Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: White Labrador

  1. #21

    Default

    We once had a dog which we gave away at 1 year old. I did feel like there were better options (training) though at the end of the day it was not my decision to make and I was not there when it attacked our 13 year old collie. I think its give and take in these situations, we took in a pekinese and a red heeler for the rest of their life when their owners couldn't keep them and the pekinese had been with it's previous owner for a very long time. The problems start when people take in cute puppies and take them to shelters when their older and would never consider any dog other then one they bought. So long as people are willing to help the situation I don't see a problem with it.
    I'm lucky to live in an area where most people are responsible dog owners and don't abandon/breed them.

    Main message again, it's all about give and take

  2. #22

    Default

    Hi 'curlykeno' and a belated to you and yours to the forum !

    Very sad to read about your DLD and hope that the Medical Team that you have will be able to offer every assistance to her.

    As far as a white Labrador is concerned – as what particularly Nekhbet said and also others – they do not exist.

    There are lighter shades of colour – but if you come across a breeder advertising just ‘whites’ – I would run a mile !

    Are you set on a Labrador ? There a lot of other breeds out there that come in with white coats – naturally !

    Breeding of Labradors is fraught with problems – if just breeding for colour alone or not giving a d a mn. Have a look at this link as to all the health problems that a Lab could have if not bred properly! Yes, it based on a lot of information from USA – but it is still very relevant.
    Disorders by Breed - Labrador retriever - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    If you may like to look at rescue – then the following links may help:
    http://www.petrescue.com.au/listings/dogs?
    utf8=%E2%9C%93&size%5B%5D=all&age=puppy&states%5B% 5D=5&gender=either&commit=Search


    Perth Labs

    Now something you may not have thought of – the only problem is that you would have to give them back :
    https://www.guidedogswa.com.au/guide...puppy-raising/

    Heaps of Good Luck Wishes with everything !

    P.S. I would love to see a photo of your Lab - Chloe - who still lives in NZ - but now with your Dad – please ?.

  3. #23

    Default

    maremma dog - Google Search
    http://www.dogzonline.com.au/breeds/...a-sheepdog.asp
    (Links)


    I just came by this breed tonight.
    Looks somewhat Labrador-ish.

    Last edited by Julieanne; 03-23-2013 at 03:03 AM.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Julieanne View Post
    maremma dog - Google Search
    Maremma Sheepdog Puppies for Sale from Maremma Sheepdog breeders, Australia.
    (Links)


    I just came by this breed tonight.
    Looks somewhat Labrador-ish.

    Beautiful dogs but not a breed I would recommend unless you're looking for a livestock guardian breed. They may look similar to Labs but that's where the similarities begin and end.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    It really depends on situation. I dont think having a young family has anything to do with it either as we have relocated from very far away (much further than NZ) with a dog when we were kids.

    I think it has to do with what the quarantine reqirements are, whether the dog can handle it or not, the expense of it and if you can find alternative arrangements and many other personal factors.

    Leaving the dog with family is entirely appropriate if the barriers are too much. The family can then have news on the dog and if they visit their dad they will see their dog again. Living on a farm in NZ with family sounds like a good option if all else is not possible.

    The question now is if you get this new dog is there a possibility of you relocating again down the track and possibly not being able to take the dog.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-23-2013 at 10:39 AM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    i think the only relevance of having a young family. Is that you have an additional priorities in life. Not just you, a boyfriend, and a furbaby.
    I wholeheartedly applaud you for making such excellent provisions for chloe. Selfless i call it. It appears others call it selfish. Hey ho.

    Now i like collies, i have a particular preference for tri coloured rough collies. To the extent, that i would not want any other colour. How come its ok for me to say this, yet not ok for you to want a white lab? Go figure?
    I like GSD's. But i have a particular preference for long haired reds. And have ensured ive only ever owned long haired reds. Same thing. Yes, i do chose what my dog looks like colouring wise. I dont have an issue with that at all.
    I dont get why GSD breeders get their knickers in a twist if you request a long haired. Nor does Crufts 2013 best in show! But i got slammed for saying i prefer long haired ones to a breeder. WTF?

    Now, 5 yrs into my relationship with bernie, his colour is irrelevant to my feelings for him. But i still to this day LOVE to see that coat in tip top RED colour condition, and flowing in the wind. This vision of bernie makes my heart sing, what's wrong with that? What's wrong with wanting a white lab.
    Bugger all.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    Beautiful dogs but not a breed I would recommend unless you're looking for a livestock guardian breed. They may look similar to Labs but that's where the similarities begin and end.
    Yes a Maremma is a working dog and generally unsuitable for the average suburban family as a pet.

    I would be looking for a dog with a lovely temperament and a good genetic background. It is advisable to get labradors from breedings that have been screened for elbow and hip dysplasia if possible as this is not uncommon in this breed and can have devastating consequences. The problem became such an issue with so many complaints that now all registered Labs have to be screened before they are bred.

    I am sure your daughter will love a puppy regardless of the colour, most kids do. If you can get a pup of the colour you want that ticks all the breeding and health boxes thats fine, but I wouldnt prioritise on colour especially if it is a very limiting factor.

    In the all the years I have owned dogs I have never selected on colour as this can really limit what you are looking for. I always seem to end up with black and white Border collies even though I would rather fancy another colour. I like prick ears, mine all have floppy ears. However they are totally fab working dogs with great temperaments.

    However I always ask for a short coat, where I live that is essential.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-23-2013 at 11:42 AM.

  8. #28

    Default

    I was only giving the information I knew, I try not to be too critical about things as it tends to come back at me lol.

    I personally think that the individual dog's personality is more of a deciding factor.
    I may have a Husky but he has certainly gone easy on me, while I'm sure there are some Labs out there that are quite hard to handle.

    Either way when you get a dog I believe you need to be ready to be flexible/ make changes if needed.

    EDIT:I agree with you 100% if a dog has been bred to work, though some working breeds being shown in the ring are not able to do the work they were first bred for.
    Last edited by Julieanne; 03-23-2013 at 06:07 PM.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    a maremma needs a job to do. It's still a primitive breed, a livestock guardian dog and despite people pushing them to live in suburbia they need livestock to patrol on property.

    I personally think that the individual dog's personality is more of a deciding factor.
    They're nice enough as pups. Then they grow up and either become nuisance barkers, neurotic or bite if not with experienced people, and then they are hard to rehabilitate due to their nature.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •