Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Research to find the perfect pooch has started

  1. #1

    Default Research to find the perfect pooch has started

    We are looking to welcoming a dog into our family next year - at least that is when we will actively start looking. We have three children and our youngest will be at school then, so I will have a bit more time to focus on a new family member, and our children will be old enough.

    We're busy looking to see if there is a dog breed that matches our needs. Initially we would have been happy to rescue, but this has been made more of a challenge as our oldest son (7) has an allergy to some dogs. We've been reading up on dogs that are less likely to be an issue, but understand there are no guarantees. Obviously this would mean we'll probably need to have our son interact with any potential new four-legged family member to ensure there isn't an issue.

    We were hoping for a medium-ish sized breed, short haired and traditional 'dog' looking breed (ie; long nose, short coat). We'd entertained the idea of a Whippet, though they are a sight hound, so with the other pets - maybe not? Also, I understand that perhaps an Italian Greyhound might be more likely not to cause an allergic reaction for our son. Labs and Golden Retrievers might have been an option with their sweet, happy personalities, but I fear the allergy put paid to them. Not really keen on wiry coats, and the only good reason I have is that I don't have a reason, it's just personal preference - I hope I don't offend any wiry-haired dog lovers, I like to pat dogs and being used to cat fluff, wiry hair is just too far the other way I think! Oh, and if there is ANY dog that doesn't suffer from wet dog smell, please do tell, it is the one thing I can say I will NEVER get used to!:P

    Info that might be helpful as far as the dog's requirements are that we live in a house with a backyard of average size (sorry no good at measures), but it's fully fenced. The pooch would go for two walks a day (minimum) five days a week (school run), and a walk a day on the weekend almost always. I like a dog who is well-trained, the dog I had as a child was a labrador foxie cross and he was very good at doing all the basics like 'sit', 'stay', 'shake hands' etc - he and I were best buds and even though I was only 8, I did all the training - he was a beautiful boy Anyway, we don't 'need' a guard dog, but it never hurts if they are a bit helpful with a warning bark now and then. He would be able to be inside (some rooms). I say 'he' but if there are some breeds where a male or female is the better option, I am happy to hear it. We had a guide dog puppy (before the kids were born) and SHE was darling! There would be someone home most of the time, or if we were out, the dog would often come with us (other than zoo/museum type days). They need to be OK on their own, even if only rarely.

    Less keen on some of the other options for allergy 'safe' dogs as many require more grooming than I can guarantee to offer. Besides, I don't really want a very little dog. Don't know about some of the 'doodle' dogs? Are they a good option?

    Anyway, we're going to give it plenty of time to hunt about, but I am happy, and in fact keen to hear from those who know dogs - and dog breeds, and especially love to hear from anyone with ideas about allergies in relation to dogs. I know every sufferer is different, but all info can help us I am sure.

    So, is there even a dog that fits the above criteria? I know it seems a lot to ask, and maybe it just wont be possible. We take the responsibility of any pets 100% seriously, so we wont be jumping into anything, we get the commitment, so if we can't find the right pooch for us, then we just wont go there..........

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    Sorry, please excuse me 'replying' to my own thread here, still getting to know how to do things Just wanted to mention, my personal preferences (ie size/confirmation/coat) are not deal-breakers. If the right dog was in some way different o my ideal, that's cool, I just thought I would list ALL the info I could, so I wasn't backtracking when someone suggested (say) a French Bulldog, so I would then have to say, 'Thanks but is there a dog with a longer snout'? Thanks again!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I think I wrote a pile of stuff in response to your other thread.

    My best suggestion given your list - would be a bichon friese or a bedlington terrier - both will need clipping every 6 weeks or so (because they don't shed) - but you can learn to do that. And neither are likely to eat the other critters - the bichon slightly less likely to than the bedlington. But if you meet some breeders they can advise better about the personalities of their dogs and puppies.

    Here's some more research.

    As for low allergy dogs - this site has a list. No cross breeding doodle breeder can promise you a low allergy dog. Sometimes they get lucky and sometimes they don't. And sometimes those dogs are H U G E.
    Pantone Poodles - Poodle Info - Whats in a Doodle?

    Read the link on "responsible breeders" and the smart puppy buyer guide
    Choosing a puppy | RSPCA Australia | For all creatures, great & small.

    How do I avoid supporting puppy farms? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    How do I avoid supporting puppy farms? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Everything the RSPCA has on puppies...
    RSPCA Australia knowledgebase / Puppies
    What is a backyard breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    everything you need to know about raising a puppy so it doesn't end up at the pound
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    Read the bit "before you get your puppy":
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    An interesting guide to choosing a puppy - I'd use what is useful or practical and not worry about the rest too much, you want the friendly puppy.
    Volhard Dog Training and Nutrition: Behavior and Training: Behavior
    Volhard Dog Training and Nutrition: Behavior and Training: Behavior

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I hate it when you type a bunch of stuff, go looking for a link then close the entire window, tabs, answers and all. Argh.

    Anyway someone else is looking for a puppy too - this is what I wrote for her. The main thing is puppies take time. If you want to meet some puppies this time next year - now is the time to start choosing your breeder and helping them to get to know you. Cos it takes about a year to make a quality litter of puppies happen.

