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Thread: Dogs in cars

  1. #11

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    HMMM... so how much are those crates for safety, or because they can then be used for containment?

    OK. I look at that harness and while I am no crash expert I can't see where that will not injure the dog at 100KPH. It may well _restrain_ the dog and prevent it becoming a missile, but....

    Here's my thing. Seat belts work (and they do still cause sever bruising and broken ribs) because they allow negligible movement before they start restraining...you never "hit your straps", so to speak. So you are stopped from moving almost instantly and then released by a few inches to cushion you. Any harness that allows freedom will let the body keep moving and then come up against restraint....the result is usually a more dramatic deceleration....you "hit the straps". Seat belts also have been designed to fit the human body's stiffness and strenghts. I do not feel that dog harnesses have. The whole hindquarters of the dog are free....broken back.

    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    Some more information for Qld:

    No Cookies | The Courier-Mail

    'oldNick' - a link for you - this is the dog seat belt recommended - there was a blog on it - but they have recently updated their website - so now I can't find it !

    Ruff Rider Roadie Car restraint | K9 Pro

    Most people who show or do sports with their dogs use crates in their cars or barriers of some sort to keep their dogs safe. Crates are also used to keep the dogs contained at the different events they attend.
    Nick Peg n Benny (or is it Peg n Benny n Nick?)

    (nTess, forever in my heart)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Unrestrained distractions
    Any distraction - if you have a prang and you blame your screaming kids for distracting you - you get done for neg driving. There is another offence somewhere for "persons" who interfere with the driver..

    The same applies if you are eating or drinking in the car and you drop something in your lap and prang as a consequence of that.

    Not sure if there is a rule for spiders that crawl out of the air vents. Given they're not something you could have anticipated or caused or gave permission to travel in your vehicle. Just generally better if you pull over and stop before you go into phobia hysterics.

    I couldn't find the dog-ute rule - but there is one about securing your load. So if something (the dog) can fall off the ute then you can be in trouble. Someone who was a regular in here, did it to his dog, his dog was tethered so he could get his head out into the wind, but also if the ute went round a corner a bit too fast, the butt of the dog over took the head end, and the dog ended up dangling over the side of the ute, by his collar... that dog could reach the ground so his feet got injured, as the ute wasn't going very fast when it happened. But a lot of dogs get killed this way. They'd possibly be better off completely unsecured... but not if they fall off into the path of oncoming traffic, or hit a tree. Currently the safest thing for a dog on the back of the ute is a shaded heavy duty crate. And the crate has to be secured to the ute so it can't come off.

  3. #13

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    Yeah dogs on utes...I had wondered about the fling factor. I have had dogs on utes unfettered back when nobody cared. 95% of them were OK. One I had was no good because she kept compensating and ended up just shuddering and shaking ar every move, instead of going with it...she ended up in the cab...maybe not so daft after all .

    The other stuff. hmmm....again so much open to interpretation and mea culpa. You own up and you are in trouble...kids have to be a big one here. But a couple of drunks in the back of the nominated driver's car??

    Spiders. I once nearly smacked into a stationary car, on a country road bend, in the dusk. The most STUPID piece of parking. But the poor bugger had a Huntsman walk around on him (including across his face)while he was negotiating a bend. He chose to avoid oncoming traffic and just stop. Now I am OK with arachnids in general...but yeah in the gloom, with one of those fast-moving, large, skittery buggers on my whatever, I will probably not concentrate well. I had a good torch and we...sorted ...the problem

    He DID forget to turn on his hazard flashers...again...YHTBT.

    So where does THAT stand? That and a fit of sneezing (which has been used as an excuse)?
    Nick Peg n Benny (or is it Peg n Benny n Nick?)

    (nTess, forever in my heart)

  4. #14
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    Sneezing is tricky - cos you can't do it and keep your eyes open...

    So one quick sneeze you might get away with but if you're somewhere tricky like a windy road - then you'd better slow down or stop.

  5. #15
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    For me, with sedans or hatchbacks my dogs have always been well behaved (and on leash), with someone in the back holding them. Not foolproof since a sudden injury would hurt everyone, but hell I've only gotten my license in the past year (therefore, I can now make the rules in my car ). Parents can be very stubborn when it comes to who's right..anyway imo dogs should always be restrained somehow. Even if it's only in a cage. Wouldn't want it to get under the steering column (think if a crash happened while it's on your lap, it'd fall down between your legs and the dash, and that is not pretty..). Also with big dogs they could easily block your view trying to see something or in a sudden panic. Just asking for trouble with the dog-on-lap scenario.

    Car barking is a def no-go - agreed there, Nick. I've had the good fortune to never have a car-barker, but watch out if I ever get one. Loud noises are distracting

  6. #16

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    Somebody actually caused a fatal and got away with it by claiming a sneezing fit....

    I have never tethered or confined dogs in cars and in over 30 years have never had any trouble. But on this trip, with lots of high speed stuff andf a big bus to fly around in, I now have my padded cage....and the dog will have one too....
    Nick Peg n Benny (or is it Peg n Benny n Nick?)

    (nTess, forever in my heart)

  7. #17
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    May 2009
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    I think I'm just going to keep my dogs tied on a short chain in the back of my ute. I can't afford a crate, nor do I want one since I use it for hauling a lot of big stuff (tables, aviaries, building materials) so I'm not wasting a good deal of the tray on a cage. I would consider having them loose except I can absolutely see them jumping out the back if we're stopped in traffic and they see a bird on the road or something. First time I had them in the back I had a lead tying them up, they managed to snap it from pulling so much, so now they get a short chain that barely allows them to get their nose out the back of the ute. For the 'fling' factor - their chains are short enough that they can turn 180 degrees each way without being able to get any part of themselves over the edge. I like having a ute though because having them in the back of a car is a pain - they slobber everywhere, they shed like hell (two half white, long haired dogs..fun), and there's always a doggy smell on them which permeates the car. Not to mention the muddy feet after creeks and stuff - the dog blanket barely covered that. I'm glad they're not in the cab anymore hahaha.

  8. #18

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    OK. How do I deal with this? Over the years I have altered my attitude about my canine mates SO MUCH. I did so much wrong. I probably still do. But I can no longer trivialise my companion dogs' comfort and wellbeing.

    I want to encourage others to get it right earlier.

    Apart from any moral bits. You get back what you give. OK...that's not true, your doggie mate will give back far more than you deserve 99% of the time....they have for me. BUT. If you look after their physical needs, they live longer. You get that....that...payback for longer. You stave off the loss when it ends. And for me it has been a huge loss.

    I do not want you to turn your canine into a lap-dog, but if you have cabin space available, let them in. Sorry about the smell, but maybe more baths....sorry about the moult, but you want that love...pay for it.

    Look. Years ago I went free-camping in a station wagon with just my dog as a mate. It was a spiritual journey...just me and nature...and my doggy mate, who did not get in the way, but did provide me with joy and amusement. One morning we woke and it was COLD. The reason I woke was that my doggy was shivering and vibrating the wagon...so I kicked her out. Today I am so ashamed of that. I had not provided for her in the first place, and when she shivered she was treated badly and abandoned. I can still remember the puzzled look she gave me, but _then_, I just wanted her gone.

    I guess I am trying to say that dogs may be "tougher" than we are and they will love you no matter what. But _invest_ in them. You will have a healthier dog to share life with, and a cared-for dog will "last longer"

    bleat over
    Last edited by oldNick; 06-27-2013 at 08:58 PM.
    Nick Peg n Benny (or is it Peg n Benny n Nick?)

    (nTess, forever in my heart)

  9. #19
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    For the 'fling' factor - their chains are short enough that they can turn 180 degrees each way without being able to get any part of themselves over the edge.
    Nope - but you can still snap their necks. A harness - with a clip at the back is better... like one of these
    Clean Run: Bergan Auto Harness
    - note this one does not depend on the plastic buckles to stay attached.

    But something like this and re-inforced (so it didn't depend on plastic buckles) would be even better. The design needs some work - to make it right for car travel / accident safety.
    Tripawds Blogs | Ruffwear Review Best Harness To Help Three Legged Dog | Three Legged Dog Amputation Canine Bone Cancer Support Information Help Advice

  10. #20
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    Brisbane, Qld
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldNick View Post
    OK. How do I deal with this? Over the years I have altered my attitude about my canine mates SO MUCH. I did so much wrong. I probably still do. But I can no longer trivialise my companion dogs' comfort and wellbeing.

    I want to encourage others to get it right earlier.

    Apart from any moral bits. You get back what you give. OK...that's not true, your doggie mate will give back far more than you deserve 99% of the time....they have for me. BUT. If you look after their physical needs, they live longer. You get that....that...payback for longer. You stave off the loss when it ends. And for me it has been a huge loss.

    I do not want you to turn your canine into a lap-dog, but if you have cabin space available, let them in. Sorry about the smell, but maybe more baths....sorry about the moult, but you want that love...pay for it.

    Look. Years ago I went free-camping in a station wagon with just my dog as a mate. It was a spiritual journey...just me and nature...and my doggy mate, who did not get in the way, but did provide me with joy and amusement. One morning we woke and it was COLD. The reason I woke was that my doggy was shivering and vibrating the wagon...so I kicked her out. Today I am so ashamed of that. I had not provided for her in the first place, and when she shivered she was treated badly and abandoned. I can still remember the puzzled look she gave me, but _then_, I just wanted her gone.

    I guess I am trying to say that dogs may be "tougher" than we are and they will love you no matter what. But _invest_ in them. You will have a healthier dog to share life with, and a cared-for dog will "last longer"

    bleat over
    My dogs are already part lapdog, very sooky and so on, and I'm not keen to turn them into even more so. I love them loads, so don't take the wrong impression. My car is a two seater, so no, I don't have the space to let them in. Even when I'm driving alone they'll still be the in the back of the ute. Plus Bonnie is on heat, so there's NO way I'm having a bitch on heat in a car. I do pay for the love - emotionally (and financially). I don't mind getting fur all over me and smelling like dog when I go to cuddle them. I do mind my car smelling like dog and having fur everywhere, so they're not travelling in the car haha. Also, I already get told I bathe them too much (once per week) so that's a no go. I don't trivialise their comfort, but when you consider that the furthest they go in the back of the ute is about 5km (very local parks), it's nothing. Even on a longer trip I would still take them in the back of the ute - they love the wind, and if they want to get away from it they just lay down (have seen Rebel do it a couple of times).

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