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Thread: An enquiry

  1. #31

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    Not sure if I should continue with this thread but it has raised some valid and useful points.

    Most puppy buyers don't know that their first email to a breeder needs to be a detailed resume , I dont believe it should be have to either.
    I'm not singling MAC out in this , I know many breeders with the same stance.

    I think its quite fair that a prospective buyer only sends a short inquire type email to begin with.
    Simple things such as do you have any pups availible and asking the price of pups etc is quite reasonable and I dont get why breeders find these emails so rude/wrong/whatever.

    I do think that the last minute bit in this particular email was a tad off putting but apart from that i really did see nothing wrong with it.

    I think that if the breeder answers these emails with politeness asking simple questions such as knowledge of the breed,fencing,family etc and the buyer then continues with one liners,or becomes rude,or shows they are not suitable etc then by all means they are obviously not in the running for a pup.

    It doesn't take much to send that one politely return email in my opinion.
    And using the old adage of 'but we breeders go through this time and time again' is just a cop out in all honesty.

    You are a breeder.
    You are looking for a suitable home for your pups.
    Therefor every email enquiring about your pups deserves a polite answer.
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  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    I think it's fair for a potential puppy buyer to send out a short enquiry - just to make sure the email address has a real person at the other end, but they should be ok with answering all the questions a breeder should ask.

    What isn't so good, is if a buyer thinks owning a puppy is the same as owning a stuffed toy - and chucks a hissy fit when the breeder responds with 20 questions.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

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    I really have a problem with the "buying a dog for the kids". I know it might not be meant the way I interpret that, but it always bugs me.

    And also buying a pup as a present. Though it is fairly clear that the buyer has been thinking about this for a while and in this case it isn't an impulse decision. Though he should realise that to get the timing right, some serious compromises would need to be made. Normally you would look for the right pup who would then be ready to go to his new home whenever. Not on Xmas day.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
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    Before joining this forum, I had no idea what was expected in an e-mail to the breeder and I probably would've sent a short e-mail similar to the one at the start of this post, thankfully the RSPCA weren't so judgemental (for lack of a better word). I agree that the breeder should send back asking questions, and take the responses from there.

    This time last year, we bought our first house and after years of living in rentals, we were both so excited to be able to get a dog! I wanted to buy a dog for my partner for Christmas, so I imagine my e-mail to a breeder would've looked terrible saying that "we just bought a house" "moving in a few weeks before Christmas" and "want a dog as a Christmas present for my partner" but that doesn't mean I'm a bad dog owner at all... My dogs get 2 hours at the park every day, get fed raw diets, are allowed in the house, travel wherever they can with us and are so loved it's not even funny.

    If something were to happen, I would rather move house, or even live in my car and keep my pets than give them up. Would the breeder have known all this from the first e-mail I would've sent? No. Does a short e-mail mean I'm going to be a terrible owner? No. Should the breeder give somebody the benefit of the doubt rather than putting them in the 'bad owner' category straight away? Yes!

    A dog owner should be judged on how they treat their pets, not if they can structure an e-mail correctly.
    Last edited by Kristy.Maree; 12-14-2012 at 12:51 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
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    3,301

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    Wow guys and gals....

    The above posts from Chop chop and Kristy Maree are tied for posts of the year i reckon.

    I had no idea how to approach a breeder until i joined this forum and got some good advice. And i'd consider myself a bloody good pet owner. I'd die for my mutts at the drop of a hat. That includes the 2 dogs i had before i joined up here.

    Its just a 1st enquiry email....nothing more nothing less. I think some are looking into this a bit to much.


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  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    A bit too much?

    I guess sending the email isn't something the would be puppy buyer does very often, but the breeder might get lots of them all the time. Even after posting on the breeder website that they are not planning a litter any time soon.

    I admit I haven't done my christmas shopping yet, often leave things to the last minute, but when it comes to big committments like buying a car, house, or puppy - I really do a lot of research and take my time. As it happened, I got my dog when she was 10 weeks old - the day was Dec 5th. A lot of people said "a puppy for Christmas" - and I'd say I'd been looking for a year and a half. Christmas bah humbug.

    So I can imagine the best breeders - who may well relate better to dogs than humans and are probably not all that tech savvy (a lot really are not), aren't going to respond well to an avalanche of emails wanting puppies for Christmas especially in December - when puppies take at least 3 months to make if the bitch should happen to come into season at just the right time.

    And the best way to discourage behaviour you don't like? Ignore it.

    Personally - I'd prefer the polite and informative email reply - but given many atttempts to be informative, get very rude responses - if I was the breeder - I might not. I'd let the person go do some more research, and hope if they're really serious - that they phone.

    After all - if you have 100 people treat you politely and calmly - and one rude offensive outraged person abuse you - who do you remember? It would take someone handing you 10%+ of your annual tax free income to over come that. Here one puppy to the grumpy disorganised abuser - for Hmm, $squillions. And I will have it back in 8 months time when it grows up enough to eat your favourite leather couch.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

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    I think a polite, sorry none available email is not hard to do and is polite.
    Just because, for example, a few truck drivers endangered my life on the road it should not colour my animosity towards all of them though yes, these ones would stick in the memory.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #38

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    I'm the first to take people on face value, and I have had a great many emails that are one line - how much do borzoi puppies cost? I don't take offence to that. People genuinely don't know and for many, there is no point even enquiring about details on something that it completely out of range. I do have to say that most are surprised and seem to think it would be more.

    But the Christmas gift thing would be one of the few things that would have my back up. Not enough to be nasty, but enough to make me very, very wary.

    A little story from me. My first purebred dog was of a non-beginner-type-breed - an Afghan hound. I was 20, pregnant with my first baby (planned, but 20 is still young - although I didn't think so then!) and renting. His breeder didn't immediately say yes or no, and I didn't do a resume or application form. She invited me to come and meet her dogs and made her decision based on who I was and how I was with them. I got my pup. I also stayed in touch with her for the 13 years I had him, and now - nearly 20 years later - am still friends with her. I was probably a gamble as a puppy buyer, I certainly was on paper! I wouldn't tick many, if any, boxes on a standard rescue group adoption form these days. But that didn't stop me from being a good owner.

    Some people are non standard, they don't fit expected molds. Some people can't string ten words together on email. But they may be spectacular dog people. Likewise some people who can say all the right things at the right times can be woeful owners.

  9. #39

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    Fantastic post Nat !
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