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Thread: Where has brindle come from in kelpie x golden lab

  1. #1

    Default Where has brindle come from in kelpie x golden lab

    Hi,
    I have a pup who is black with brindle face and feet, wondering if its possible to have come from the mixture of golden lab x pure kelpie? The owner swears there is no other genetics there. I'm happy with the dog just curious on her colouring and wondering if its possible with this cross or if there would have to be something else. I saw both mother and father, both looked like pure breds. 2012-11-20 11.50.11.jpg
    Anyone that might know the answer would be great!
    Cheers

  2. #2
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    My experience is people lie without a qualm about parentage. My current pup is the first one who actually is "medium sized". On a kinder note the kelpie could easily have something else in its genetic pool they would have no way of knowing. That little face is square for a kelpie but with a lab parent? Who knows. Glad you are happy with your pup, looks like a cutie.

  3. #3
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    No idea but how cute is he?! I love that he even has brindle in his eyebrows.

    I didn't think kelpie or lab could have brindle in their genes. Maybe they got lied to when they got either of the parents?

  4. #4
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    He is so cute that I'd 'like' him twice if I could
    Don't know about the brindle but if you google 'brindle labs' you get quite a few results. Apparently they do happen occassionally. Seems you've got a very special pup there
    Have a look here: Mismarks & other odd markings in Labradors part 2 - Woodhaven Labradors
    Last edited by margoo; 12-31-2012 at 03:52 PM.

  5. #5
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    the lab is not pure by a long shot then, brindling genetics is dominant, so one parent has to have some brindling, or they are both carriers of another gene which can cause it.

    Basic Coat Color Genetics

    Another dog could have got to the bitch. Not uncommon for people to think one dog is the father when in fact it's not lol

  6. #6
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    Nekhbet, I wonder about my dog. With your understanding of coat colour genetics can you shed light on this.
    I met both her parents. Mum was a Blenheim cavalier and Dad was a very dark chocolate mini poodle. All 6 pups in the litter were jet black with a hint of red in strong light.
    Over time my dog has slowly turned a silvery grey colour and at 18 months is basically a dark silvery grey colour with black fur on paws and ears.
    I must admit I have been a bit concerned that her diet is lacking in something and that is causing her 'greying'.
    Any thoughts?

  7. #7

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    To jholly, Are you in North Bris by chance? I have met 2 brindle pointed labs at Northlakes and both have pedigree papers according to owners. Both were lovely dogs but a bit hyper, even more than the average lab. What ever he is - he is a cutie.

  8. #8

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    Yes you can get brindle in Labs.

    BUT. For a dog to be brindle at least one of it's parents must also be brindle. So the short answer to your question is no. This pup has not come from kelpie x yellow Lab (Labs don't technically come in Gold, it is called Yellow).

    So either they are fibbing about the parentage, or another dog has got to the bitch as well and they weren't aware. They may have seen a mating with a kelpie, but that doesn't mean another dog hasn't has a go as well - in fact, one certainly has here - a brindle one.

    Dogs can have litters with several sires.

  9. #9

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    Grevillea your pooch sounds like she has a greying gene. This is certainly carried in poodles. Colour is determined by complex series' of genetic factors, which is why it is hard to predict in crossbreds as factors can appear that don't seem apparent in either parent. Your girl may also have a silver grandparent on the poodle side?

    From this site, a brief bit on the"graying" gene Coat Color Genetics:

    G, the graying series. Although only two genes were recognised in this series by Little, this may be a more complex locus, or genes that affect graying may reside at more than one locus. The effect of G, in single or double dose, is the replacement of colored by uncolored hairs as the animal ages, very much like premature graying in human beings. This gene should be suspected in any breed where a dark puppy pales and washes out with age, and the paling is due to interspersed white hairs. The gene is almost certainly present in some Poodles, Old English Sheepdogs, and terriers. The fading may start immediately after birth or after a period of weeks to months has elapsed, and may go as far as it is going to by the first adult coat or may continue through the animal's lifetime. G may or may not be the gene involved in the graying of muzzle and over the eyes in aged dogs, or in the lightening of black to steel blue without interspersed white hairs. This is a series that definitely needs more work.

  10. #10
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    Thanks Nattylou. I had read somewhere that greying can occur with poor nutrition but I doubted it was poor nutrition in our case. So pleased that you could shed some light on it. Much happier to think it's genetics

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