Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35

Thread: The Danger of walking your dog.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default The Danger of walking your dog.

    Last week I was walking Chloe my GSD puppy down the street on a lead when a large bull breed type dog jumped over a small fence on the other side of the street and ran over to attack me and Chloe. I managed to fight off this 40 kg+ dog with 5 to 6 kicks to the head and get away...if I hadn't Chloe would have been killed for sure and I could have been seriously hurt.

    Got home and ran the council and was told a ranger would be sent out, well no ranger came so the next day I rang council only to be told that nothing had been done because we're too busy and it could take up to a month to investigate... what a bloody joke. So this dog can do the same thing again until council gets off it's lazy arse and does something, I don't blame the dog or bull breeds as dog breeds are not the problem and we have tough laws in place for this.

    I blame these Irresponsible owners and the attitude of the council which is reluctant to enforce these laws. Dog attacks are a big problem but instead of employing more rangers to protect residents and coming down hard on these so called owners, council would rather spend the money on long lunches and numerous overseas trips to their sister city...what a bloody joke.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  2. #2

    Default

    This is a subject which concerns me also

    It might be a child the dog attacks next.

    I have two small dogs and I am always wary about walking them in areas unknown. Many times we've walked our dogs (on leads) only to be confronted by people with their large "pig" breeds straining at their leashes and nearly ripping their arms out - totally out of control ... "Oh, Boris wouldn't hurt a fly, he's so gentle!" Bull dust!

    Up until recently, I've always had larger dogs, and always had them under control and confined. It isn't that difficult, and if the dog cannot be controlled you shouldn't have it in the first place.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Three things worry me 1. could happen anywhere.
    2. the attitude of the bloody council.
    3. what if it had been a child walking their dog.

    I'm just walking my rescue puppy, trying to teach her to walk on a lead and she could have been killed. I bet the other dog has never walked on a lead or been to obedience training in it's life....I was also told that sometimes it's the same people over and over again.

    I sent a letter to four newspapers telling them what happened, so maybe council might be shamed into doing something as I'm not the only one this has happened to and won't be the last either.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    middle of nowhere
    Posts
    310

    Default

    What a horrible thing to happen mate, let's hope it is not a kid next time, and that the letters to the paper give the council a kick up the bum for it. Glad to see you're putting the blame on the right end of the lead, so many people are too quick to blame the dogs.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Two ways to get a rocket up the council staff.

    Mention this problem - by email or by phone - to your ward representatives.
    every council is made up of councillors who set council policy which the staff are supposed to follow as directed by the council CEO. They're probably horrifically underfunded - but an email that clearly states you think the dog is dangerous because it jumped a fence and attacked you and your dog (you could also report to police), is trouble with their insurance if they have been clearly warned, and the dog does hurt someone, they may not be insured having failed to act when you warned them.

    Of course the ranger is probably more scared of the dog's owners than you - or their boss.

    Mention it also to the NSW local government ombudsman
    NSW Ombudsman - Local government

    and if that doesn't work - mention it to your local state government rep - or their opposition candidate.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    31

    Default

    I had a huge dog (German Shepherd cross I think) jump a fence when I was about 13 and attack my border collie x. My dog didn't have an aggressive bone in her body and had no idea what to do so she just stood there being attacked. Being only 13 and having no idea what to do I jumped in between, pushing my dog away and just kept trying to push the dog away (clearly now that I am much older I realise the error of this). When it actually bit my arm I pushed my arm as far as I could into the mouth to lock the jaw so I could minimise damaged and forced the dog between the fence and my arm. This probably saved my arm and my dogs life. It took about 3 mins for the owner to come out and grab his dog. I had been bitten on the stomach and the arm neither of which were terribly bad but had broken the skin and left puncture wounds.

    When I asked the owner what what had taken so long (as I had seen him look out earlier but not come to help) he said "oh he usually just snarls and charges the other dog and then gets over it. I only came out when I realised he was charging you". I mean are you an idiot or what...you know that your dog not only attacks other dogs but you do absolutely nothing about it.

    Needless to say the council did nothing about that dog either.

    If im walking in a dog park I now carry a walking stick...Sad but true.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Taringa, Brisbane
    Posts
    56

    Default

    I know exactly how you feel. I was attacked by my neighbour's GSD a few weeks ago and all council have been able to do is request self-closing gates be installed. I called council to report he was loose and roaming but they didn't care, he spotted me on the street and went for me. He also attacked a neighbour of mine who came to help me. After getting away from him i called the police in hysterics who promptly sent a crew out to assist. The dog was contained, but nothing more has been done. If i had had any of my dogs with me that day they would have been killed, no doubt about it. Now every time i have to take me dogs from my front door to the car (to go to the park) which is my unfenced front garden i have to go alone first to check that the GSD is actually contained in his yard with the gates properly shut. Second to that, i leave my shovel in the front garden, just in case. I carry a walking stick and would carry a flip-knife if it didn't carry such heavy penalties. However, i am now carrying Mace which i know is also not legal, but frankly, stuff that. If it's the difference between my dog getting killed and me getting charged with carrying Mace then i'm totally fine with that.

    Friends of mine had family visiting at Christmas just past. Their father took their Shetland Sheepdog and five year old daughter for a walk around the block. Just as they were about to head back through their front gate the neighbour's two staffies broke through a poorly secured gate and attacked the dog. In trying to protect the child he couldn't do anything to help the dog for a few minutes. When the little dog was finally dragged away from the attackers he was so badly injured he was dead by the time they got him to the vet around the corner. He had been torn apart right in front of their eyes, on their front lawn, in front of the whole family. And it could have been their child. What's happened to the staffies? Nothing. They couldn't prove anything. So they are still sitting behind their inadequate fencing, ready for the next poor victim to walk by.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

    Default

    This kinda thing makes me only walk my dog in on lead parks. Where everyone HAS to have there dogs on leads. My dog is only a tiny maltese cross dog and i would not risk her for a second. She was attacked by another little dog once but that was because my friend and i didn't introduce them properly: my dog was on a lead, she trusted her dogs and open the front door thinking they'd stay back while we went inside but she went straight for panda's face. I don't blame her though because we both know the dog was only protecting its property. These things happen sometimes.
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  9. #9

    Default

    And if any of the above attacking dogs had been a "Pit Bull" I bet the dog would have been despatched within 24 hours - especially in Victoria.
    I would suggest that you ask your local councillor to accompany you on your walk and when he gets attacked by your neighbours dog, I reckon you will get some immediate action.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    Yes I have had a similar experience with a very large male rottie. It was very scary, I thought it was going to kill my cattle dog. I was prepared to fight it off but fortunately a very large guy quickly came to my aid and supplied the required brute force to kick the dog off. It was a terrifying experience. Another time I was able to run in to a strangers backyard with my dog to escape a large dog. I have had 2 friends with very small dogs who were not so lucky and their dogs were mauled to death.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-18-2013 at 12:38 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •