Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Dew Claw Removal - why is that allowed but tail docking is not?

  1. #1

    Default Dew Claw Removal - why is that allowed but tail docking is not?

    Well the other thread got me thinking - we've made it illegal to dock the tails of dogs and yet it's perfectly acceptable to remove their dew claws. Am I the only one who thinks this is a bit strange?

    I was watching my dogs enjoy their marrow bones this morning, and I saw them using their dew claws to try and hold the bone still so they could rip the meat off. All wild animals have dew claws (including ourselves but we call ours a 'thumb'). There might be some animals without tails (like the lynx's etc) but there are none that I know of without dew claws so it seems, in my mind at least, quite unnatural to remove the dew claw.

    Now I understand that it's done when the puppies are newborns and the nerves are developed properly so supposedly it doesn't cause them much pain - but I've seen 2 day old puppies get docked and they didn't really seem to notice that either - they just wanted back on the boob. I've heard that dogs can hurt themselves by their dew claws catching on something and so one argument is that it's done as a preventative measure. And yet, I've never seen or owned a dog that hurt its dew claw. Tails on the other hand - well I've seen more than I could count on one hand - my own dog has broken his tail.

    I'm not trying to argue that tail docking should be allowed again - I just wish now they would change the breed standard for breeds like the Dobermann to give them a better and safer tail. I'm just wondering why the removal of dew claws is considered humane and acceptable whilst tail docking is a major social faux pas. Am I the only one for whom this doesn't really make sense?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    I was under the impression that only dogs that grew rear leg dew claws had them removed because they where poorly attached to the dog in the first place...as in a very weak muscle and bone in them which can lead to injury down ther track.

    Interestingly Mojo wears his front Dew claws down naturally but i still have to clip the main nails.....where as Bronx's dew claws get reyzor sharp and long if i dont clip them.

    I'm sure all dogs have a use for front dew claws....like you say...'A thumb for dogs'.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    shitney
    Posts
    1,188

    Default

    reyzor sharp aye sean........ nice

    jonah wears all his claws out, bones take care of his dew claws, when i run with him it takes care of the rest........ glad too cos he hates me clipping them.....

    i agree with the OP though......... i think rotties and dobes look funny with tails........ but thats cos im only used to seeing them without.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    Neither of my dogs were born with dew claws.
    But i know of many dogs who have had their dew claws caught on something and ripped it either off or nearly off, its really nasty!
    and another issue with them is for owners who don't really pay much attention to their dogs nails, the dew claws often grow extremely long and curl back over and start digging into the dogs leg!

  5. #5

    Default

    Maddogdodge, look again. All dogs were born with front dewclaws. Your pics of Dodge clearly show front dewclaws. Some dogs are born with rear ones, but not all.

    The reason dewclaw removal is not banned like docking? My personal opinion would be that it is not so high profile. I have dewclaws removed from my pups, and my adults from other breeders have had their done too.

    Why?

    My breed are a fast moving and heavy breed, with long and flexible pasterns. They have been selectively bred by humans to be like this. When they run fast those pasterns are in contact with the ground frequently. If they turn at speed they commonly tear a dewclaw badly, if not off completely. It's an horrendous injury you wouldn't wish on your worst enemy.

    My vet tells me that one of the surgeries he most dreads is removal of damaged adult dewclaws. It is a full amputation, very hard work and traumatic for both dog and surgeon.

    In my opinion, like my vets', if that can possibly be avoided in a dog's lifetime by a brief nick as a youngster then that is a good thing.

    It's all about prevention.

    On the other hand, look at a Norwegian Lundehund. They have double dewclaws on all four feet due to their development as a puffin hunting breed over steep rocky terrain. You would never take those dewclaws off.

    We have selectively bred dogs to do certain things. And in some of those activities we can support them so that we minimise potential harm and injury. This is why docking, cropping and dewclaw removal originated.

    The argument these days is that docking is unecessary and done for cosmetic purposes only. Many owners, breeders and vets have seen injuries to tails that would suggest otherwise. Yet the majority and media driven view won out in this instance.

    edit - spelling.
    Last edited by Nattylou; 12-18-2012 at 03:37 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    My previous dog, sighthound x, injured her front dewclaw once. She was very prone to all sorts of leg injuries because of her speed. She only tore the nail though and the vet pulled it out without anesthetic. Fast and easy and it never grew back.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Maddogdodge, look again. All dogs were born with front dewclaws. Your pics of Dodge clearly show front dewclaws. Some dogs are born with rear ones, but not all.
    LOL... yep thats one of my more embarrassing fails...
    clearly i got plenty of sleep last night... for some reason this morning my brain was convinced that she doesn't have them... my bad... lol
    but i do know of a few dogs who were born without front ones. I have only ever met one dog that has back ones, haha

  8. #8

    Default

    My dog has a lot of trouble with her dewclaws. We try to keep them trimmed which is difficult when the vascular quick is so long, but about twice a year the whole thing just comes loose and tears away. She spends ages biting at them and yelping when she accidentally touches them on things. They usually bleed and it looks very sore and nasty. Eventually they tear loose and get lost when she runs on grass. When I have the money I'm going to pay for a removal operation so she doesn't have to go through losing them any more.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

    Default

    This is an interesting topic. I researched dew claw removal last year and found that removing the dew claw could lead to orthopaedic pain for the dog later in life. I forget the details, something to do with the dew claw being attached to a tendon in the leg.

  10. #10

    Default

    It seems stranger to me the more I think about. We won't let people trim the cartilage in a dog's ear - an area with reduced blood supply and resulting sensitivity - no that's too cruel. We won't let them remove the end of the tail because, again, that's just way too cruel. But how on earth did removing a digit receive such amazing PR?

    I've never needed to trim any of my dog's nails, he maintains them all but then he walks a lot and on hard surfaces (concrete etc). The dew claw must help him grip when running and changing direction for it to get worn down. I know they use their dew claws - something I can't say really for the end of the tail or the excess ear cartilage. And there seems to be a lot of information available to support keeping dew claws if you want a dog for agility as it improves their speed and well, agility not to mention new studies linking the development of arthritis in agility dogs to the absence of dew claws (might have something to do with what you mentioned grevillea47). I've never heard any convincing arguments for not docking or cropping dogs other than ones with no evidence - like that whole argument that the dog will remember what happened at 2 days and go on to have psychological problems...

    Well I don't know who or how they decide what's acceptable and socially ok and what's not but I can't make any sense of it.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •