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Thread: So many different methods of training - the two major competing theories

  1. #51
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    I agree with you on the blanket 'no kill' policy, Nek. I wrote a long rant about it too, but decided it's not fair to post it here.

    Sometimes you just end up with a dog that's more difficult than you had expected. Some will be able to be managed effectively with patience, time and a consistent training routine. I hope yours is one of those, Ceowulf. You're off to a much better start already than lots of people out there. Including me with my previous dog who had some issues that I could've addressed if I had educated myself better.

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceowulf View Post
    Oh my god. What the hell?! How could they give this TO A DOG?!

    How am I going to take her off these meds? It could send her through the loop!

    Edit: I'm going to wait till school holidays so I can get back to Perth and take her to a good vet. Then I'll see if there's a way to reduce the dosage of a capsule (since the granules inside are kinda hard to divvy up!) and do it when I'm able to be home with her.

    Really a bit disgusted. Going to have some choice words with the kennel owners...
    The only way you are going to safely get her off the meds is with Vet assistance, guidance and supervision - and heaps of time.

    I wouldn't be having stern words with the kennel owners - unless the kennel is actually owned by the particular rescue group you got your pup from.

    A lot of times, kennel owners get caught between a rock and a hard place. They are doing something to help rescue groups - because of their love of animals - and then they get left to sort out the crap when things go wrong !

    You have said that you are not going to re-home her - so big s from me - though I am very sorry that you have found yourself in this predicament.

    Heaps of Good Luck Wishes - and remember that time, patience, love and consistency are important aspects of any training regime.

  3. #53
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    So sorry for you Ceowulf, how they can push a dog on medication for what everyone here is saying has serious problems is just unbelievable especially for a first time dog owner.
    This thread is a real eye opener for me,as I've owned papered breeds and raised them from pups with the exception of my Rottie and my new GSD girl. Thanks Nekhbet for your valuable input into rescue groups, I was told not long ago of one foster carer who keeps dogs in cages in the backyard and doesn't let them in the house, not my idea of foster care.

    When you think about it getting a rescue dog is a big risk, especially adults as you don't know the dogs background. The dog could have been attack trained, behaved in rescue and someone takes the dog next thing you know their in Hospital or worse that would be my luck.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  4. #54
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    But if you adopt from a responsible rescue org that uses foster carers with experience and common sense it is a totally different matter, dogman. They will let the dogs be part of their family while they're there so they really get to know them, they will be honest about any issues and refuse to let the dogs go to homes that seem unsuitable for them. Some carers will crate train their fosters, teach them loose leash walking, socialise them with dogs and people, teach them basic cues, etc.

    It is not all bad news - lots of these organisations do a fantastic job at rehoming dogs, but it is a completely unregulated 'industry' and therefor it does attract some nutters. Bleeding hearts who let their emotions cloud their common sense and seem to just be in it to give themselves a big pat on the back for saving dogs from being PTS. They often do more harm than good in the process and unfortunately give rescue a bad name. The org that was mentioned in very small letters here is one of them.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    But if you adopt from a responsible rescue org that uses foster carers with experience and common sense it is a totally different matter, dogman. They will let the dogs be part of their family while they're there so they really get to know them, they will be honest about any issues and refuse to let the dogs go to homes that seem unsuitable for them. Some carers will crate train their fosters, teach them loose leash walking, socialise them with dogs and people, teach them basic cues, etc.

    It is not all bad news - lots of these organisations do a fantastic job at rehoming dogs, but it is a completely unregulated 'industry' and therefor it does attract some nutters. Bleeding hearts who let their emotions cloud their common sense and seem to just be in it to give themselves a big pat on the back for saving dogs from being PTS. They often do more harm than good in the process and unfortunately give rescue a bad name. The org that was mentioned in very small letters here is one of them.
    Totally agree with you Beloz, there are good and bad in every field but we seem to hear more about the bad ones which is most Unfortunate .
    I think the same can be said about breeders too.
    Last edited by Dogman; 12-11-2012 at 06:22 PM.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  6. #56
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    Hi Ceowulf

    I hope you have enough meds to keep your dog sane (ish) - until you can get back to Perth and find a vet to help there.

    Did you save the trainer name I posted? She might be able to recommend a vet who specialises in dog mental health and OCD.
    Kathy Kopellis McLeod
    Dog Training Perth | Western Australia

    Prozac might sound outrageous - but I'm pretty sure it's standard for dog anxiety (like valium). There are some meds that humans take that dogs can benefit from too, and some that dogs must never have (asprin and paracetemol are toxic to dogs). At the moment it would be much better to continue than than when you run out, start sudden cold turkey for your dog.

    As for the rescue - you need to find out why they rescued that dog, where they got it from, and why they rehomed it with you on anxiety meds with no instructions for how to manage that. And when you have all the info - then you might want to pass that on to the places the dog was rescued from. Eg a group like RSPCA or AWL are not going to let a rescue take a dog from them if they know it's going to end up like the one you have. And I'm pretty sure Petrescue would want to hear your story if you got your dog from a rescue listed with them.

    rescues that rehome difficult dogs without appropriate support or up front information to inexperienced people - are bad for all rescues. Ie it re-inforces the idea that rescue / pound dogs come with major behavioural problems that can't be fixed with training. I don't think this is true for most. Some are just unwanted by people who view dogs as disposable.

  7. #57
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    Hey guys and gals, just wanted to drop in to give an update (end of school term is pretty hectic) since I didn't want it to seem like I'd just dissapeared after so much thought, effort and advice had been so freely given here.

    Peppa and I are doing well, I've had ~2 weeks of her not having a barking session at the fence. Though, admittedly I do still have to take her outside on the leash. She doesn't pull towards the fence anymore, and this afternoon I let her go without me at her side and surprisingly / happily, when I went out of sight. Instead of making a beeline for the fence line, she came looking for me instead.

    Walking wise, I've decided to remove her from all temptation. I go a bit further out of town to a nice remote area and train her for about 40 minutes every morning. Recently I've moved her back to the oval and the few times I've had dogs/people go past the oval line, I've been able to successfully get her attention with a quick backwards trot and "Come!". Followed by a few doggie pushups with a click and treat and she is typically ok.

    I've gotten in touch with a group in Perth called Paw Print Pet Training, they come highly recommended as positive reinforcement behaviourists and trainers. They cost a fair bit (170+ a session) but for all I know that's normal. Either way, I think it's worth it. As they can, after some initial training bring in a well socialised and communicable dog to help Peppa realise dogs aren't so scary afterall.

    I'm moving to teach in York next year, so everything is getting uplifted this week and shifted next year when the department assigns new housing (ah the life of a new teacher). Here's hoping I don't get put next door next to two psycho pups that love to bark all day

    Hyacinth, thank you for the link. I'm going to get in touch with that trainer and hopefully through her the vet you mention.

    You guys are amazing, thanks again!

  8. #58
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    All I can say is, your Peppa is one lucky dog to have found you!

  9. #59
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    I have paid $250 a session for my vet/animal behaviourist who specialises in B.A.T. I did however think that this was money extremely well spent.

  10. #60
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    I caught Kathy on the telly - giving tips on how to stop an excita staffy from licking everybody. It was on a repeat of episode 36 of "can we help". They stopped making that show in 2011 so there is no trace of the video on the abc website unfortunately.

    The tip was - train an incompatible behaviour (eg sit), and watch the dog for signs of an impending lick (dog's eyes give it away) and ask for the sit, and reward... Careful not to reward licking at other times with attention.

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