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Thread: NEW Dog not being welcomed to the pack

  1. #1

    Default NEW Dog not being welcomed to the pack

    Hi There,

    we have recently added a new puppy to our home, Joey. Joey is a Red Healer X Staffy who is very smart.

    Our problem though is our other 2 x Maltise X Dogs (Missy 7 and Max 6)
    They have been around dogs with no problems but these dogs have been adult and larger breeds.
    they will not interact with the new dog and have even been snapping and growling, this has scared the young puppy but he has not retaliated.

    note the 2 small dogs sleep inside at night and the puppy is outside, is this a problem?

    Any help would be great.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default

    My thoughts are that you are going to have to put some work in here. The new pup is going to grow into a much bigger stronger dog. Some adult dogs just dont want to interact with a puppy especially if it is boistorous and the adult dogs are small. I would probably be inclined to invest in a crate and crate train the new pup. I would have him sleeping inside in a crate near to you so that you can toilet him in the night.

    I would be training the puppy in basic manners and I would very closely monitor interactions. If the older dogs dont want to play with the pup, perhaps you could take them all on short walks together, all suitably under control on leads perhaps. I wouldnt force the issue but I would be working on basic manners and making sure the puppy is suitably exercised and mentally stimulated and has a safe place to relax in - such as a crate.

    If the situation is not dealt and time invested with you could find yourself pushing the new pup outside more and more which will further isolate the puppy.

    I am sure others will give you good advice. I personally dont tolerate snapping and growling from my dogs unless it is for a good reason and the puppy is being pushy. This is your job not to allow this to happen to the older dogs.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-06-2013 at 10:07 PM.

  3. #3
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    How old was Joey when you got him?

    Most small dogs are defensive when it comes to approaches from big clumsy dogs. Especially ones that they don't know.

    And it seems like your puppy is lacking in basic dog social skills - so you will have to supervise and separate before your little dogs feel the need to tell him off.

    You may also want to spend some time with special treats for your old dogs for being calm around your new dog. Don't give them any treats if they act grumpy (and your puppy is being polite and keeping his distance), but if they act calm around your well behaved puppy - give them some really yummy food treats.

    Puppy sleeping outside at night - especially if he is very young - may well be a noise problem for your neighbours. Personally - my dog sleeps in the bedroom next to me and has done since I first got her home. Much easier for her to alert me to problems that way.

  4. #4
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    I was worried about the same thing when I got my pup as my old girl had been an only child for 10 yrs. I took the Caesar Milan advice and we pack-walk every day. Worked a treat. Within 4 days Sal was even sharing her bed with him (before that she was quite aloof and put out), I couldn't believe it. Obviously training will always make having a new pup more pleasant for everyone (dogs included) but I'm a pack-walk convert when it comes to getting other dogs to accept a new addition to the pack. Good luck with it

  5. #5
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    What's the difference between a walk and a pack-walk?

  6. #6
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    Not much really except the pack-walk is very much about the leader being in control and in front - as the alpha of a pack would do. If all dogs recognise the leader as dominant the theory is they accept each other as equals and part of each others pack. I highly recommend seeking out Caesar Milan's explanation (which is easy to find with a google search) and not rely on my minimalistic and uneducated explanation

  7. #7
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    I have found over the years that being in control is probably more important than being in front. My dogs can be where they like on our walks but when I call they all come running. I think that there will always be some hierarchy. I have multiple dogs and they all get on well together but there is hierarchy in the ranks which they have worked out and I do have an old matriarch and she has been wonderful with new puppies and all the dogs defer to her. However I have spent a lot of time training my dogs and they all defer to me. Fortunately new puppies have always been well tolerated.

    I do however agree that in this situation some controlled walks together is likely to be a very good thing. Worth a try.

  8. #8
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    Orright. My overly simplistic and one dimensional interpretation of your minimalistic and uneducated explanation is such that a 'pack walk' is a walk where the dogs behave themselves.

    In that case I think I continue to stay away from Cesar... too much macho-fluff with too little substance

  9. #9
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    Yep, I agree with you both completely. The term is just a commercial creation no doubt, and there is certainly off-leash time where control is the important thing in a 'pack walk'. I apologise if I mentioned any no-no names, I'm not promoting him in any way, or claiming any great knowledge myself, just saying this one concept made sense to me and worked. Oh, and Kalacreek - 'equals' was definately the wrong word for me to use - my dogs have a heirachy between themselves too. Anyway, I'm going to stop talking now...

  10. #10
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    margoo

    Dhru is new here... not familiar with how we feel about Cesar Milan.

    Hint - most of us regulars don't like his methods much because he gets bitten a lot and people who follow what he does get bitten a lot and the dogs in his shows are clearly distressed and upset - even at the end when he says they're "calm submissive" - they look terrified and upset to me. Ie a fear bite looking for a place to happen.

    How about providing some links to counter what Cesar does instead of giving the newbies shit about it.
    David Mech - whose research Cesar Milan bases his training methods on - David says it's not right to connect his research on wolves kept in small cages - with what pet dogs do. My interpretation is that's a bit like using research on people in prison for teaching primary school kids.
    L. David Mech

    The best stuff on how wolves operate is with Shaun Ellis
    CanineSquad - Shaun Ellis
    CanineSquad - Shaun Ellis 2

    and this is the AVA position on it. (USA vets)
    http://www.avsabonline.org/avsabonli...0statement.pdf

    Bottom line - you stop your dog from behaviours you don't want - stop, interrupt, distract, and then you promptly give them something else to do. Put as much as you can of the behaviours you want to control - like digging or going sniffing - on cue - "premack" them - give the dog permission to do what he wants - after he does something you want.

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