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Thread: adopting a second dog

  1. #11
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    Do you reckon there is a chance she'll stop to escape? She has been moving quite a bit in the last 2 weeks. From the farm to an emergency foster carer, then to her real foster carer and then to a second emergency foster carer. And now to us... so perhaps she just feels a little lost right now. She is really clingy and wants to sit on our lap all the time.

  2. #12
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    Congrats on the new dog! Very exciting!

    It takes a dog a few weeks to accept a new place as home, so I think you won't get to see her real attitude until then, I reckon.

    I remember when I had only had Banjo for a couple of weeks, I went for a walk at the river (wild place, no roads nearby) and I let her off the lead to play with my friend's lab. Which all went well until I got distracted and eventually discovered she had followed some complete stranger back to the carpark! That was the only time she ever ran off... I could leave the gate open all day now and she wouldn't go further than the neighbour's frontyard.

    So I think it is very hard to predict how they will be once they get used to their new life.

    Is she house trained? If she is, I'd definitely leave her inside during the day. You simply cannot risk her getting out at this stage. Or use a runner lead outside. Give it a few weeks and then test her again.

  3. #13
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    She seems to be housetrained. No accidents so far. Since she jumped the fence I have followed her around in the garden (trying to be not too intrusive) and when I 'caught' her peeing behind the shed she tried to run away from me and was obviously scared I'd punish her So at this stage everyone is telling her constantly how wonderful she is... we're determined to get that tail wagging

    And she ate! Like a horse! I'm really relieved that she at least eats ok.

  4. #14

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    Poor girl. She must have been through so much. Might take her time to settle in and realise this is where it ends and from now on it is all stable.
    You are wonderful for taking her on and trying your best to make her happy.
    Good luck!!! it may take some time but I truly think they appreciate it at the end and it pays off...

  5. #15

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    I find the best thing with dogs from backgrounds like this is confident and cheerful leadership type behaviour, like you would with human kids. Be the slightly bossy parent figure. Now I don't mean tell her off at all - she sounds like she doesn't need that at all. I mean like a pre school teacher with little kids who are upset at being left by parents. A bit of a positive no-nonsense sort of approach.

    Don't reassure her when she is unsure. Pretend the world is a sunny happy place - ignore all perceived problems. And redirect her attention if you can. If you can't, she will still pick up on your positive attitude and relax a bit.

    And good routine. food, walk, play etc at about the same times each day etc.

  6. #16
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    This JRT I've mentioned in another post used to be a bit like this. Very scared of being punished over things that dogs normally get praised for. As a consequence she didn't seem to understand the concept of being rewarded for good behaviour. Very sad. And I ended up having to scare her and physically drag her out of her hiding spots just so I could then reward her. It was counter-intuitive and not a pleasant thing to do, but consistency did the trick and she came good. So I think being ultra consistent in all your reactions to her is going to be vital. Which I reckon is the secret of the preschool teacher too.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    This JRT I've mentioned in another post used to be a bit like this. Very scared of being punished over things that dogs normally get praised for. As a consequence she didn't seem to understand the concept of being rewarded for good behaviour. Very sad. And I ended up having to scare her and physically drag her out of her hiding spots just so I could then reward her. It was counter-intuitive and not a pleasant thing to do, but consistency did the trick and she came good. So I think being ultra consistent in all your reactions to her is going to be vital. Which I reckon is the secret of the preschool teacher too.
    This is such a sad reality, bless you guys for persisting with these poor little loves that must live in fear of everything and probably have no idea why. I'd be so sad if my girl cowered in fear

    Margoo, hope your girl settles in soon, and starts to relax and enjoy her new fun life and be a chubby tail wagging baby

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    So at this stage everyone is telling her constantly how wonderful she is... we're determined to get that tail wagging
    It's great you're making progress, it can be so rewarding bringing a timid dog out of its shell. However make sure you only give her affection when she is displaying courageous or outgoing behaviour, otherwise you risk reinforcing the fearful timid behaviour even more. Try not to give her too much affection when she's scared or upset, instead just give her a reassuring pat. This may seem weird but when she's acting scared you can make her feel a bit more confident by physically manipulating her body - take her tail and make it point upwards, and put your hand under her chin so her head is elevated, mimicking the posture of a confident, dominant dog.

  9. #19
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    Well she is a lot happier today She decided the proper place to sleep is in our bed and helped herself to a pigear when the cuboard door stood open. Nero just stood and watched in awe! He'd never do such a naughty thing. Never! This morning we took her for a quick walk to a creek. Initially we didn't plan to let her off the leash but she was so excited about the water and wanted to go in so badly that we dared to let her off for a little while. Oh boy! That was a completely dog coming out all of a sudden. She was bouncing up and down like a rubberball, doing crazy zoomies along the creek. I thought she'd take off any second but she came back allright.

  10. #20
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    Aww, that's great. Banjo always does zoomies (and rolling around in the dirt/grass/sand) when she's been for a swim. Such a joy to watch!

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