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Thread: Unsociable Girl

  1. #11
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    Hi Beloz, Thanks for your reply, it is unusual for a dog not to snap at an annoying pup but Misty has the most placid of natures, I think it's her grandmothers nature..., Our Son does chastise Major for annoying Misty but unfortunately he is slow to learn , the family have only had him for a few months, he is 2yo and it looks by his behaviour that he may have been abused previously so we also have to be careful from that point of view, he has improved immensely in the time they've had him, he is a lovely dog but just full of energy, he will settle down as did our Misty, she was the same at that age.
    I have definitely taken your advice on board and will act upon it. Cheers.


    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    It's unusual for a dog to not tell a pup off themselves for being too pushy. Most dogs readily do that. But if she cannot tell him to back off herself, I reckon someone else is going to have to do it for her. There are very few adult dogs that will tolerate that kind of over the top, in your face puppy behaviour and I reckon they have a right to not be subjected to that. So I would tell your son to start training the pup to behave less wild around her. It'll take much longer than if your dog would just growl or snap to let him know when he oversteps the line, but I reckon it's going to be the only way to keep the peace.

    I'm not an expert either, but you probably need to learn to read your dog's calming signals to know when the pup's behaviour is getting too much and then train the pup on lead and walk him away if he is stressing her and only let him come near her if he behaves calmly and respectfully. This is not an overnight process, but it can work and he will get less interested in her eventually. Only then I think can you start working on giving your dog the confidence to relax when he is nearby. As long as this pup is being rude and pushy, I reckon it's not much use trying to get her to accept him.

  2. #12
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    Hi Hyacinth, thanks for your reply, I will certainly take your advice on board, Our Son has only brought Major over here on the odd occasion because of the stress it causes Misty but now that they are moving in with us we have to deal with the problem, so will be trying your suggestions out. As I mentioned in another reply we think Major may have been abused with previous owner, our Sons family have only had him for a few months. Thanks again for your reply, much appreciated. I will let you know how we go. Cheers



    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I think the idea of getting help and a training plan to deal with your dog's specific problems is a good idea. Otherwise there may be really bad fights - especially if you're not around to stop them.

    I think the chair is Misty's safe place - and I would not take that away from her - not before she has a new safe place - like her own crate that she can be at peace without being hassled by rude labrardors.

    I think walking them together is a good idea, but I'd start with a big space with few other dogs - idealy all dogs on lead and I'd walk the dogs far enough apart that neither is showing any signs of stress. Ie no looking away, lip licking or worse - lip curling etc. Happy dogs and then I'd let them be closer together. I think you will have to take it at Misty's pace and don't rush things. Give her plenty of time to work out for herself that Major is no threat to her. Some extra special treats or toys that she only gets when Major is around (but not too close) would also be good. And maybe swap blankets ie bring one over for Misty that Major has been sleeping on. Start with maybe just one night's worth of Major scent and see how you go.

    Look up LAT and BAT on this site and generally and have read of how to reward a dog for showing calm self control in an environment where they would normally be reactive (grumpy).

  3. #13
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    Hi Newsfie, thanks so much for your reply, I think it's more get away from the energy as our Misty is quite the lazy dog, we have to get her up and going and to have these pups come in who just want to run around and around the yard all the time becomes too much, but I feel there is a certain amount of fear in it as well because of the attacks when we were out walking, people who let their dogs loose and run out on their own. Grrrrrr. The chair is a place where there is not enough room for more than her.... The walking thing is what we definitely will be trying, it was suggested in another reply to get an item of Major's and get her use to that around, so will try that as well. We are going to take her down to Major's place and see what happens there as that way we will know if it's Major or just the fact other dogs are in her territory and she's not happy about that. I know when we go away she gives us the back treatment too. These dogs have only been in the family for a few months where as Misty is over 3yo now, the two little pups are the size of the ones that attacked her in the parks so we are really on the back foot with those two LOL but we intend to get over Major's hurdle first. Will let you know how it works out. Cheers.


    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    Is her being on the chair to gain height advantage, superior, as to I am the better one, or you think fear...I would have to see this. The not looking at them is often calming signs, but i am only guessing

    It might be better to ask for some help, where someone ( who does dog behaviour) can do a home visit and see what is happening. Sometimes we encourage our dogs behaviour (nervous/anxious/fearfull) by kind words and petting. It might do as beloz said to control the puppy, but also be more positive and give your dog some calming, positive Leadership.

