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Thread: Reasons for surrendering a dog

  1. #11
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    I think those 'reasons' despite how emotionally they are portrayed or not on the cards. Basically = i was not wanted.
    I dont buy into stories about how sad this was, or that was. It is irrelevant to me. And some stories are horrendous as you have described. If i fuse with all the emotions these cards draw from me, id end up the mad dog woman, overrun with hounds.


    I think the comment about breeders breeding blue SBT's, is a great point!

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    And I don't get why the councils don't do more about this. They should check if a dog is microchipped when they are registered, they should do random registration checks to enforce this, and they could at least be bothered to do an address check through the car registration system or similar when the microchip details are out of date. No one ever gets punished for just giving up on their dog like this. I think they don't even have to pay anything when they are found and decide then to leave the dog to rot in the pound. How is that a fair system?!
    I agree, it's especially weird since Victoria is such a heavily policed state with a fine for pretty much everything you can think of. How about a fine for abandoning your dog, after all it costs the taxpayer money in terms of vaccinations and feeding when the dog is accomodated in a shelter. A law that punishes people for abandoning their dogs is a law I could get behind.

  3. #13
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    Community service at the local pound would be a great consequence, i reckon!

  4. #14
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    Today's outrage: a 10yo dog with legs bent from arthritis and matted long coat left outside the pound. The pound staff had to watch this dog suffer because they are not allowed to treat or euthanise a dog for 8 days after they've been found in case they get claimed. My friend went over wanting to take him home but he was too far gone and will be pts tomorrow.

    Stuff like that really makes you hate people.

  5. #15
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    IM not a huge fan of people even without the cruelty/non caring aspects of some peoples natures

  6. #16
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    lol Lala. I've missed your honest comments!

  7. #17
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    Why is the Question, some people buy a breed of dog then keep them in the yard with no training, socialization and very little human contact then dump them because the grow too big and hard to handle.

    This was the case with my new Rescue GSD Chloe pictured below, I've only had her a few weeks and she has just turned 8 mths old how the Hell could people do this. These people should never be allowed to own a dog or any animal, then you get the low life's who dump old dogs because they don't want to pay for health issues associated with old age.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    Why is the Question, some people buy a breed of dog then keep them in the yard with no training, socialization and very little human contact then dump them because the grow too big and hard to handle.

    This was the case with my new Rescue GSD Chloe pictured below, I've only had her a few weeks and she has just turned 8 mths old how the Hell could people do this.
    Yep, I've noticed powerful breeds outnumber the softer breeds in shelters and people are more likely to get rid of a powerful breed.

    I have a theory that it's an instinctive need for some people to own a dog capable of hunting and protecting. In prehistoric times humans relied on dogs to help us survive (and vice versa) and we developed a symbiotic relationship. Symbiosis is a powerful force of nature, it partners crocodiles with birds, poisonous anemones with fish, bees with pollen plants, etc.

    Many people adequately look after their dog's needs. However because of our modernized consumer environment, a lot of people with that symbiotic need to own a dog are incapable of fulfilling their responsibilities, even though that instinct is still there. This is why we see so many people get high energy powerful dogs that they don't have the skills or resources to look after. It's irrational behaviour because it's motivated by pure instinct and not rational thought. They're not thinking "this dog will need a huge amount of effort and dedication every day for the next 15 years", they are thinking "this powerful dog will help me protect and provide for my family."

    Before cities, our dogs would work for us and watch our backs, we would have been close to them all the time. Nowadays that's not possible for most people. So they keep their dog cooped up in the backyard which is unnatural and bad for the dog's mind. The dog is an obselete tool with no purpose. With no work to do and a dysfunctional heirarchy, the dog becomes unbalanced - they're designed by humans and nature to have an advanced social structure and to be active all day.

    The consumer market for dogs exploits humans' biological need to partner up with a powerful predator. It turns a healthy normal instinct into a destructive selfish behaviour. This is taken further by deliberately breeding dogs into deformed mutants with squashed faces, popping eyes, and weak hips, that couldn't survive in the wild. It's a total aberration of nature.

    Most humans can't even properly care for a Staffy, let alone a GSD or Rottweiler - but those same people would probably have no problem with it if they were living in caves and hunting animals with spears. The problem is the artificial environment that our species has created for itself.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosh View Post
    Yep, I've noticed powerful breeds outnumber the softer breeds in shelters and people are more likely to get rid of a powerful breed.

    I have a theory that it's an instinctive need for some people to own a dog capable of hunting and protecting. In prehistoric times humans relied on dogs to help us survive (and vice versa) and we developed a symbiotic relationship. Symbiosis is a powerful force of nature, it partners crocodiles with birds, poisonous anemones with fish, bees with pollen plants, etc.

    Many people adequately look after their dog's needs. However because of our modernized consumer environment, a lot of people with that symbiotic need to own a dog are incapable of fulfilling their responsibilities, even though that instinct is still there. This is why we see so many people get high energy powerful dogs that they don't have the skills or resources to look after. It's irrational behaviour because it's motivated by pure instinct and not rational thought. They're not thinking "this dog will need a huge amount of effort and dedication every day for the next 15 years", they are thinking "this powerful dog will help me protect and provide for my family."

    Before cities, our dogs would work for us and watch our backs, we would have been close to them all the time. Nowadays that's not possible for most people. So they keep their dog cooped up in the backyard which is unnatural and bad for the dog's mind. The dog is an obselete tool with no purpose. With no work to do and a dysfunctional heirarchy, the dog becomes unbalanced - they're designed by humans and nature to have an advanced social structure and to be active all day.

    The consumer market for dogs exploits humans' biological need to partner up with a powerful predator. It turns a healthy normal instinct into a destructive selfish behaviour. This is taken further by deliberately breeding dogs into deformed mutants with squashed faces, popping eyes, and weak hips, that couldn't survive in the wild. It's a total aberration of nature.

    Most humans can't even properly care for a Staffy, let alone a GSD or Rottweiler - but those same people would probably have no problem with it if they were living in caves and hunting animals with spears. The problem is the artificial environment that our species has created for itself.
    Also some people see a dog breed in a movie or on TV and want one, the problem is breeds like Rotties and GSD's don't come already trained.
    You must train them from a pup and it's not easy, it's hard on going work. They must go to obedience training from 4 mths of age, as they say GSD's are not for every one especially if people just leave them in the yard.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    Also some people see a dog breed in a movie or on TV and want one, the problem is breeds like Rotties and GSD's don't come already trained.
    You must train them from a pup and it's not easy, it's hard on going work. They must go to obedience training from 4 mths of age, as they say GSD's are not for every one especially if people just leave them in the yard.
    Yep there is that too. Our minds are conditioned to think of everything as a product to be consumed.

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