Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35

Thread: The Danger of walking your dog.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Ive suffered at a stray malamute dog attacking me and my two pooches. The warden did nothing. A week later, the dog attacked a child. PTS.
    That child attack could of been prevented.
    As a result of that attack, i now have a breed specific dog/dog aggression from Bernie, all artic breeds are fare game.

    I got knocked down to the ground, and shook for a fair while and then went home. I was suprised at how much this event had shaken me. I had lost my nerve with my 2 dogs. Did not feel confident to walk them etc etc.
    I persevered and MADE myself keep going with my 2, and got over it. But i can imagine other owners might not.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Taringa, Brisbane
    Posts
    56

    Default

    So sad that we all have to carry that sneaking fear that it might happen to us, our friends, our dogs... I could never own a small dog for this reason, i would always be far too worried that one bite from a larger animal would be the end. Sadder still to know that i don't doubt the day will come when i will again have to defend my dogs and while up until now the injuries i have sustained have been minor, the next time they might not. I'm lucky i don't scar easily.

    I truly worry about my parents walking their dogs. Try as i might to teach them they don't seem to be able to learn to read dog body language, probably the single most important thing in preventing an outburst. All we can do is educate ourselves to better recognise volatile dogs/owners/situations and do our best to avoid them.

  3. #13

    Default

    I think everyone should spend a little time thinking about what would be the best course of action if a random dog did attack either you or your dog. Put on the spot with no prior thought leaves you and your dog especially vulnerable. If you have a plan of attack(well defense i guess) on how to deal with such situations the chances of a good outcome for you and your dog are greatly improved IMO.

    Edit : I'm pretty sure i've posted this analogy before, but think about two different people driving their car. Both people have found themselves without room to stop, driver A has never thought about how they would react in this situation so just hit the brakes and end up crashing up the bum end of the car in front ... however, driver B has thought through this scenario and has instilled in him/herself that he will look for someone to steer to that will avoid crashing. Driver B steers into the bike lane(or nature strip or whatever) and avoids damaging either vehicles as his/her instincts had been trained in how to react. Obviously there are no gaurantees in the outcomes but having a plan of action for certain situations in life in the back of your mind will certainly increase the odds of avoiding nasty situations.
    Last edited by mymatejack; 03-18-2013 at 09:38 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    I've been lucky in that when I have come across unfriendly dogs that have rushed us I've always had Bella. With Harley it would be a different story. Probably not the right thing to do but in the past I have just picked the fatty up and waited for the dog to go/kept walking.

    I remember when Harley was younger we had a staffy run over from its front yard one day and Harley wasn't impressed, I ended up sticking my hand in his mouth so that he "bit" me (wasn't a hard one or anything) instead of biting the puppy all the while its owners were laughing hysterically watching from the front yard... I am sure they would have been laughing if their pup was bitten though. This was before I knew all about DA etc.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    The danger for one woman this morning was me, and my 2 dogs.
    What she saw was 2 killing machines diving into her 2 cute as, poodles, the tea cup variety. Screaming, afraid, folorn that this was their 'last walk'.

    All that angst for nothing. The 4 dogs had a great game of chase. Which she yet again, interpreted as mine trying to catch them, but to eat them.

    Sometimes, folks see danger when there is none. I wish she'd let her husband walk them that early, as he's cool, knows dogs language far more than anxious mum, we chat, whilst they chase each other.

    sometimes, DANGER is in the eye of the beholder.
    And if you remove the first letter D, your left with ANGER. Angry people that hide behind their dogs, whilst they metaphorically bark over a fence to me.
    Whatever!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,700

    Default

    Well people with small dogs sometimes pick them up when they see me with my cattle dogs. They are in no danger but they dont know that.

    One of my friends had her papillion killed by an on leash GSD as she walked down a street with her dog on leash. It was over so quickly no one had time to react. The GSD slipped her leash and the papillion was dead in an instant. The owner of the GSD claimed that her dog had never shown aggression before.

    So even though it vaguely annoys me when people rush to pick their little ones up, it is totally understandable, little dogs dont stand a chance if something goes wrong.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-19-2013 at 09:43 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Taringa, Brisbane
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Decided to remove my post, it would probably upset people.

    Another question that comes to mind is; If your dog is being attacked, and you fear for it's life, and you have the means with which to kill the attacking animal, would you?
    Last edited by shooshoo; 03-19-2013 at 11:58 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    I guess the answer to this is, i dont know.
    I know what id like to think i'd do, but till you have been in those shoes, you never really know.

    During the attack i mentioned in my 1st post, i got hurt by being knocked down by my dog bernie who jumped in front to protect us. The noise was so horrendous!
    I remember the noise to this day! The adrenalin was pumping real fast i can tell you. I was useless, shaky, gibbery blob on floor, no good to man nor best. I had 2 dogs that were a team, against a lone stray malamute. Why such panic?
    So you never really know how you will react.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Id like to think i could do what i do at work and dominate the dog before they even get close enough to bite me. Works nine times out of ten. Maybe i'd crap myself and run up a tree LOL.. but seriously i'd do my best to dominate it. If Bronx was with me, well i'd probably let Bronx do what he wants which i'm sure would be to try and tear the dog a new one....he's not a friendly fella to strange dogs and if one was trying to hurt me i reckon he'd protect me big time. Same goes with Mojo but Mojo would rather do the Bullmastiff thing and use his body weight to pin the dog down and hold him. Hopefully i'll never need to find all this out for real. Mojo might run away dragging me on my back down the road LOL.


    Now on the other hand my dogs could very well be the dogs mentioned in the above posts.....i've watched lotsa people cross the road or turn around and walk thier dogs away from us. I dont blame them though, even though i know Mojo is spewing because there go's another potential play mate.

    With Bronx, to be honest i'm glad they walk away. He's a grumpy bugger somtimes. But this is also the reason my dogs are NEVER off leash and why i always walk my guys on a check chain. If Bronx did decide he wanted a piece of the poodle walking past then i have the opportunity to stop him in his tracks with a check...again and again if necessary. If either of my guys attacked another dog for no good reason i'd have no hesitation in kicking the bejeesus out of either of them till the stopped.

    I'm sorry to hear of everyomnes bad experiences walking thier dogs. Makes me realise how lucky we have been. (Touchwood).
    And for the breeds mentioned...'pig' , 'bull' , 'Rotti' etc.....i still reckon the worse i've dealt with are the Aussie cattle dogs. Not wanting to upset this breeds owners just wanting to show it's not always the big ugly ones that are the bad guys...the small sneaky ones can be just as bad too.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    [QUOTE=jadielee87;188961] Probably not the right thing to do but in the past I have just picked the fatty up and waited for the dog to go/kept walking.

    QUOTE]

    LOL 'Fatty'???....you meant to say 'voluptious' ...didnt you Jadie.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •