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Thread: Cane Corso tail docking ???

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Geelong, Vic
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    the tail is meant to be removed at a couple of days old before the nerve ending and blood vessels are formed properly. It does have vertebrate in it but it is NOT like the rest of the spine, it has no load bearing capacities.

    As for balance and steering there are plenty of breeds that naturally have no tail and have no problems getting around. Most are working breeds too.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    My previous dog had one of those whip tails. She used to regularly hit her best friend the JRT in the eye with the tip of her tail. Made her yelp and walk around with one eye closed for half an hour afterwards. The JRT learnt not to stand behind her when she got excited. It was also dangerous when my daughter was crawling around. And my friends had to learn to grab their drinks off the coffee table when she walked past.

    Banjo's tail is soft and flexible and curls up in her normal relaxed/happy state. It's much less of a hazard to those around her. Or their drinks.

    This JRT had a docked tail. Never noticed it affecting her balance. I watched this dog climb 2 meters high into a conifer tree once. But I do like a wagging tail. Bum wagging is cute, but a bit of a sad alternative, I reckon.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I'm not sure how a tail would help a dog climb trees unless the tail could grab things like a mouse, monkey or snake tail.

    Mine uses hers when cornering... for counter balance, and for stopping - looks like she's put the parachute out.

    Tho sometimes when she's playing a fast game of chase me - she puts the tail beteen her legs when she's running so the other dog can't catch it. Still manages awesome corner work.

  4. #14

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    Yeah my old terrier had a docked tail and it was really lucky that he did because he spent as much time as possible down rabbit holes. One day we met another terrier who had a tail that curled over. They both ran down a rabbit hole and everything seemed fine. When they want to come back out though, they reverse as it's too tight to be able to turn around. Henry (my dog) was fine as usual and reversed out almost as quickly as he went in. But unfortunately the terrier with the curly tail got stuck. Her tail was being pulled in the wrong direction and she couldn't move. She made the most horrible noises and the old man who owned her nearly killed himself trying to get to her. Like 3 hours later we managed to get her out. If I ever wanted a dog for rabbiting, I would insist on getting the tail docked.

    Beloz, the Doberman tail is quite the weapon of mass destruction. But I do like Sammy's tail (even with it's broken crookedness). When he runs, he uses it like a cheetah to balance himself when trying to change direction quickly. That said, lynx's and bobcats are pretty damn agile and they don't really have tails...

  5. #15
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    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    I never thought of tails getting in the way of getting in or out rabbit holes! Now I'm kind of glad that JRT I walked had a docked tail. Even if I was still worried she'd get stuck (or meet a cranky snake down there) when I heard that muffled bark from underground.

  6. #16

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    Dogs don't use their tails for steering. It's a myth.

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