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Thread: Searching for the impossible dog Pls Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Default Searching for the impossible dog Pls Help

    Hello all,

    I haven't had a pet since I moved out of home almost 20 years ago and would love of have a cuddle buddy back again. However I'm trying to find a breed of dog to suit very specific circumstances. My partner doesn't want a cat as we have a lot of native wildlife which we don't want killed and he's wary about a dog being too much work. I work full time but we have a large property were I could set up a dog run with appropriate food/water/shelter/toys. I also have a large spare bedroom which would be good for an indoors dog. I'm basically looking for breed options that I can discuss with my partner for a dog that could be relatively independant during the day (while I'm at work) either happily snuggling with toys in the spare bedroom or amusing itself outside within the limitations of a dog run, but then happy to have a cuddle and a walk when i come home. I'd love a lap dog I just don't know if it would get too lonely during the day?

    It would need to be a small dog, low maintenance/shedding and preferrably a quiet breed. I may be asking for the impossible but would love to hear from people about possible breeds to learn more about. Thanks guys.


  2. #2

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    the size will automatically filter out a lot of breeds, coat requirements narrows it done further as does quiet. does low maintenance = low energy to you? yr requirements do not seem that demanding. have you considered a rescue, lot of great dogs want a chance at a life, lots of puppy issues resolved and you can pretty much know what you are getting in most cases. you might even be able to try before you buy to see if it will work, less variables imo with a rescue and unless you are experienced you will most likely end up giving finacial support to an unethical breeder, simply in that you won't know the difference between a good and bad breeder in most cases if you have not had a dog in 20 years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    There are quite a few dog breeds that would be happy with that life style.

    If low-shedding is important, maybe start with this list: List of dog breeds with little to no shedding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Not sure how accurate it is, but it's a start.

    I encourage anyone to get a rescue dog, but if you have selected a breed and would like to buy from a responsible breeder, some members here can most likely give you some pointers on how to find one.

    And with any dog that is left all day, it takes some effort. I never leave for work without walking my dog, ever. Then I leave her inside with access to the outside with some food dispensing toys and usually a bone to chew on. I will often take her for another walk when I get home or if I don't, play a game with her or do some trick training. Sometimes I don't, but I regard the morning walk as the most important.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
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    Get a pug. Awesome little guys, not loud barkers (but they can snore if too fat so keep them trim) most are happy to amuse themselves during the day. As for the shedding, we have a black pug and I don't know how people complain they shed too much. She barely sheds, I groom her with a deshedding comb once a fortnight when I give her a bath and she's fine between. Personally I think weight and diet have a lot to do with it. She eats a raw diet, trim and fit, runs around like a little pocket rocket at almost 11 years old.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    I loooove black pugs! I met a teeny tiny black pug pup at the dog park the other day and he was extra adorable because he was walking amongst the big dogs (including some giant breeds) as if he just totally belonged there. Our neighbour's tan pug did bark quite a lot, but I am sure that had all to do with how they treated him. He had some other issues too...

  6. #6

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    personally i don't think it is good general advice to leave bones or chew toys with unsupervised dogs, i know most people do it and come back with the, but i have left bones with my dog for years and nothing ever happened...false logic cos whoever was alive before they died in a car accident never previously died in a car accident either, just sayin.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
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    Depends on the bone MB.

    If no-one is home - I like the marrow - joint end cross cut (or whole) not the split one.

    Size of bone must be suitable for size of dog jaws.
    Large bones for gnawing
    Smaller brisket for snack time
    Soup beef bones only if I am home.
    I try to have different bone types here at all times.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    I don't think a pug will make dangerous splinters out of a marrow bone the way my cattle dog does. However some pugs get so hungry they will eat the pebbles from the garden mulch.

    I'd like to suggest a Bichon Frieze or a King Charles Cavalier Spaniel. They will quite happily snooze all day while you are at work, and then go for walk with you when you get home. So will a greyhound - but they might be more of a risk for wildlife - if you let them off lead. Rabbits and cats would be at most risk. Mice and rats and small marsupials - less fun for a greyhould but you'd definitely want to avoid the rodent hunting terrier breeds.

    Bull terriers love being couch potatos and going for walks, and generally haven't got the speed for chasing animals. They can be mistook for bad guys by farmers tho who shoot first and ask questions later. So if you do get a dog like this - best to take it round to meet the neighbouring farmers, and train it so it never gets the idea that chasing sheep is fun.

    My farmer friends have had Labradors, aussie terriers (will kill what cats kill), and british bull dogs for house pets. Most of my current farming friends just have a farm dog as companion dog. They will do what you train them to do - but they do need you to give them lots of mental exercise as well as physical. Bear in mind the life of a farm dog is to spend lots of time chained to their kennel or in a run until it's time to round up sheep - which isn't always every day. Some get off for a daily group zoomies around the house yard.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Thanks guys, some interesting choices here. I've always been wary of pugs because some ppl think the way they've been bred is cruel resulting in serious health problems, just read an old and very heated debate about the pros and cons of the pug/cavalier cross! I love the look of the Cavalier and i definitely need a low activity dog, preferrably one that happy to sleep or play with toys til I come home. Any other advise on the Cavalier?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    When i read your requirements, i instantly thought the Cavalier would be a good choice for you They would happily chill all day and spend time with you in the afternoon. They have a very soft, loving temperament, they're gorgeous little dogs

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