiddy ice cream thieving at shows/comps/fetes ect.

    Yes, i have met so called 'dominant' dogs. But back then were called pack leader. And that is exactly what they were, the leader of a 20+ pack of hunting hounds. Nobody considered this
    a) a problem
    b) something humans have say in
    c) wrong

    Outiside of this, i know from living the life of a submissive, that you need a submissive to get a dominant.
    and visa versa
    It is the dynamic set up by minimum of 2 creatures, not one.

    and i have a tiny rottie girl (in comparison to my or other dogs size), who will go as far as it takes, to teach dogs to stay away from her bowl! Yet when push comes to shove, she does as i or the GSD tell her. We just dont push that often, only when it counts. That is leadership, not dominance.

  6. #16

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    not blaming the ceasar for the problems this dog has developed, that's the owners fault, but what you think of the way he handled it?

    Cesar's Worst Bite - YouTube

  7. #17
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    i dont

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhru View Post
    Much like everyone else here, I can do whatever I want with my dog's food or bones, and wouldn't have it any other way. That doesn't mean I do it at every meal or torment them with it, but I believe I have to be able to do anything with my dogs if the need ever arises. I know a girl who's dog growls at her when she touches his feet - bit of a problem if he ever hurts himself - and a problem for the vet too, nobody can touch his feet. I think it's a similar thing. What if your dog actually did pick up rat poison, wild dog bait, a block of chocolate from somewhere? Me, I want to be able to take it off them without dramas....
    Yes paws are another area that I train early. I had one pup that was very touchy about her paws so I did a bit of work on her everyday with treats and now there is absolutely no drama which is good because of prickles and grass seeds where I live mean I have to check the dogs paws often. My current pup is a terror with picking up innapropriate items and I have had to fish things out of her mouth.

  9. #19

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    bernie, good post but not sure if dominance is a relative thing, dominance is imo a genetic trait that a dog has no control over and nothing external can control it either. dominant dogs are very rare literally one in a million or less.

    there is one dog in oz i know of that is considered truly dominant, quiet trainable to a high level but completely unreliable and unpredictable, the dog only lives under highly competent supervision and is kept alive as highly competent breeders know he has some valuable traits that are worthy of preserving with intelligent breeding.

    pups will never be available to the public.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Wow guys, great posts thanks, I'm learning things I didn't even consider before. When I read the first post I thought - why would you do that? But I can see that it can be a very important part of training especially to make sure they are socialising well with guests. I'm going to start making a list of training techniques to get started on when I first get my pup so he/she ends up being a beautifully behaved little darling.

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