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Thread: What breed

  1. #11

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    I would say Cattle dog x. Probably with a Border Collie type. The black splodges are very cattle dog, as are her ears and head shape.

    Bull arab is a name given to a wide variety of types. Some people do try and breed them to a particular type, but many that get labelled bull arabs are various hunting mixes.

  2. #12

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    Sorry in the late reply back to the thread. Thanks for the opinions all. How reliable are those dog breed DNA tests where a cheek swab of DNA lets you learn every breed in your dog? Was thinking about doing it if I get some supporting comments. Not that it really matters what breed she is or not, we all love her no matter what, its all in the case of curiosity. Thanks once again

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    I see some cattle dog. Lol hard to tell with this one.

    It's hard for the RSPCA to know age, breed, history of dogs that have come in as strays so they have to do the best they can!
    Not sure if you take my comment about the RSPCA fabricating information as a insult, your deffensive comment sure looks that way. I'm sorry if I had upset you, however just to ponder on your comment, if I had decided to purchase her on the basis of that information (which I kind of did at the time) and that information was indeed falsified I could sue on misrepresentation. Perhaps if indeed they (RSPCA) do do the alleged contract breach then perhaps they should do a little better and stop lying to the ones that support them.

  4. #14
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    I'm a bit confused about the RSPCA comment. They take on dogs that are usually dumped. How are they supposed to know what breed they are? They take an educated guess like everyone else. Why would they deliberately lie to you? They only go to the effort to put a label on them because lots of people are so set on knowing their bitsa's breeds.

    Not knowing my rescue dog's breeds used to really bug me at first too. Thought about the DNA test too. But now I've settled on a mix of 2 breeds that she shows characteristics of. And I've accepted that I'll never know for sure and it doesn't bother me anymore. She's my mystery mix and perfect just the way she is.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I'm a bit confused about the RSPCA comment. They take on dogs that are usually dumped. How are they supposed to know what breed they are? They take an educated guess like everyone else. Why would they deliberately lie to you? They only go to the effort to put a label on them because lots of people are so set on knowing their bitsa's breeds.

    Not knowing my rescue dog's breeds used to really bug me at first too. Thought about the DNA test too. But now I've settled on a mix of 2 breeds that she shows characteristics of. And I've accepted that I'll never know for sure and it doesn't bother me anymore. She's my mystery mix and perfect just the way she is.
    I cant answer those questions. Please dont get me wrong, I support the RSPCA, however they should not advertise the animals falsely if in fact they do. Its a question of consumer rights, should the RSPCA be allowed to fabricate information on their animals in order to sell them?

    As mentioned in one of my previous posts its not crucial for me to know what breed she is as the family and I love her no matter what, including breed, it's because I hate not knowing things that I would like to know.

    When we went to purchase a dog from the RSPCA we had decided that with the many dogs/pups that they had that three of them appealed to us more then the rest. Including Star, a Staffy and a German Shepherd pup, the information given on these dogs did have an initial impact on our thoughts and therefore the decision, however it was more of when we observed them that we had more of an understanding of their personality and that is what we made the final decision to purchase her on. So now one can see how information has an impact on peoples decisions to purchase things, including but not specifically a dog breed.

    This does however fall within a moral conundrum, we must do what we must do to help save animals but we must do it considering society's laws and morals, including consumer rights.

    Is an animals life worth more than consumer rights?, quite simply and without expanding....yes. However as Australia is a capitalist country it will be hard for the man to put forward animal rights over a capitalist economy where human rights and consumer rights prevail over whats really right.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Looks a lot like some border collies - the short hair farm bred ones that I know.

    But she's a lot heavier than those. Is she a bit overweight or stocky like a Staffordshire Bull Terrier?

    The shape of her face is quite narrow tho which is unlikely with a Cattle dog or SBT x.

    Bull terriers also have the piebald as do the bull arabs (which are really bitsas too), and tenterfield terriers, great danes - which are in some Bull Arab lines - and failed (wrong spot distribution) dalmations and some ACDxBC (mine). But it's hard to imagine an ACD with no ticking. I've only seen one - it was an ACD x Dalmation - bear in mind ACD already have dalmation in them - he was the exact same shape and coat length as a traditional ACD - and the exact same spotiness of a Dalmation.
    Thanks mate, yeah she is a overweight however she is also naturally stocky. Very large rib cage considering the rest of her I think. Which I might add I thought also contributed to the Bull Arab line.... She has a very thick coat around the neck area which she seems to loose so much hair from, winter and summer. The skin in this area is very loose and baggy considering the rest of her too. She is about 30kg and stands at 41cm at the shoulder.

  7. #17
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    I see where you are coming from Micka.

    I spent a lot of time looking at photos and reading about bull arabs as I had applied to adopt a "cattle x dalmation"
    from a local rescue group. (I still reckon shes a bull arab but excellent temperament and most obedient dog I have met,
    so we are keeping her)

    Here is a link if you have not already seen it.

    Bull Arab Dog Breed History In Australia
    Challenges with Breed Verification and DNA Testing

    Currently there are serious issues for customers who want to buy a genuine Bull Arab from the original lines that were bred. Many backyard breeders claim they breed purebred Bull Arabs but the truth is - they don’t. They may look similar but they are not if you know what to look for. There has been a push by one organisation to rectify this problem in Australia and move the breed towards being a registered breed in Australia and protect customers who want the real thing! This organisation pushes for DNA testing as the sole method of verification.

    Bull Arab Dog Breed History In Australia

    DNA testing is not sufficient and will create too many variables. For example, if Labrador was found in the so called “distant relatives” in the test we will not know if it is 1/8 (great grandparent) or 10 or 20 generations back because the test is not accurate enough to distinguish the difference. As understood by many in the Australian Dog Industry the Australian company responsible for testing has definite profiles for approximately 40 breeds. You can’t use DNA profiles and tags determined for dogs from other countries because they can be different from profiles of Australian dogs of the same breed. So until DNA testing becomes more accurate and specific and tailored to Regions it has no place in determining whether a dog is a Bull Arab or not in Australia.

  8. #18
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    I don't know how reliable DNA testing is now, but about 10 years ago a friend of mine had her scruffy tiny white rescued dog DNA tested and the result was that the dominant breed was Dalmation!

  9. #19
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    Did the little dog have any spots at all?

  10. #20
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    near Sydney NSW
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    No, white all over.

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