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Thread: Two puppies? GSD and Doberman

  1. #1

    Default Two puppies? GSD and Doberman

    G'day,

    I currently own a 5 month old GSD (Female)! Work colleague has offered me an 8 week old Doberman puppy (Male)! Just wanted thoughts on whether the two dominant breeds would conflict and whether it could go pear shaped even if trained and socialised well! In saying this, my GSD loves others dogs and is hard to control when she sees another dog due to excitment with no aggression shown at all. Thanks

  2. #2

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    I wouldn't unless you were planning on getting a Doberman or had thought about it before the offer.

    This dog will be with you for many years, things to consider would be...

    *Does the breed suit your lifestyle
    *Would you have gone out of your way to get this breed/Do you have a preference for another breed
    *Does it bother you that the dog won't have papers and can't be shown (I'm assuming as I doubt a breeder would causally go around asking their work colleague's)

    Unless this is your ideal dog, its best to wait for the right one

    As for already having a pup, I can't really answer that one so I hope someone else can give you some advice.

    Good Luck with the decision
    Last edited by Julieanne; 04-13-2013 at 09:47 PM.

  3. #3
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    5 month old GSD (Female)! Work colleague has offered me an 8 week old Doberman puppy (Male)!
    So you have one dog from a dodgy breeder - that lets puppies be rehomed way too young and maybe hasn't done anything to prevent genetic problems. And now you want another puppy cos some work person doesn't want it? Or they want to charge you money for it?

    I would say no because

    If I am getting a puppy from the breeder, I want to meet the puppy's parents and see what kind of dogs they are personality wise - cos that gets passed on to some extent to the puppies. So if you have two really anxious parent dogs - you're going to have anxious puppies. Or angry parents... angry puppies. I'd be looking for super friendly. In the parents as well as the puppy.

    I'd also want some idea of the health of the parent dogs, and maybe grand parent dogs if the info is available - from a breeder - it should be. So I reduce the chances of ending up with scary vet bills from joint problems or a blind or deaf dog later. Or a whole bunch of other horrible genetic diseases that dogs can get that cost lots of money.

    I'd also want to like the human in the equation - so I feel like my money is going to someone who is responsible, cares about the health of their dogs, and the well being of the breed. And will help me if I have any problems or questions about their puppy.

    But if I'm not going to get a puppy from the breeder, I'm going to a rescue (eg RSPCA or AWL or maybe AWDRI) to give an unwanted puppy a home. And that way my money is not going to reward and encourage people who are doing all the wrong things as far as dog breeding goes.

    So your choices could all go pear shaped because you didn't choose a reliable responsible breeder in the first place, or you could get lucky and fluke a healthy combination.

    I don't think it has anything to do with "dominance". And while both breeds require super consistent training from people who have really good "mechanics" - their timing with rewards is deliberate and precise - I don't see that a super observant and clever dog is necessarily "dominant". All dogs that I know are hedonists, and will seek immediate gratification and make all their decisions based on that if you let them. Most dogs are good at training their owners. SWF - are probably the best at it. Does that make them Dominant? Only if the handler lets them.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    So you have one dog from a dodgy breeder - that lets puppies be rehomed way too young and maybe hasn't done anything to prevent genetic problems.
    How do you know that?

  5. #5
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    In saying this, my GSD loves others dogs and is hard to control when she sees another dog due to excitment
    Until this problem is totally under control and your dog is obedient dont think of another pup of any breed. You need to work on the dog you have, not double trouble.

  6. #6
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    Erm... What is SWF?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    Erm... What is SWF?
    Small white fluffy !

  8. #8
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    You have your hands full with a GSD pup and she's going to get much worse till she starts to mature, because GSDs are monsters as pups.... as are many other breeds so why would you want twice as much trouble...I wouldn't. Why do you call Dobermanns and GSDs Dominant breeds, I have owned both and I find them to be big sooks and wonderful family dogs...who love their people.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  9. #9

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    The issues here are not that your dogs would fight with each other, although not impossible with a male and a female growing up together it's unlikely you would have serious squabbles. You will probably need to feed separately and make sure you don't leave prized items lying around but most people I know with a male and female (of working sporting dogs) can keep them together quite happily. That said, these people are clear leaders for their dogs. What people mean when they say that GSD's and Dobermanns are dominant breeds is that, if true to standard in regards to temperament, dogs of these breeds will take the leadership position if they don't feel anyone else is occupying it effectively. It doesn't necessarily mean they want to be number 1 or that they won't respect a good number 1. What it does mean is that you need to be a clear number 1 in order to have effective control of your dogs - otherwise they can make decisions on your behalf about how 'the pack' will interact with other dogs, people and objects. For example, they may like some dogs, they may want to fight with others and what you think/want won't come into it.

    My issue therefore is that if your current dog doesn't see you as number 1 (and if she's hard to control as a 5 month old then that's a pretty good indicator to me that she doesn't), you could very well end up with 2 dogs that don't listen to you and that you struggle with. If you struggle with them you're less likely to take them out enough to get the socialisation and training they need, just because 2 dogs, and 2 large dogs at that is actually a lot of work.

    Also, 5 months old is still pre-puberty. Owning 2 puppies is never a great idea for all sorts of reasons and especially if it's your first experience with a large dog. It is so much easier waiting until one is old enough to help you with the training rather than potentially hinder it.

    All that aside, I would never agree to take on a Dobermann if I didn't know the parents and lines well. I own a Dobermann cross but he was deliberately bred and I have met several generations behind his breeding and his breeder has over 30 years experience with the breed. The reason I say this about Dobermanns in particular is not only are they subject to a whole host of physical health problems if bred indiscriminately like all dogs, there is also unfortunately a high prevalence of temperament issues. To give you an example, I recently worked with a friend with a young male Dobermann that she obtained from a BYB. This breeder claimed they were breeding working dogs. I'm not a trained expert, but this is not a useful dog or a safe family companion in my opinion. In order to produce dogs that acted defensive and protective, this person it seems has inadvertently selectively bred for very thin nerves. Subsequently, this dog appears to be easily overwhelmed by stimulus (I'm talking even just people walking on the other side of a park) and responds with aggression. The dog looses control of itself around very low levels of stimulus and we can't get through. He reacts before he thinks because his nerves are so thin - he nearly attacked the guy's wife one night because she had a towel on her head. And what use is a dog for protection if you can't take it out anywhere because you can't trust it?

    Thin nerves are a common problem I have seen in Dobermanns. It's an expensive breed and people think they're getting the same but for cheaper when they buy from a BYB but you're not. In my opinion temperament issues are the most serious concern but Dobermanns are also prone to cancers, Wobbler's disease, cardio problems - you name it they got it sadly.

    And if the puppy is only 8 weeks old, how long has this person had it? Either they got it at the appropriate age and decided what overnight that they didn't like it? Or they got it earlier and the pup has left its mum too early and you're predisposing yourself to yet more potential temperament issues.

    Enjoy your 5 month old would be my advice. If you want 2 dogs, wait until you know who your girl is and have some reliable training commands in place (after 12-18 months) and then see about finding a good match for your family.

  10. #10
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    Kristy.Maree

    Based on what the OP wrote about getting the GSD in his (or her) other thread. Ie got the puppy way younger than it should have been rehomed and had some problems related to that and other things that went wrong.

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