    Hard to say without seeing, but I might put the older dog on lead and not allow her to go on the chair. make her sit/drop and keep the puppy also under control. maybe a good time to do some work with them together on lead. Even parallel walking might be good onto dog meet dog at a distance, but keep them both concentrating on the handlers.......Often when dogs have worked in the same area, things calm down. it might make the puppy tired and calmer too.

    Sad when puppies get attacked.it does leave some scars, but lots of work and just getting on with it often helps. Sad that it has been left so long

  4. #14
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    Two dogs of varying energy levels can be a bit hard to mix, especially if your girl won't tell him off and is scared of him. Though having two highly excitable dogs can be worse.

    Personally I wouldn't take away her chairs, I'd let her come around to the idea of the boisterous dog in her own time, to take away the chair may force her to take other measures considering her fear. Her chair is a bit like her own safe haven. Some people who have different size dogs, aged dogs or energy level dogs often have to give the dogs time away from each other.

    I have several dogs of various ages and sizes. My Whippet girls seek refuge from the excitable young and larger Saluki by sitting on top of the grooming table, it gives them a height advantage and he can't stir them up and make them run, he soon gives up and goes to play with one of the other dogs.

    Also of a morning when he is most active I put my older girls out in the front yard and he remains in the back yard so he can't annoy them when he's at his most excitable.

    I do think the walking will be a good idea and when the 2yo moves in lots of walking and exercise will be needed so that he doesn't annoy your quieter girl. Also make sure he has lots of stimulating toys. Getting used to each other takes time. In time you might also find the young dog is also not as fascinated with your quieter girl.
    Last edited by MAC; 10-29-2012 at 09:01 AM.

  5. #15
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    Just one comment, I wouldn't "chastise" the lab for the way he interacts with your girl. I would just calmly walk him away from her when he is over the top. Then if he can just stay calm, he gets to stay closer to her (if she is ok with this) and that will teach him what he needs to do as opposed to trying to teach him what not to do.

  6. #16
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    What Beloz said.

    If the lab is behaving unacceptably - catch him and prevent him from continuing the unwanted behaviour - give him something else to do that means he can't do the unwanted behaviour at the same time.

    Eg if he's hassling Misty - call him once or tell him to "leave it" once. If he doesn't stop, go get him, put him on lead and make him stay on a mat near you or put him where he can't get to Misty. Be really really consistent. Always back up the one request with physical removal / enforcement - ie go stop him. A bit like the bait and switch move or distract and displace used on human toddlers.

    No scolding or smacks are required. Just a calm tone of voice "leave it" or "stop" or "no" and then catch him and relocate away from Misty. Once he's away from Misty you can praise him for any attention he shows on anything that's not Misty eg you or a toy.

  7. #17
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    Thanks again Hyacinth, that is what we've been trying to do but Major just doesn't seem to be getting the message, he seems a bit slow to learn LOL, Patients seems to be the answer here, will definitely let you know how it pans out..... Our Son has spoken to him in a 'Gruff' voice and that seems to help for a little while but then he's back again so, as I said in a post last night, it appears that he may have been abused in the past so we are dealing with that as well. Poor boy, he really is a lovely dog and no problem other than this. He will settle as he get older. Gotta love our doggies......

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    What Beloz said.

    If the lab is behaving unacceptably - catch him and prevent him from continuing the unwanted behaviour - give him something else to do that means he can't do the unwanted behaviour at the same time.

    Eg if he's hassling Misty - call him once or tell him to "leave it" once. If he doesn't stop, go get him, put him on lead and make him stay on a mat near you or put him where he can't get to Misty. Be really really consistent. Always back up the one request with physical removal / enforcement - ie go stop him. A bit like the bait and switch move or distract and displace used on human toddlers.

    No scolding or smacks are required. Just a calm tone of voice "leave it" or "stop" or "no" and then catch him and relocate away from Misty. Once he's away from Misty you can praise him for any attention he shows on anything that's not Misty eg you or a toy.
    Last edited by Misty; 10-30-2012 at 12:11 AM.

  8. #18
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    Hi Mac, I agree with your last paragraph, if we can walk them morning and night it will wear Major out, here's hoping anyway. If all else fails, we can split our yard up, we are on a fairly big block and we can split front from back and both be fenced in so that will work but I would like them to interact.

  9. #19
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    Try pairing the "recall" with food. My dog equates "leave it" with "I get a treat from mum".

  10. #20
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    Also just one other thing. When disciplining the young dog make sure your gentle lab is not thinking it's directed at her or that she is also in trouble. It can make her less inclined to tell him off if she gets confused.

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