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Thread: Dog shelters..

  1. #11

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    I have had some really crazy reasons some rescues have turned down homes. Some I never understood but I guess their rescue their rules. Glad you found a dog and are happy with him/her

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    2,634

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    As an aside though, while I dont look like that now, I am still not what I would call a "respectable" type when I am in my casual clothes (Im a bit messy and scruffy and unkempt) and I am concerned when we go for a purebred, the breeder might judge us on that too.
    From my experience breeders generally are more interested in what you say and how you communicate with them about your attitude and experience with dogs than appearance. I am usually dressed in my jeans, work boots and farm clothes and look like a farm worker. I have had some great conversations with breeders and never had a problem getting a well bred dog.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

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    Quote Originally Posted by muriels man View Post
    I got a mixed breed from a backyard accident(byb?) She's now vaccinated, micochipped, desexed and never seen a flea or tick.
    Whist I was in hospital she did an ACL and I had the option to put her to sleep because its not cheap to operate.This never entered my mind so she had the operation. Unfortunately as with being a larger breed whilst recovering from the operation and the weight being transfered to the other leg she did a second ACL, Two days out of the hospital out of work 6mths they gave me the same choice. Guess what I chose YES THATS RIGHT THE OPERATION. She was 4yrs old then she is now 8yrs and still chasing rabbits(had to stop a dog doing this on a 50 acre bushblock without chaining them up).
    Several things to comment on here. I dont know why they thought you irresponsible but their are many shelters really working hard to do the right thing so donations are valuable and will help save many dogs.

    Your story with your BYB dog highlights to me why BYB who breed without knowledge need to be avoided. Cruciate problems are often related to poor structure and end up costing people a lot of money or result in the dog being euthaniased at a young age. I myself have a poorly structured rescue from a BYB dog that required 2 cruciate surgeries. Supporting breeders with good breeding practices and knowledge of structure and the ability to plan and choose the right pairings reduces the chances of this and also the chance of dogs ending up in shelters in the first place.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-08-2013 at 01:25 PM.

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