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Thread: New Mastiff Wolfhound Owner

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bundaberg QLD
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    Cheers Dhru,

    Donht be to worried about the zoomies....My goofs do it too and theres a huge dent in my brand nesw shed where Mojo crashed into it !! The 2 dogs playing is a good sign hes not fased by her or dog aggressive so thats a win. Jumping is what does the real damage but that dosnt sound like its a issue for you.

    Dont let him graze....as in eat when he wants. The other issue with this breed is they can easily get Bloat which will kill a dog quickly.....gulping food then heavy playing or running can twist thier bowels over then its pretty much lights out if not caught quickly. Its for this reason both my dogs are fed at night only, seperately then seperated for the rest of the night. They just chill out and snooze after dinner...but they both still gulp thier food quickly.

    Try taking his food away after 10 minutes or even less. He'll soon get the message to eat it or loose it. But i stress the dinner only at night time thing. A frozen marrowbone or cow hoof during the day is good for them too.

    I'm no behaviour expert sorry. What you should do is start another thread about his anxiety and the people here who know lots about that stuff will see it and no doubt help you out. Call it "anxiety issue" or somthing like that and the experst will be on it sooner or later. Good luck.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Bad news Dhru...

    Wolfhounds drool too. Almost as bad as blood hounds - they can completely cover a smaller dog in slobber with one affectionate wipe... We've got one that shows up at our park regularily for walks - and we all avoid it like the plague - unless the boss is carrying a drool towel for clean up. It's very affectionate in a wet slobbery way.

    For the big running dogs - it does help to yell as they come close - to remind them to look where they're going. They can crash into fences and it's not pretty. But the worst is when they crash tackle humans by accident - they can break knees and hips this way, and have you ever sat down where there isn't a chair... not fun.

    I have done a lot of random "drop downs" with my dog, so I can ask her to drop pretty much anywhere - and she will drop and stay and then I can protect her or catch her or whatever I need to do. This is something you can work on up close - at home - with no distractions and great treats or the dog's dinner.

    Anything that got my dog excited - I would make her drop and hold that until the exciting thing was gone or less exciting. This included scary things (like fast cars or angry dogs) and fun things (like cats). I would do the keep walking thing if the thing she was scared about was dangerous - like crossing busy roads but otherwise we'd drop, stay and wait it out.

    If you want to desensitise him to some of the things that make him anxious - find out what his threshold distance is - how close are you when he starts showing signs of upset, like looking away, lip licking, sniffing and looking and sniffing, sitting to scratch etc.

    Pay attention to how far that is, and work on simple training exercises just a little bit further away than that distance. Then start varying the distance - sometimes closer, sometimes further away and very gradually reducing the average distance. If you can spend a few minutes of each day working on this - it should help eventually.

    Also he is probably into his "second fear period" of puppy development - so try to protect him from anything he finds really scary cos he's not going to be the least bit sensible about it.
    http://www.dogforum.com.au/puppy-dis...-calendar.html

    As for the food problem - if he doesn't eat it immediately (my dog gets 10 minutes), take it away until next meal time... so he doesn't get the idea that it will still be around in an hour for him to graze on. (What Riley said).

    And for the other dog - get her some sort of slow food toy like a black kong or a squirrel dude or for dry food - a bob a lot and load that up with her food so she can't eat it so quickly. You can also get weird food bowls with bumps in them (like the knobly side of a lego brick) which slows a dog down when it comes to eating.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
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    Wow, all great stuff, thanks guys. BUMMER about the hound drool, slobber towels here we come...

    Ok food first. Sal doesn't eat fast, she's just perpetually hungry. No meal is ever big enough for the poor girl but anyway, I have been inconsistent with Abe. I started doing exactly what you both suggested and then started to worry he wasn't getting enough food. I'll go back to it straight away.

    I read the puppy calender before I joined up and noted his stage. His threshold distance is as far as he can see (with the sighthound in him thats quite a way). The instant he spots something he recognises as scary he shows signs of his anxiety which is getting tense and jumpy, head comes up and ears forward, fixes on the thing and starts pulling on the lead. He doesn't get a whole lot worse as we approach except for the pulling on the lead. He will walk directly past, pulling, if I am between him and it, balk if I'm not. Once past he continues to look over his shoulder and fall over his feet and bump into me until it's nearly out of sight.

    Now I'd like to ask Sean a question about his mastiffs. How have they been to train? How are they with a drop? Abe knows it, will do it, but really, it's like, "I dunno if I really want to". Sal has always been instantly responsive with training. Abe's doing great, but he's very different, and doesn't seem to have the motivation to please in the same way she does...
    Last edited by dhru; 06-07-2013 at 04:52 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Bundaberg QLD
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    My Bullmastiff is pretty well trained...until zoomie time when he turns of his ears and i dont exist !!
    But apart from that he's pretty good. Once the collar and lead are on he knows its time to chill out and listen. I initially trained him through a group school and used a check chain (which isnt as bad as some would think if used correctly). These days he responds to the same 'checks' but through his normal collar.

    The drop was the hardest.....all these little kelpies and other small dogs where dropping like flys around us but the big fella wasnt to keen and definently wasnt fast. And you could read his mind when i asked him to get up again. **FFS...i just got down now you want me up again ??? Grrr**. Maybe its a big dog thing but Mojo hated the whole drop thing too. To the point where after awhile he would just roll on his back and go all silly. That was a sign to back off as he was totally over it.
    Mind you we didnt use treats to train then. At home he'll do ANYTHING for a small piece of sausage !!!

    As for Bronx, my Mastiff bitsa...if food isnt involved he isnt involved LOL. But surprisingly his recall is amazing but its because hes absoloutely obssesed with me. Where i go Bronx goes....which at times can be annoying beyond belief when he tail whips me and steps on my feet constantly !!!

    Training schools are surprisingly cheap....i paid $50 for a 8 week course which was 2 hours a week and lots of homework...kinda like doing it yourself but a tuter to help you along the way. Check out any in your local area. It may also help a bit with the anxiety thing too with lotsa new faces and dogs around. Worth a try anyway. Good luck.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
    Posts
    388

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    hahaha - Abe's a tail-whipping foot-stepper too. CONSTANTLY. Every pair of shoes (and socks) I own has a muddy paw print on it. The roll on the back go silly part of Mojo's drop training applies here too

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