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Thread: What if my dog hurts a escaped cow?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    Default What if my dog hurts a escaped cow?

    There have been 2 mornings recently, where cows have escaped from a fair way off, wandered down river to the paddock out the back of my house.
    Bernie, our working line GSD thinks they are HIS! Its his life long dream im sure.

    On arrival to paddock, we come face to face with a herd of cows. He's off in a second, rounding the bloody things into the garden, grrrr. But came away from rounding up when called, but watched them longingly from our deck for the morning.

    I know that bernie could jump our fence. And on 2 occasions has, but has not left the property, which requires a small leap over a single wire that's 2ft high.

    Where would i stand if farmers cow got injured, having escaped into our paddock?

    Where would i stand if a escaped cow hurts my dog by entering my property that is not cow proof?

  2. #2

    Default

    his cows in your private area = its yours - simple :-)
    I'll just say tough, you better keep your cows away from my property (this is not being rude) in the first place they should not roam to your yard, what about if they destroy your garden or something?
    m<(o.o)>m

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Default

    I know that we are responsible for our cattle if they get out in any damage they do........That is why we are insured

    If your dog injured a cow in your paddock I think your dog would be safe, but if your dog injured a cow outside your fence your dog could be deemed a dangerous dog/"stock-chaser".

    The Farmer should be made to keep his cattle secure....... Firstly go and see them, discuss........If no result, ring the local pound/ranger, get them to pick up the stock and he will have to pay the fees to get them out. We have done this with a couple of ponies that keep getting out........I was more worried about potential car wreck on a country road.

    Stock-chasers often loose in court
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Default

    German Shepherd dogs are sort of herding breeds. Well they're more about keeping the naughty sheep out of the farmer's vegie patches than rounding them up to bring them in for crutching. But they can do it.

    I imagine cows in the yard would be a perfect LAT/BAT training opportunity ie training him to ignore the cows or at least be gentle wtih them (a long piece of electrical conduit pipe can help here - used between dog and cow to separate and set approach limits).

    Cows are worth a lot of money - I can't imagine why a farmer would be so careless with the fencing to allow repeat escapes. Maybe a chat to your local council about what the appropriate thing to do here is. You could perhaps send a bill for agistment?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
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    Default

    The farmer is responsible if cows stray and cause damage.
    Hubby rushes off to return a cow that has escaped when we get a call about it and he does a fence check..
    Sounds like this farmer needs to check his fences or he leaves gates open. You can..wink wink nudge nudge tell him you very narrowly missed one in your car (that is if a road is in that area where the cattle are)

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #6

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    best solution - is to tell the farmer to attend obedience classes bahahaha
    m<(o.o)>m

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Default

    Not too long ago, we had a local cow escape onto the freeway and decide to do a Bolt into oncoming traffic... caused no flesh injuries to the cow, but panel damage in the dogem car bumper relays that ensued when motorists doing 100kmh tried to avoid said Usain Bolting Cow forced the farmer off the land - he was on the hook for every cent in damage.

    Moral of the story - his cow, your land = his problem... his cow, no mans land = everyone's problem... his cow harassed by dog, your land = his problem... damage to your dog on your land by his cow = very big problem for him.

    Solution - have a quiet and very polite word with the farmer. But let him know in very clear terms that it cannot happen again or you will have to resort to council intervention to protect both of you. Council fines for escapee livestock are pretty hefty these days I'd imagine - in my area, it's $580 to collect your dog from the pound {registered} plus another $580 if it's unregistered... so I'd imagine a cow would be a bit more exxy than that... multiplied by numerous cows, and yeah, if the farmer is even partially smart, he'll want to avoid the pound!

  8. #8

    Default

    well I dont know, these situation has be resolved from both parties. If the cows were outside the farmer's perimeter then I think there is nothing to worry about but still, it is hard thing to resolve.. just tell that farmer to be careful next time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    Default

    No sign of cows for a week now. Farmer has sorted it clearly.
    Poor bernie, he nearly got some new things to round up.

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