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Thread: Stopping a dog fight - nearly sh**t myself!

  1. #11
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    Aug 2011
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    That would've been bloody scary with two such big and powerful dogs.

    I had a dog whose hobby it was to get into scraps. I witnessed dozens and only once was there blood, and it was my dog who got puncture holes - and nothing requiring medical attention. But it still got the adrenaline going and even though I got used to it up to a point, there were still times when I got very emotional because I had not managed to prevent it. But there is very little you can do about a situation like you described. When the other dog is that close and ready 'to go', we get reminded that physically we are piss weak compared to our canine companions.

    Adrenaline will do weird things to your brain though. Hope you are feeling better now and that your body is not feeling sore anymore. At least you know that Bernie is not inclined to try rip flesh of an opponent, which is a blessing.

  2. #12
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    Bernie, how awful!!

    Dont worry about your reaction, you cant be expected to react exactly the right way every time!

    I generally avoid dogs when out walking due to reactions from my guys (different but always resaulting in bad). However when I have been in similar positions with previous dogs (or dont need to avoid other dogs), the firsat thing I always do when another dog is showing aggression, is release my dogs.

    I would release Barney too, Pippi is the only one I wouldnt release because shes small.

    Its probably not the right thing to do, but its something I feel comfortable with. If I am not hanging on to their leads, that are able to defend themselves if the need arises, and I can be going in for the other dog without having to manage my own dogs.

    Fights are scary though. Ive seen a lot of fights (and been bitten trying to separate) and I still find em scary - its the noise I reckon!

  3. #13
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    Jun 2011
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    It's always frightening. When it's other people dogs I can go thru the motions of my training without a problem, when one of my own is involved - not so easy.

    As Bernie is a long coat be sure to check very carefully for any hidden punctures. We missed one small puncture on my in-laws Sheltie after she was attacked and it turned into a huge mess very quickly.

  4. #14
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    Dec 2011
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    Logan, Brisbane QLD
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    I know exactly how you feel and it is not a nice experience at all, it's especially hard every time you have to pass that particular area, i still get anxious when i walk down that exact same park and i find myself always have a quick peek at the house where i know the dog is from and seeing whether the gap in their fence is open again for a free for all.

    And yes, no matter how much people tell you how to react in such a situation and what they would do doesn't help much at all. There isn't really a right or wrong way to go about it because every situation is different & it comes down to what is available to you at that time being and whether or not your good at thinking on the spot.

    Having such a protective dog helps. PERSONALLY (and this is my opinion) i think if you have a dog that is very protective and you know stands a good chance then i think you should just let them go. Doesn't make any sense to me getting bitten when you have a dog that's quite capable of protecting itself and you.

  5. #15

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    i've always found that by thinking through possible scenarios and having a plan of attack ready gives you the best chance of reacting in the best way possible. As a completely offtopic example but one that requires MUCH quicker reflexes and has much more severe consequences if you get it wrong, when riding motorbikes, i had a rule, make a decision and follow through, NO second thoughts. I also had rules such as if i find myself without sufficient room to stop(both car and bike) remember to look for somewhere else to go - other lane, footpath whatever .. look and go if clear(too many people freeze up and just run up the back of someone because they don't have a predetermined course of action). As far as dog fights go it's probably less clear cut but i believe that spending some time thinking through possible scenarios before they happen and having a predetirmined plan gives you a much better chance of a good outcome.
    Last edited by mymatejack; 08-27-2012 at 10:40 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    Thankyou for the kindness shown me. Im fine, a little wiser perhaps.
    That plan to reintroduce Bernie to suburban streets, went to the dogs. We met, female cocker spaniel, that was frothing at the mouth on her lead to get to Bernie, snarling and barking full on eye contact, tail right up, hackles up. Freaked him out, and i chose that moment to slip up and landed on top of his back hips. He's yelped in pain. And then calmed down, whilst the other people dragged the frothing noisy spaniel off. Frankly, i was shocked that a spaniel was like this? Ive not met a aggressive one before.
    So, tomorrow, im stalking dog to dog friendly dogs at our old stomping ground. A group of dogs that meet daily for the sunrise walk. I want reassurance that Bernie will not now be dog to dog aggressive with friendly dogs. so i aim to guide him through that this week, a few times. with lots of frisbee/ball/water rewards.
    Ive lost a little confidence perhaps.

    So if you see us, out n about..... come say hi!

  7. #17
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    I noticed recently that Banjo is scared of all GSDs we meet. I can't know if she has had any bad experiences with any, but I suspect she just thinks they look intimidating. I must add that she tends to avoid dogs much bigger than her in general, and some GSDs kinda look bigger than they are, if you know what I mean.

    Can't say I've met an aggressive spaniel either but my previous dog hated all of them with a passion for some reason. To the point where I just automatically called her to me if I spotted one.

    Just to say that some dogs can be really 'breedist'.

    I'm sorry that you and Bernie had to go through these experiences. I hope he will enjoy meeting some friendly dogs this week and that you will both regain your confidence.

  8. #18
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    Dec 2009
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    just got back from a lovely dog to dog friendly romp. Bernie thrilled to see his old friends as was i.
    No dog aggression from bernie what so ever.

    Im now happy.

  9. #19
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    Jun 2012
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    Sunshine Coast
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    Yay great news here I needed some this morning
    “All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed. For after all, he was only human. He wasn't a dog.”
    ― Charles M. Schulz

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