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Thread: Rehoming a dog with incontinence

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I didn't know it was that common. Some sources claim 20% of spayed females have incontinence issues. Sounds like she saw a vet with not much experience in that area too. She spent 100s already and still no treatment. Bit poor. I know you wouldn't usually do that with humans, but with pets I think it's ok to trial medication as a means to get a diagnosis if possible. I am doing it with my cat to get some idea what she may be allergic to.
    It is strange, the normal course of action for most dogs with incontinence is once infection is ruled out to try either Propalin or Stilboestral. I have had better success with Propalin and it is non hormonal which I prefer.

    I know my dog doesnt have spay incontinence because she had it long before she was spayed, hers is a congenital weakness, but Propalin still works a treat. It is good to know the history but I doubt you will ever know with this dog when the problem started. However the cheapest course of action would have been to try one of the drugs first. It is puzzling as to why all the tests were done.

  2. #12
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    It depends why the dog is incontinent, tablets do not always work.

    The dog came with a medical problem which is still not being fixed. Either the dog developed the problem at the new owners or it was that subtle they didnt notice it as being abnormal. The pound still needs to be made aware that the animal has supposed severe problems that make it unsuitable and should be returned to them either for rehoming or otherwise. Otherwise the dog is just going to be another handball dog over and over and over. What else do you think happens to a dog that's untrained plus pees everywhere?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    It depends why the dog is incontinent, tablets do not always work.

    The dog came with a medical problem which is still not being fixed. Either the dog developed the problem at the new owners or it was that subtle they didnt notice it as being abnormal. The pound still needs to be made aware that the animal has supposed severe problems that make it unsuitable and should be returned to them either for rehoming or otherwise. Otherwise the dog is just going to be another handball dog over and over and over. What else do you think happens to a dog that's untrained plus pees everywhere?
    As stated before, the pound cannot be trusted to handle this as I know they are capable of rehoming this dog again without informing the new owners of the issue. That would be totally the wrong thing to do for both the dog and the next owners. And I know we agree on the dangers of the absolute no kill policy, but I do not think the dog needs to be euthanised. It sounds like her medical treatment may be straightforward. And most of the dogs that are surrendered aren't trained (bring on a dog owner license I say!) and most experienced dog owners would not see that as a problem. This dog is very responsive to training - just had the bad luck of going to an owner who doesn't understand dogs at all and never will. My friend did some training with her while she minded her and made huge progress in a couple of sessions. She's a dog that has the potential to make a good companion dog if she goes to the right owner, which is where the rescue comes in.

    The rescue that is taking her is run by a vet who is willing to get to the bottom of it and develop a treatment plan. I don't know why you think handing her over to a rescue org instead of the pound - who only care about freeing up kennels any way they can - is not a good solution?
    Last edited by Beloz; 12-24-2012 at 06:50 AM.

  4. #14
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    Glad you have found a rescue that is willing to solve her issue and is run by a vet. It could be as simple as giving a tablet or syrup. If that doesnt work then you move on to the next strategy as I said before. I think doing a battery of expensive test in the first place was ridiculous especially given the original rescuers budget.

    They will also be able to observe the pattern of incontinence at the new rescue which sometimes will hold a clue as to the cause. I doubt the pound would bother.

    Sounds like a good solution for the dog and is in the best place. A family member of mine sometimes did specialist surgery on incontinent dogs that didnt respond to tablets held in a rescue that was run by another vet. She always donated her time. I would say incontinence is probably a reason people give up their dogs.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-24-2012 at 11:55 AM.

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