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/general-d...tml#post190451

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    For some reason i can just picture you guys with a Labrador....awsome dogs !!

    I had one as my first dog and i suffered very badly from Athsma and alot of allergy problems like House dust mite, horse hair, cat hair, shellfish etc, etc.....was a real shocker with it. But my Lab never seemed to affect me at all.

    LOL....Labs have doodles...well the male ones do anyway !!

    Ditch the 'doodle' breed ...as Hyacinth has mentioned....puppy farmers dont need more customers....they are the scum of the doggy world and will leave you with a dog that could turn out to be anything but what you wanted.

    Good luck with the dog hunt...and good luck with your sons allergies.....with some luck he'll get better as he gets older.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    What is your son actually allergic to? The hair or the dander/skin proteins? Or the saliva? I think before you get ANY breed find out what your sons problems are.

    I'm hideously allergic to the oodles, I get lumps along my jaw line that are almost like mini hematomas, and my arms/face burn. Unless someone has washed them within the past couple of days I tend to get that reaction. Most other breeds so far, good with.

    Once you work out what he can tolerate then go out and choose on personality and what suits your training level as well. If you plan on the dog being outside only you might be better off with an older rescue already used to that lifestyle.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    oh I forgot to say - most of the breeds that need clipping (don't shed) aren't that good as outside only dogs.

  8. #8

    Default

    WoW! Thanks for the great start everyone! Will be reading up on the links over the course of the next few days. I hadn't an idea that only puppy farms were doing the doodle breeds, and yes, I have noticed a family at school have one and she is a VERY tall dog.

    The bichon frise and bedlington terrier both seem to have some pretty 'out there' haircuts. Is a breeder going to care if we just got our pooch trimmed to the equivilant of a 'number 1' haircut? I don't intend to show our pet, they would simply be a member of the family, so I'd prefer to go the route of 'cut it all off' every six weeks if we end up with a dog that requires a trim. They are very sweet looking dogs with their hair looking quite soft, no idea if that is the case? I would consider it a bonus if the other pets are at less risk from these two breeds of dog too (of course I wouldn't take chances anyway).

    On the question of allergy. I admit we've not had a proper test done. It's been obvious to us that our son's reaction is almost instant when he pats an animal, but as to dander or saliva I am unsure. His eyes puff, become red and weep, he feels miserable with it, his nose runs. Looks like the worst case of hayfever ever. He adores dogs too, which makes this all the more cruel. He's had no issues with cats, rats or guinea pigs, just dogs. Nekhbet, you are right of course, it's on my list of 'to do's to find out exactly what he's allergic to. Your idea of having an only outside dog and doing a rescue of a mature one, is something we'd not considered under the circumstances thanks, it is one to keep in mind.

    Sean, I do hope you're right about our son growing out of his allergy. I've been fortunate to never have experienced anything like it, but he's so miserable when it happens, I wouldn't wish it on anyone. It feels almost like it's a boy's (and girl's) right to grow up with a dog, I hope he wont be deprived!

    Hyacinth, thanks for the tip about meeting breeders. I wasn't sure how a breeder would feel about me saying 'We'd love to come visit with some of your dogs, so we can see if our son has an allergic reaction'! I guess we will need to keep a couple of breeds in mind, and see how he goes. After all, no use thinking that a dog would be a 'perfect' fit in our family if all the boxes are ticked, only to find out that one of the children can look but not touch!

    On the footnote, if the right dog turned out to be an 'inside' breed, then so be it, that's also not a deal breaker for us. If they are the sort of dog that doesn't need or want to be outside all the time, we'd absolutely work that in

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    I think get the sons allergies properly investigated before getting a dog and have him meet the breeds. If you're not sure whats causing it you could end up with a very allergic child no matter then breed or he sensitises to the dog within a short time frame which has happened before, and you are now stuck with a dog your son cannot go near.

    Bedlingtons, poodles etc breeders do not mind if you do a utility clip, the show clips are a LOT of work and noone expects you to keep them in that condition all the time

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    The Bichon frieze and the Bedlington have the softest nicest fur ever. Think cashmere. The clean ones anyway. And they're fairly easy to keep clean, if their environment is fairly clean. They're not attracted to muddy puddles like Labradors, Golden Retrievers and Lab crosses are. At least not the ones I know and they all get plenty of opportunity.

    Bedlingtons have had some health problems in their lines - so you will probably want to check and see certificates for DNA tests and what the breeder has checked for.
    Disorders by Breed - Bedlington terrier - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    My uncle had a pair of Bedlingtons that had health problems - he thought he was going to lose them - but they changed the dogs' food and they got much better. Still going strong now. One is very out going and the other is quite shy, so you have the range of personalities there. There is another Bedlington that comes down the park and she is tiny but very energetic and runs big circles everywhere. But she doesn't get walked quite as often as she needs, perhaps. All these dogs have an even clip all over so they look like fuzzy freshly shorn lambs.

    The bichon I meet - looks like a powder puff pom pom most of the time. He's very cute and always seems completely calm. No circle work there at all. He would need much less exercise than the bedlingtons. Though they're happy to be couch or lap potatos.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •