Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40

Thread: Cerebelar Abiotrophy

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Westen Suburbs, Melbourne
    Posts
    39

    Default

    just an update here.....Drover's aggression is lessening, but once again I keep a very controlled situation with him.
    He's a happy little guy but 2 things I'm seeing escalate is his need for constant human attention.
    He loves being patted and massaged and cuddled but the minute you walk away he's whining and howling.
    I just let him work through that himself and he does settle down. But it does take some time. I just worry about what our neighbours think.
    His falls are way more significant and he's really knocking his head about and he shakes ALOT (like he's shaking water off himself).
    He's taking a lot longer to become stabalised. He can barely right himself to do a wee or poo. Well he has to squat to pee,
    cause he just falls over when he raises his leg.
    I feel the downward spiral has begun. I just dont want him hurting himself.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Personally I would be making a decision about his quality of life. If he's having that much trouble getting about and causing himself harm, well if it was my boy I'd let him have peace. But I can't see how much quality of life he currently has

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Westen Suburbs, Melbourne
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I feel that too Nekhbet. Yesterday he really smacked his jaw on the ground.
    Did this big yawn like action and looked a bit dazed.
    The other party who gave him to me, likes to have updates on him.
    I feel like They're not seeing the situation as it really is and he can just keep going like this.
    I also feel like a bit of a scapegoat in this and feel they've fobbed him off when it all became to hard to
    make "the decision".
    He had a good day today.
    He can seem ok one minute and totally struggle the next with the most basic of doggie routine.
    I'm quite torn, so i guess a vet visit is what i need to do.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    It's no failure to call it quits and I agree, it's not fair you got the end of the rope per say when it came to this dog. The aggression to me is a big sign he's uncomfortable and feeling vulnerable at the very least. I know, when it comes to the good day bad day thing it becomes harder still. My rottweiler would be the same, some days he would get about fine others he would not want to get up at all and cry at me until I tucked him in and doubled his supplements/gave him a tablet. I still was in two minds the day I took him to the vet, his hip finally failed but his brain was still so alive it tore me up. But a 50kg dog in constant pain that was limping on an already skewed leg was no life.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Westen Suburbs, Melbourne
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Oh god yes the crying......its getting pretty regular now.
    Gees so much in your last post Nekhbet is exactly the same here.
    Anyway.......phone call to the Vet tomorrow.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Good luck R.M.

    I'll be thinking of you and poor Drover tomorrow.

    If the vet thinks he needs to go to sleep feel free to come back on here and let us know. Theres a lot of caring people here who will support you and help you through with a listening ear and kind words if you need to speak about it.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  7. #17

    Default

    'Rambo'smum' - I am really very sorry with all you are having to deal with at this time - all I can offer you and Drover are Heaps of and Best Wishes.

    Decisions like these are never easy - we have all been there - second guessing ourselves all the time up to the last minute.

    Please remember - that as part of the joy of owning a pet is the final gift that we can give them - to be able to go with dignity !

    Be kind to yourself !

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Ive seen this disease in humans. And it follows the same path in human and canines. Due to the part of the brain (gross motor skills) it attacks.
    you get the wobbles, uncoordinated gait, standing with wide legs as if to brace yourself against a fall. They fall over. And in mid stages, the atrophy (death of cells) in brain is so severe it begins to affect behavior, and you start to see personality changes.
    Previously polite old ladies with decent respect for Dr's and Nurses, are telling you to **** off when you arrive to visit them. They become hostile and aggressive. And regulating the emotions is a lost skill eventually. So that verbal spray becomes a physical assault of loved ones, or the grandchildren. And eventually time for old folks nursing home.

    There is no cure, onset is usually from birth. There are 'degrees' of being affected by it. Mild to severe. Dogs are accident prone, bodily unaware of extremities.
    Some dogs live out a normal wobbling/shaking life, undeterred. Some go fast downhill, till its pull the plug time.

    This is where stem cell therapy will cure one day, but not yet alas.

    Due to the area of the brain that regulates gross and fine motor skills, it can also affect the dogs emotional regulation. eg. Not biting humans, or if you do bite, be polite and stop at one bite. The dog becomes unpredictable, and often over reactive.

    This is what i lost my first ever dog to. He was 9 months old. We had been to a obedience comp. He'd one, we just got back in the house, when i clumsily trod in my pup's foot. And he turned. On me. Out of the blue. I still had him on leash, and used my strength to hold the dog off me.
    Took him to vet and was diagnosed Jacksonian seizures, secondary to the brain atrophy from CA. And at that point i PTS. He'd only been diagnosed the month before, when i took him with a nodding head and tripping over his feet. Unusual behaviour for a BC indeed!

    Only you can decide when the time is right. But my suggestion would be, do it now. Its coming anyway, and start again to find a companion dog for your other.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Westen Suburbs, Melbourne
    Posts
    39

    Default

    well vet appt made for 2.45pm today.
    Thanks everyone for your support.
    I know what i have to do, but he's only been in my care for a couple of months.
    And i'm bloody furious that those before me, didn't research this and do what
    was right long ago.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Thinking of you today, take care

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •