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Thread: why not call show/pet & orignal style dogs different breeds

  1. #11

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    Too much rubbish and ignorance in here about purebreds to even start and reply to it.

    But for those talking working dogs, lets not forget how many of those get shot/put down or dumped at country pounds for lack of working drive or ability too. Just like racing greyhounds. Working line bred does not guarantee working drive or ability, just like show line bred doesn't guarantee perfect type either.

    These are living creatures, not cars or electrical goods. What is with this expectation people are developing for guarantees on everything about them?

  2. #12

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    did you post this in the wrong thread??

    i don't get what you are responding to??

  3. #13

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    Nope. Right thread.

  4. #14
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    we had to work out completely new systems of stock "management" we organised and developed the concept of coordinating choppers, coacher cattle, bull catchers, hesion yards
    Who are you? Troy Dan? None of this stuff is new. My mum grew up on a farm, my dad spent all his school holidays on farms - and so did I, my mum's parents and her parents and her parents parents grew up on farms... and most of my cousins on both sides. Never lost the skill of managing stock with dogs.

    Just because you found one feral farm - doesn't mean the whole country lost it.

    Tony Parsons has a very interesting take on dog training - he's very good at it, just using personal experience but without the combination of that and some science - so he won't ever be as well recognised as someone like Bob Bailey. And Tony would be the first person to "cull" a dog he couldn't get to work. His books are tad scary expensive. I know of people with a bit of training science understanding who have taken failed working dogs - and gotten herding and agility titles with them. Just because the trainer can't get what they want, doesn't mean the dog is no good. It might, but it also might mean - that's not the right trainer for that dog.

    The other thing I vaguely remember about Tony Parsons - is that he doesn't take on a dog for training until it is 6 months old. Which to me - given what I know now and wish I knew when my dog was a puppy, you miss out an a squillion learning opportunites -the main one being to teach your dog to work through frustration and persist trying new things until they come up with what you want.

    So Muttboy, your posts remind me of me when I was about 16 and knew everything about everything.
    the first chopper pilots were suicidal self medicaters from the vietnam war
    Seriously? I know a Vietnam veteran chopper pilot - he walks his spaniel at the same park as me. And he is one of the most laid back people I know, and he's got a very grounded sense of what's important in life. My dog loves him - because he feeds her gingernut biscuits. And in exchange - she licks him in the ear. Which he says he doesn't like but he does. He keeps rewarding it.

    You can't generalise about Vietnam veterans. Or cattle chasing chopper pilots. There are much easier ways to manage cattle - even semi feral ones in the outback and it does not involve scaring the crap out of them for days on end.

  5. #15

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    Hyacinth, i should have said in the areas that i worked in with the chopper pilots i met the above occurred and likewise in similar places at that time.

    "and so did I, my mum's parents and her parents and her parents parents grew up on farms... and most of my cousins on both sides. Never lost the skill of managing stock with dogs."

    then they are clearly not the groups that had to walk away due to circumstances beyond there control and leave the places go literally back to the wild, so their experience is not relavant to what i described.

    yes you are correct that it is not general for all places, just big chunks of land in the northern end of the country across three states such practices occurred.

    just like what is true for your experience is true for you and many similar places but not true in general evidently.


    "There are much easier ways to manage cattle " what was done was done out of necessity, certain place, certain time. things were better before that time and things have improved thankfuly since.


    sheesh ya really gotta be exact in yr wording.
    Last edited by muttboy; 07-24-2013 at 02:44 PM.

  6. #16
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    mmm, you do appear to have to be correct in your wording muttboy.
    I'll just say, from a pet owner's reading point of view, im finding it great reading.
    thanks

  7. #17
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    did you post this in the wrong thread??

    i don't get what you are responding to??
    Nattylou is responding to the fact you think there is such a massive divide between working and pet lines. There is no 100% strike rate that a whole working litter will work, and vice versa. It's about best chance of getting a dog you need in breeding, but overall you will find breed traits still pervade no matter the lines. To call them different breeds is not correct because they still are the same breed with the same distinct features that make them so.

  8. #18
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    Lots of over generalisations, MB. Reminds me too of the time I thought I knew everything. Generations of farming here too and also nothing was lost so no, it didn't die out in the 70s, just some areas may have, not the whole. Farmers are also renound for rebounding from the hard knocks so the dogs would have been in work again when restocking was able to be done and THAT depends on the individual farmer's/station owner's/consortium's circumstances and bank managers.
    Last edited by Di_dee1; 07-25-2013 at 10:58 AM.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  9. #19
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    Hint, easiest way to muster stock is to limit their food and water supply to the area you want them to be in.

    And if you feed off the back of a truck, pretty soon you can lead them where ever you want with the truck and all you will need the dogs for is to get through the gates without taking all the cattle with you.

  10. #20
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    Priceless Hyacynth.

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