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Thread: Rehoming a dog with incontinence

  1. #1
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    Default Rehoming a dog with incontinence

    So a friend's mother got a dog from the pound. Lovely looking lab x spaniel, probably about 18mo.

    The dog was clearly never trained and a mix of your typical lab pup exuberance and Spaniel stubbornness. But she does have loads of potential. My friend has managed to do some training with her and finds her very responsive.

    Unfortunately, despite my friend's best efforts, her mother just doesn't get the whole training thing and seems to feel completely overwhelmed by it. To the point where the dog's behaviour is getting worse instead of better and is a disaster waiting to happen.

    To make matters worse, the dog turned out to have an incontinence issue, which might have been the reason why she was surrendered in the first place. Her owner has taken her to the vet a few times and spent hundreds on tests already, but there still isn't a clear diagnosis. They only know it's not diabetes (or UTI I would hope) but there are still 4 conditions that it could be and it would require more expensive tests. The owner is now broke and cannot see how she is going to pay for the tests and the ongoing treatment.

    But mainly because of the issues with training, she has decided it is going to be better for the dog to rehome her. And I agree. (She's getting a cat instead!)

    But how do you rehome a dog with an undiagnosed bladder problem? The rescue organisations my friend has contacted have not responded so far. It is also a very bad time of the year to try and get their help.

    Any tips?

  2. #2
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    if the dog doesnt have a bladder infection why not try her on Propalin? My cattle dog has been incontinent since puppyhood so we know it isnt spay incontinence. A simple test told me it wasnt an infection so I put her on to daily propalin and she is now 4 and never had a problem since. Likely scenario is a congential incompetant sphincter but I certainly didnt bother with all the testing to find out exactly. It would have been different if she hadnt responded to propalin, then I would have had to investigate further, but she did so that was good. My vet just told me to see if propalin worked first.

    The clues should be in the pattern of incontinence. If it is a constant dribble then it could be an ectopic urether from memory which does require surgery. My dog was just incontinent when she slept which was most likely to be an incompetant sphincter which was easily treated with propalin

    Propalin is probably going to cost around $25 a month I would guess although it will depend on the weight of the dog.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-23-2012 at 01:30 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks KC!

    I don't know if it came across from my post, but she needs to be rehomed anyway as her current owner is just not cut out to be a dog owner and the dog deserves a better life.

    But she will be so much easier to rehome with an effective treatment plan in place. So I forwarded it to my friend and hopefully they'll try this.

  4. #4
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    She needs to be returned to the rescue/pound for a refund and take the vet paperwork with you. Don't just move this dog on.

  5. #5
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    Hi Nekhbet, why is that? What would the dog gain by being returnd to the pound?

  6. #6
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    She came from the council pound. If they take her back there, they'll just adopt her out to someone again without telling them of this issue. That is the problem with the pound, they never tell you anything, even if they know. Never ask any questions either - no screening whatsoever, which is what got this dog in the situation she is in now!

    I think it's too risky for the dog. Which is why my friend is trying to get a trustworthy rescue org to help them because they will make an effort to ensure the new owners are aware of the issues and can deal with them. Not just 'moving the dog on'. She really is a lovely dog and deserves a good home. I don't believe that will happen if she goes back to the pound.

    Behaviourally, she would be fairly easy to train. But her current owner is just never going to 'get it' and no intervention is going to change this. Believe me, it drove my friend and I mad and we really tried to get through to her on this but alas.

    But personally, I wouldn't take on a dog with medical needs if I didn't know exactly what they were and what the treatment plan was. If I knew those things, I might consider special needs. So I think a treatment plan is going to be essential for successful rehoming.

  7. #7
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    I agree with seeing if propalin controls the issue... It works wonders!

    Hope the dog finds a great home

  8. #8
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    I did a google on this and it seems there are 3 different drugs for the same problem. And an implant.

    But the good news is... The lab rescue place have agreed to take her in!!! They actually had her name down for her when she was in the pound.

    I feel very guilty because I actually told this person about the dog in the pound. I honestly had no idea that she was not even going to try getting her head round the training stuff. I am very relieved she has now admitted that she should not own a dog and is going to adopt an old moggy instead.

  9. #9
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    My Rottie is Incontinent and is on Stilboestrol and has one tablet per week, which works very well. She has Incontinence because she's old and we can do nothing else.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  10. #10
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    I didn't know it was that common. Some sources claim 20% of spayed females have incontinence issues. Sounds like she saw a vet with not much experience in that area too. She spent 100s already and still no treatment. Bit poor. I know you wouldn't usually do that with humans, but with pets I think it's ok to trial medication as a means to get a diagnosis if possible. I am doing it with my cat to get some idea what she may be allergic to.

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